Note: The JCRA launched a new Web site on March 1. Please visit us at http://jcra.ncsu.edu. This site, http://www.ncsu.edu/jcraulstonarboretum/, is no longer being updated.

Connoisseur Plants – 2005

Connoisseur Plants are rare, new plants or hard to find old favorites, and they are part of the annual appeal and membership drive to benefit the Arboretum's many fine programs and its day-to-day operational expenses. These wonderful plants were sent to those who joined the Friends of JC Raulston Arboretum in 2005 and in December of the previous year at certain higher membership levels.

In 2005, we offered a total of 60 taxa from which our members were able to choose! These plants are no longer available.

Alocasia macrorrhiza 'Variegata' – variegated giant taro Alocasia macrorrhiza 'Variegata' (Araceae)
variegated giant taro
Truly an eye catcher in the garden. This perennial adds a tropical feel to any garden with its massive, lush elephant ear shaped leaves. 'Variegata' is a beautiful selection with leaves decorated with creamy white splotches. Leaves of Alocasia macrorrhiza are borne on stalks that are 2'–4' long and can reach 3'–6', but 'Variegata' is a shorter plant. You can find giant taro growing naturally in the tropical forests of Sri Lanka, India, and Malaysia as an understory in openings and along streams. Grows well in sun to light shade, but leaves will be larger with some shade. Grows best in a moist, well drained soil rich in organic matter. Best if planted outside next spring. Zones 7b–11. (1 quart – available for pickup only)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 14
Number of photographs in J. C. Raulston's slide collection: 1

Begonia 'Kaylen' – hardy wax begonia Begonia 'Kaylen' (Begoniaceae)
hardy wax begonia
If you love wax begonias but hate planting them every year, this is the begonia for you! Originally from the University of Georgia, 'Kaylen' produces rose-red flowers throughout the summer and into the fall on plants with burgundy foliage. Unlike Begonia ×semperflorens-cultorum, 'Kaylen' has tubers which help it survive harsh winters down to 0°F. Begonia 'Kaylen' is a more open plant than typical wax begonias and can be grown in full sun to partial sun. Zones 7–11. Since these plants are greenhouse grown, do not plant them outdoors until spring. (4" – available for pickup only)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 7

Berberis &timeslologensis 'Apricot Queen' – apricot barberry Berberis ×lologensis 'Apricot Queen' (Berberidaceae)
apricot barberry
You will enjoy this choice semi-evergreen with its masses of superb apricot-orange flowers each spring. Fall color is fabulous, with a nice mix of both vibrant red and deep burgundy leaves. Its foliage is dark green. Deep purple fruits appear as autumn approaches. Its growth is somewhat wayward, with long, slim spiny branches. The shrub needs a dark background and space so you can enjoy its eccentricities. Ultimately reaching 10' by 10'. Looks best in full sun, but will tolerate part shade. 'Apricot Queen' was awarded the Royal Horticultural Society's prestigious Award of Garden Merit in 1993. The USDA Plant Hardiness Zone rating for this plant is unknown, but we fully expect it to be hardy in Raleigh. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2
Number of photographs in J. C. Raulston's slide collection: 1

Buddleja davidii 'Red Plume' – butterfly-bush Buddleja davidii 'Red Plume' (Scrophulariaceae)
butterfly-bush
This is one butterfly-bush that is hard to resist. Unusual red-purple flowers cover this deciduous shrub from summer into fall. Graceful gray-green foliage arches with the fragrant flowers. The common name aptly describes this garden beauty. This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds. Best in sun to part shade. 4'–6' tall. Zones 5–10. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 10

Buxus harlandii – Harland's boxwood Buxus harlandii (Buxaceae)
Harland's boxwood
Rarely offered in the trade, Harland's boxwood is a superior dwarf (4'–6' tall and wide) boxwood for the Deep South. It has charming bright green leaves, plus a distinct and attractive dense, rounded form. It is slow growing and can form a multi-stemmed mound with foliage to the ground. Drought tolerance and pest resistance is better than most boxwoods. It also makes an excellent choice for bonsai. Full sun to partial shade. Zones 7b–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 18

