Gregg Museum of art & design
Exhibitions

The Gregg Museum has moved!

The Gregg Museum has moved to a temporary swing space. In our transition, we will have exhibitions on display in other galleries across Raleigh. Read below to find out where each exhibition will be. For more information about the Gregg Museum of Art & Design please call us at (919) 515-3503 or e-mail us at gregg@ncsu.edu. For more information about the move, please click here.

 

 

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Late Spring – late Fall, 2015 
Life's Little Dramas, the World of Puppets and Illusions

D.H. Hill Library, Exhibit Gallery
2 Broughton Drive, Raleigh, NC

The Gregg Museum recently acquired an important collection of international puppets gifted by retired commercial artist John C. Henry, including an entire cast of the 19th century English Punch and Judy figures, Indonesian shadow puppets, a Chinese Opera Troupe, and a large Yayaroba figure from the Bamana tribe of Mali.

 

Puppetry is an age-old art form – examples have been found in Egyptian tombs and miniaturized dramas were popular with the ancient Greeks – but puppets also played a major role in the development of technology and media. The first–ever televised image (in 1928) was an articulated Felix the cat. Meanwhile, Howdy Doody was the first program to air five days a week, as well as the first show to be broadcast in color. Both anticipated today's interactive video games and computer design. The cultural perceptions revealed by puppets, from the prehistoric belief that inanimate objects possess spirits, to the computer's ability to create convincingly animated images of inanimate things, offer another way to trace the technological history of humankind.

 

 

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Permanent Collection

The Gregg Museum of Art & Design maintains a permanent collection of more than 20,000 objects, including textiles, ceramics, folk and outsider art, photographs, furniture, ethnographic artifacts, architectural drawings, and fine art. Any student or member of the public can arrange to access and study them personally by contacting the museum ahead of time.



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