Buxus sinica var. insularis 'Sunburst' – variegated Korean boxwood Buxus sinica var. insularis 'Sunburst' (Buxaceae)
variegated Korean boxwood
'Sunburst' is a variegated form of Korean boxwood. Medium green leaves are surrounded by bright golden variegation on slow growing, broad and mounded, broadleaf, evergreen shrubs. Plants reach 2.5' tall in many years and may eventually reach 5' tall in 25 years. Flowers are fragrant, but sparse and insignificant. Korean boxwoods grow best in sun to part shade. This is an extremely hardy species. Zones 5–9.
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Callicarpa shikokiana – Shikoku beautyberry Callicarpa shikokiana (Lamiaceae)
Shikoku beautyberry
Shikoku beautyberry is one of Japan's many beautiful beautyberries. Pink flowers appear on new growth in the summer and are followed by lilac berries in the fall. Growth is very upright reaching 8' to 10' tall. Best grown in full sun to partial shade. Callicarpa means beautiful fruit/seeded (kallos = beauty and karpos = fruit) and we certainly agree. Zones 7–9. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 7

Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Manger's Sunshine' – dwarf Sawara falsecypress Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Manger's Sunshine' (Cupressaceae)
dwarf Sawara falsecypress
This handsome dwarf Sawara falsecypress is named for Ted Manger (Hendersonville, North Carolina), who discovered this plant in his wonderful conifer garden. At 25 years old, the parent plant is only 3' tall by 5' wide, with bright golden foliage. Like most other dwarf conifers, it requires very little maintenance. A great plant that is unfortunately still very difficult to find in the nursery industry. Plant in a location with good drainage and full sun for best coloration. Zones 5–8. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

&timesChitalpa tashkentensis 'Morning Cloud' – chitalpa ×Chitalpa tashkentensis 'Morning Cloud' (Bignoniaceae)
chitalpa
You just can't beat chitalpa for an exotic bloom. White orchid-like flowers form on this deciduous, small to medium size tree in summer. This intergeneric cross between the eastern catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides) and desert willow (Chilopsis linearis) takes the best features of both parents. It is drought-resistant, a trait inherited from the desert willow, and it appears to be fairly hardy, growing at the JCRA since 2001. Fast growing, multi trunked trees ultimately reach 15'–25'. Its leaves are longer and broader than desert willow, but much smaller than catalpa. Full sun. Zones 6–9. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 6

Cissus discolor (Vitaceae)
rex begonia vine
An ornamental member of the grape family, this tender (Zone 10) vine weaves color into summer plantings and indoor conservatories. Deep green, silver, and reddish purple combine in the foliage and stems. This plant really caught the eyes of visitors when it was used in our containers in 2005 and especially when it was grown on the trellis outside Bob Lyons' office in 2003. These are tropical plants, greenhouse grown, and are not hardy here. Plant outside in the spring for a full season of color. (4" – recently rooted cuttings – available for pickup only)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 5

Clematis crassifolia – evergreen clematis Clematis crassifolia (Ranunculaceae)
evergreen clematis
This is a supreme, brand new evergreen vine whose beautiful foliage is reason enough to grow it. Large thick textured, dark green leaves (to 5") are attractive and heart shaped. Flowers are small and white with four petals. This evergreen clematis is native to southeastern China, Taiwan, and southern Japan and reaches 10' to 13' high. Our original plant was recently acquired from plantsman extraordinaire Dan Hinkley of Heronswood Nursery (Kingston, Washington). Full sun to partial sun. Zones 7–10. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Coniogramme gracilis – bamboo fern Coniogramme gracilis (Pteridaceae)
bamboo fern
Bamboo fern is a very unique evergreen fern that will make a fabulous addition to your woodland garden. Its foliage is glossy green and ribbon-like, reaching 18" tall. As observed by Tony Avent at Plant Delights Nursery, Inc. (Raleigh, North Carolina): "This unique fern has been a standout in our garden for the past five years. In our Zone 7b garden, narrow leaf bamboo fern has made a nice 3' wide clump in five years, but it may spread slightly faster in warmer climates." Best performance seems to be in part sun to shade. Zones 7b–9. (1 quart)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Cornus pumila – dwarf redtip dogwood Cornus pumila (Cornaceae)
dwarf redtip dogwood
This diminutive, densely branched dogwood has many outstanding characteristics. Dwarf redtip dogwood's new leaves and stems emerge crimson red with the red color persisting throughout the summer and providing a nice contrast to the mature green leaves on this deciduous shrub. Clusters of whitish flowers appear in late spring, giving way in summer to black fruits that birds enjoy. Typically, Cornus pumila is a shrubby mound 2' to 3' tall and 3' to 4' wide, great for massing as a ground cover (when young) or a low hedge. It is slow growing, but it can reach 5' tall and a little bit more in width in time. Although in cultivation since the late nineteenth century, it is not found commonly here at the southern end of its range. Full sun to partial sun. Zones 4–7. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 5

Cyperus albostriatus 'Nanus' – dwarf umbrella plant Cyperus albostriatus 'Nanus' (Cyperaceae)
dwarf umbrella plant
Imagine your garden carpeted with a miniature forest of "palm trees" (6"–10"). This dwarf cyperus grows best in wet spots, but will also spread slowly in dry ground. It even makes a great water garden plant. Unlike some of its more aggressive relatives, this deciduous ground cover has covered only 3' in ten years in Tony Avent's garden (Raleigh, North Carolina). Full sun to partial shade. Zones 7b–10. (3 gallon – available for pickup only)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Edgeworthia chrysantha × E. papyrifera – hybrid paperbush Edgeworthia chrysantha × E. papyrifera (Thymelaeaceae)
hybrid paperbush
This taxa resulted from a spontaneous hybrid that originated in the garden of plantsman extraordinaire Ozzie Johnson (Marietta, Georgia). It is so new that we invite you to discover this plant's characteristics along with us here at the JCRA. Both parents have fragrant, creamy yellow flowers during the winter on plants that reach 6' tall. We expect the same from this new hybrid. Edgeworthia stems are tough, yet flexible enough to tie knots with and its bark is used to make a high quality paper. Paperbushes are best grown in moist, yet well-drained soils. Partial shade to shade. Zones 7b–10. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Elaeagnus pungens 'Chirifu' – variegated thorny eleagnus Elaeagnus pungens 'Chirifu' (Elaeagnaceae)
variegated thorny eleagnus
A charming variegated wonder! Each leaf looks as though it has been splashed with loads of yellow paint over a bluish-green base. If you are looking for brilliant winter color in your garden this broad leafed evergreen is for you. This variegated form is vigorous but slower-growing than the species and was a real champ during this past summer's drought. This highly adaptable plant tolerates salt spray and is easy to care for. Full sun to partial shade. Zones 6b–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Eurya japonica 'Moutiers' – variegated eurya Eurya japonica 'Moutiers' (Pentaphylaceae)
variegated eurya
Plant connoisseurs will delight in this offering of a rare variegated form of Eurya japonica. This winter-flowering, slow-growing evergreen shrub is related to the camellia. Especially attractive is its strong herringbone branching pattern and dark green leaves that turn deep red in winter. Branches of Eurya japonica are used in Shinto ceremonies in Japan. Reaches 8'–15' tall. Performs best in shade to part sun in a moist soil. Zones 7b–11. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 4

Gardenia jasminoides 'Lynn Lowrey' – Cape jessamine Gardenia jasminoides 'Lynn Lowrey' (Rubiaceae)
Cape jessamine
Large evergreen shrub with fragrant single white flowers from mid-spring to early summer. Flowers are so fragrant that they can pleasantly perfume an entire room. Named for great Texas plantsman Lynn Lowery. Species is native to Pakistan to Japan, south to India, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Gardenias grow best in moist, but well drained, acidic soils. Full sun to partial shade. Zones 7–10. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 7

Hedera colchica 'Sulphur Heart' (Araliaceae)
variegated Colchis ivy
A large leafed ivy with light green to yellow splashes in the leaf centers, this evergreen vine provides a bright ground cover in shady to partly shady locations. Like its relative, English ivy, Colchis ivy will climb if it finds support, and it will also wander throughout the garden unless it is contained by pruning. Zones 5–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Hibiscus coccineus f. albus – white scarlet mallow Hibiscus coccineus f. albus (Malvaceae)
white scarlet mallow
This white flowering form of the scarlet mallow has the same preference for poorly drainage areas that the species has and grows to the same towering height of 6'–8' each year. Its showy, white petals cool off the back of a border in mid- to late summer. This form was originally given to us by the U.S. Botanical Garden (Washington, D.C.). They found it in Collier County, Florida. Full sun to partial shade. Zones 6–10.
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 21

Hydrangea macrophylla 'David Ramsey' (Hydrangeaceae)
bigleaf hydrangea
If you love Hydrangea macrophylla Endless Summer™, then you will simply love 'David Ramsey'. From early summer till fall, large 8"–10" mophead flowers with pink (alkaline soil) or blue (acidic soil) blooms cover this plant. These 4' shrubs not only produce large quantities of flower balls, but they repeat over many months. Originally from Stone Mountain, Georgia, it was named after its backyard owner, David Ramsey, and given to the University of Georgia in 1997. Full sun (keep moist) to partial sun. Zones 4–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Hydrangea serrata [Amacha Group] ' amacha Nishiki' – mountain hydrangea Hydrangea serrata [Amacha Group] ' amacha Nishiki' (Hydrangeaceae)
mountain hydrangea
'Ô amacha' has delicate lacecap flowers that look like jewels and are guaranteed to brighten any shady corner of the garden. Rounded florets are blushed with pink rounded pale blush-pink florets with darker flowers within. Hydrangea serrata plants and flowers have a more refined appearance and are overall hardier than H. macrophylla. Native to the mountain woodlands of Japan and Korea. This deciduous shrub reaches 3'–5' tall by 3'–4' wide. Full sun (keep moist) to partial shade. Zones 6–9. (2 gallon – available for pickup only)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 14

Hydrangea serrata 'Shishiva' – mountain hydrangea Hydrangea serrata 'Shishiva' (Hydrangeaceae)
mountain hydrangea
This charming lacecap hydrangea produces delicate lavender-blue to blue flowers. The specimen at the Arboretum was covered with flowers in late May and continued throughout the summer. It blooms on both old and new wood and is native to the mountain woodlands of Japan and Korea. Hydrangea serrata is similar to H. macrophylla; however, plants are more compact (3' tall by 5' wide), hardier, and have smaller foliage and flowers. Full sun (keep moist) to partial shade. Zones 6–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 10

Hypericum galioides × H. brachyphyllum – hybrid St. John's-wort Hypericum galioides × H. brachyphyllum (Hypericaceae)
hybrid St. John's-wort
One plant that has stood out beautifully at the JCRA in the District X Garden Club of North Carolina Wall Garden is Hypericum galioides x H. brachyphyllum. Throughout the hot summer months, it is covered with loads of tiny, sunny golden-yellow, red-tinged flowers. This is a natural hybrid between two southeastern United States species, H. brachyphyllum (Coastal Plain St. Johnswort) and H. galioides (bedstraw St. Johnswort). It forms an evergreen shrub to subshrub, reaching 3' feet high and slightly wider, with a somewhat mounding form. Its short leaves are thin, wiry, and an attractive glossy green. This plant, acquired from the University of Georgia, is sure to become more prevalent in the future. Zones 7b–9. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 5

Ilex rotunda – Lord's holly Ilex rotunda (Aquifoliaceae)
Lord's holly
This evergreen holly is stunning with its leathery, dark green, glossy leaves with smooth margins. Branchlets of new foliage are tinged reddish purple to burgundy. White flower clusters produce very showy, red fruit in autumn and winter. The Arboretum has had one growing in a somewhat protected location since 1996. This specimen is now nearly 12' tall. Full size trees ultimately reach 25'–40'. New collections of this species from Korea have produced more cold hardy forms. Previous collections were only hardy in Zones 9a–11. This species is commonly seen in northern Florida and is native to Vietnam, southern and eastern China, Korea, and southern Japan. Full sun to partial shade.
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 14

Ilex sugerokii – Sugeroku holly Ilex sugerokii (Aquifoliaceae)
Sugeroku holly
Sugeroku holly is a dense, broadleaf evergreen holly native to the mountains of north and central Japan and Taiwan. This medium-sized, upright shrub produces two solitary red berries that arise from each leaf axil and are suspended on red stalks. It has beautiful smooth dark green, oval to ovate-shaped leaves that are nearly 1" long. The stems of new growth are a deep red wine color. Unfortunately, with only one plant, no fruit will be produced. We do not know if these plants are male or female plants. Sugeroku holly is nearly impossible to find in the nursery trade, but we were fortunate to obtain ours from Rick Crowder at Hawksridge Farms, Inc. (Hickory, North Carolina). Test this one along with us for its overall adaptability to our region. Sun to partial shade. Zone 4. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Ilex sugerokii var. brevipedunculata – Sugeroku holly Ilex sugerokii var. brevipedunculata (Aquifoliaceae)
Sugeroku holly
Description is the same as for Ilex sugerokii (see above description). The only difference is that this variety has smaller leaves that are slightly less elongated. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 4

Indigofera kirilowii – Kirilow's indigo Indigofera kirilowii (Fabaceae)
Kirilow's indigo
A little-known but rather pretty shrub, this species forms great swaths of bright green summer foliage, followed in June and July by rose-colored flowers borne in 4" to 5" long, erect inflorescences. Grows best in full sun. It forms colonies 3' to 6' tall and wide and performs well as a ground cover on dry sites. Zones 4–7.
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 5
Number of photographs in J. C. Raulston's slide collection: 1

Lespedeza liukiuensis 'Little Volcano' – bush-clover Lespedeza liukiuensis 'Little Volcano' (Fabaceae)
bush-clover
Lespedeza liukiuensis is a newly named species brought back from the Ryuku Islands of Japan by Ted Stephens (Nurseries Caroliniana, North Augusta, South Carolina). As such, not much is known. Tony Avent suggested the cultivar name of "Little Volcano" because it simply erupts with flowers. It is unique in the timing of its flowering; when L. thunbergii finishes flowering, this one begins. Our potted plants flowered from late summer throughout the fall. The leaves are made up of three leaflets, with small, purple pea-flowers held in long sprays. The pods are small and one-seeded, falling without opening. They do best in a sunny position in well-drained soil, are easy to grow, drought resistant, and tolerant of poor soil. Hardiness is unknown, but we expect it to be hardy throughout North Carolina. (1 quart)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 8

Magnolia chapensis – Chapa michelia Magnolia chapensis (Magnoliaceae)
Chapa michelia
Plant connoisseurs will enjoy this rare plant from the mountains of southwest China and Vietnam. It has fragrant, creamy white flowers in late spring to early summer and handsome glossy evergreen leaves. This small tree is a member of the Magnolia family suffering from an identity crisis, previously named Michelia chapensis. The specimen at the Arboretum has been growing here since 1997 and is now nearly 15' tall! It should ultimately reach 30'. Often listed as Zone 8 hardy, only time will tell if it will continue to survive the coldest of our winters. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Magnolia laevifolia – shrubby michelia Magnolia laevifolia (Magnoliaceae)
shrubby michelia
One of the many members of the Magnolia family that has suffered an identity crisis, this fragrant flowering evergreen shrub/small tree has been classified in at least three different genera in the last hundred years or so (Magnolia, Michelia, and Parakmeria). Early spring flowers are fragrant and white. Elongated evergreen leaves are an attractive glossy, dark green. Magnolia experts recommend growing this plant for its "splendid foliage and outstanding form." The Arboretum's specimen in the Japanese garden was planted in 1998 and has reached a height of 6' in that time. Does well in shady conditions. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 22

Magnolia lotungensis – eastern joy lotus tree Magnolia lotungensis (Magnoliaceae)
eastern joy lotus tree
This little known rare Chinese member of the Magnolia family can become large in the wild, but is easily maintained at a much smaller size in cultivation. In its native Yunnan, this plant is cultivated as a street tree because of its narrowly columnar habit and exceptionally glossy leaves. Evergreen foliage emerges bronze to reddish pink, and creamy yellow flowers are fragrant, resembling the bloom of a water lotus. Although reports of hardiness in our region (Zone 7b) have been equivocal, the Arboretum has several plants (12'–16' in height) that have been in the ground five years or more. Full sun to partial sun. (4" and 1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 13

Meliosma parviflora – small flowered melliosma Meliosma parviflora (Meliosmaceae)
small flowered melliosma
None of us at the Arboretum know Chinese so deciphering a common name for this plant is challenging. Instead, we'll translate the Latin (meli = honey, osme = odor, parvi = small, and flora = flowers). This rare deciduous tree was one of the thousands of Asian plants collected by E.H. Wilson for the Arnold Arboretum in the early years of the twentieth century. Internet images of the tree's flowers are very reminiscent of Astilbe inflorescences, i.e., terminal, white, pyramidal panicles. (Who needs to translate, when English can be so much fun?) Expect this deciduous tree to reach 30' tall. These plants were propagated from a plant originally received from Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland. Full sun to partial shade. Hardiness is unknown, but they have grown here at the Arboretum for many, many years. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 10

Osmanthus americanus 'Woodlanders Amanda' – variegated wild olive Osmanthus americanus 'Woodlanders Amanda' (Oleaceae)
variegated wild olive
Here we have another great selection of a fine evergreen native plant, Osmanthus americanus. 'Woodlanders Amanda' is a beautiful variegated cultivar that originated from our friends at Woodlanders Nursery (Aiken, South Carolina). Contributing to the overall beauty of this plant is the fact that the amount of variegation is different throughout the plant. This evergreen shrub/small tree has smooth, attractive, elliptical leathery leaves. Creamy white, very fragrant flowers form in leaf axils in early spring followed by dark blue fruit in the fall. Its form is often shrubby with an open, loose habit. It is becoming a popular landscape shrub. The species is native from southeast Virginia to central Florida west to southeast Louisiana. Tolerates a wide range of soil conditions and grows best in full sun to partial shade. Reaches 15'–25' tall. Zone 5–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 15

Osmanthus suavis – sawtooth tea-olive Osmanthus suavis (Oleaceae)
sawtooth tea-olive
This rare species of Osmanthus is full of potential for use in our region, but is extremely difficult to find in the nursery trade. Osmanthus is derived from the Greek osme, meaning fragrance, and anthos, meaning flowers. True to its name, in spring, this evergreen forms exceedingly fragrant, small, white flowers in its leaf axils. This medium sized shrub or small tree is coarse textured with narrow, smooth, finely toothed leaves. Although it has not yet been extensively tested in Raleigh, the Arboretum's specimen survived three winters only to be found missing in October 2005. Enjoy this plant and evaluate it along with us (we're going to plant another). Other possible limiting factors in our area could include temperature, moisture, or soils, especially since it is native to dense forests or thickets on slopes at 8,000'–10,000' in Nepal, India, Tibet, southwestern China, and Myanmar. It is described as reaching 10'–15' tall.
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Persea thunbergii – Japanese machilus Persea thunbergii (Lauraceae)
Japanese machilus
Japanese machilus is a fast growing, large, evergreen tree with very attractive, green leaves. In warmer regions, it can reach 60' to 80' tall and 40' to 60' wide. The tallest Japanese machilus at the Arboretum was 6' when planted in 1996 and is now 18' tall. Insignificant yellow-green flowers are followed by purple-black fruit. Persea is a genus composed of mostly tropical trees and includes P. americana (avocado). It is native to Korea, Japan, southern and eastern China, and Taiwan. Grown from seed collected off plants currently growing in the Mixed Border which were originally grown from seed collected on the U.S. National Arboretum Korean expedition. Full sun. Although warmer areas (Zones 8–10) are still listed in the literature for winter hardiness, they have grown successfully in Zone 7 at the Arboretum for a number of years. Protect these plants through this winter and plant out in the spring. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 14
Number of photographs in J. C. Raulston's slide collection: 3

Physocarpus opulifolius 'Seward' – Summer Wine™ dwarf purple-leaf ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius 'Seward' (Rosaceae)
Summer Wine™ dwarf purple-leaf ninebark
Summer Wine™ is an exciting new and improved compact form of ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) that only reaches a height of 5' to 6'. Fine textured, deeply cut leaves remain a dark crimson-red color from spring until fall. Showy pinkish-white button-like flowers in midsummer with great red fruit in the fall. A very adaptable plant that is native to regions in North America. Created by Tim Wood at Spring Meadow Nursery (Grand Haven, Michigan) by crossing Diabolo® ('Monlo') with 'Nana'. These plants were kindly donated by Proven Winners ColorChoice. Zones 2–7. (1 quart)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 10

Pittosporum eugenioides 'Variegated' – variegated tarata lemonwood Pittosporum eugenioides 'Variegated' (Pittosporaceae)
variegated tarata lemonwood
There are approximately 150 species of Pittosporum that occur naturally. Of these, only one species is widely cultivated in the southeastern United States, P. tobira (Japanese pittosporum). It is popularly used as an evergreen foundation plant and salt-tolerant shrub. In looking to other species in this genus, we have come to test new ones for our area including this variegated evergreen beauty from New Zealand. It has light gray-green leaves that are about 2"–4" long. Each leaf is fairly narrow and is highlighted by a distinct white, wavy margin. Small, honey-scented flowers are pale yellow. The plant is so very unique in its appearance that it almost looks unreal. In the past, we lost one during the winter, so we recommend that you plant this in a somewhat protected location. Prefers well drained soils and can grow in full sun to partial shade. In its native habitat, it reaches 15' tall by 10' wide. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Podocarpus acutifolius – needle-leaved totara Podocarpus acutifolius (Podocarpaceae)
needle-leaved totara
Podocarpus are conifers from the Southern Hemisphere. At the JCRA, we are at the early stages of evaluating these conifers for adaptability in our region. Needle-leaved totara is native to New Zealand and can reach up to 30' tall in its native habitat. Here, in less than its ideal growing conditions, we expect more of a shrub or small tree. Its leaves are unusual, being straight, narrow, and needle pointed. They are green in shaded settings but a distinctive yellow-green in open areas. In fall, the needles turn a light brown and can have spurts of new growth tipping these branches in light yellow-green. Grow in full sun and sites with good drainage. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Podocarpus nivalis var. erectus – alpine totara Podocarpus nivalis var. erectus (Podocarpaceae)
alpine totara
The JCRA is at the early stages of evaluating podocarps for adaptability in our region. Alpine totara is one of the hardiest of the genus. This variety has a more upright form than Podocarpus nivalis, but is similar in many other ways. Alpine totara has both male and female plants, each with a slightly different growth form. Both forms are growing next to each other in the dappled shade of the JCRA Lath House. The female is seen as a dense, low spreading ground cover. Ours has reached only 15" tall since 1996. Growing next to it, is a male, planted in 1991 (6"), which is now about 2.5' tall. In fall, red "fruit" will be produced on the female plants, but only if a male podocarp is present. Sun or partial shade. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Rhododendron 'August Beauty' – hybrid azalea Rhododendron 'August Beauty' (Ericaceae)
hybrid azalea
This unique hybrid is a rare and simply fantastic deciduous azalea that flowers in August. Pink flowers cover this shrub when other rhododendrons have finished blooming. 'August Beauty' is a new cross between Rhododendron arborescens and Rhododendron prunifolium. At maturity, expect it to reach 6' to 7' in height. Partial shade. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Rhododendron ('Conversation Piece' witch's broom) – witch's broom hybrid azalea Rhododendron ('Conversation Piece' witch's broom) (Ericaceae)
witch's broom hybrid azalea
What a rare and unique conversation piece! These plants were propagated from an abnormal growth, called a witch's broom, that was found on Rhododendron 'Conversation Piece'. We expect that these unusual plants will be compact and dense. This is an evergreen cultivar with hardiness reported to be -10°F. Flowers occur late midseason with the predominate colors being purple and white. Enjoy it as it is, or consider pruning it into an outstanding bonsai. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Rhododendron 'Kokinsai' – Satsuki hybrid azalea Rhododendron 'Kokinsai' (Ericaceae)
Satsuki hybrid azalea
This Satsuki hybrid azalea is a small twiggy plant with fine, tiny leaves. Single, orange-red (0.5") strap-like petals create a beautiful flower in June. Discovered as a tiny sport of 'Kinsai', this is an adorable evergreen mini azalea for troughs, rock work, natural bonsai or miniature gardens. Well suited to growing in the partial shade of trees or in east and north facing areas of your garden. Zones 7–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Rhododendron macrosepalum 'Linearifolium' – spider azalea Rhododendron macrosepalum 'Linearifolium' (Ericaceae)
spider azalea
How many azaleas provide winter interest in the garden? This one will, with unique, narrow, fuzzy leaves that are up to 3" long. This typically small (3') evergreen shrub adds fine texture to a mixed border. Fragrant pink flowers are also spidery, with ribbon-like petals in March or April. It is native to Japan (south Honshu, Shikoku Island). Partial shade. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 7

Rhododendron oldhamii – Oldham's azalea Rhododendron oldhamii (Ericaceae)
Oldham's azalea
Brick-red flowers set this azalea ablaze in spring and/or fall. Native to Taiwan, a seedling selection of this species was a parent of the popular, repeat-blooming Encore™ hybrid azaleas. The habit of this shrub is branched and spreading, medium-sized, reaching a height of 4'. Full sun to partial shade. The American Rhododendron Society indicates cold hardiness to +10°F (Zone 8a). (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 7

Rhododendron 'Primitive Beauty' – hybrid azalea Rhododendron 'Primitive Beauty' (Ericaceae)
hybrid azalea
'Primitive Beauty' is a very beautiful Southern Indica with long strap-like petals of pure white. The very unusual and highly attractive flower petals spread out in a spidery fashion, similar to Rhododendron 'Koromo Shikibu' (lavender). Its eventual height is around 5' with a mounding growth habit. A real natural beauty flowering early to midseason. Partial shade. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 8

Rhododendron 'Shira Fuji' – Satsuki hybrid azalea Rhododendron 'Shira Fuji' (Ericaceae)
Satsuki hybrid azalea
This dwarf Satsuki hybrid azalea is one of the newer introductions with distinctive variegated (cream and gold margin) foliage. Flowers occur in May, and are variable, generally white with purple variations. Overall, this is a very worthwhile plant. Partial shade. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Rosmarinus officinalis 'Golden Rain' – variegated rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis 'Golden Rain' (Lamiaceae)
variegated rosemary
This upright rosemary is very distinctive with its attractive golden edged new foliage in spring. This golden variegation fades to green in summer, but returns in spring with the new growth. Generally, the older the plant the more visible the golden color. This adds another season of interest to its much beloved summer blue flowers. Performs best in full sun in a location that has good drainage. Reaches 3' tall. Zones 7–10. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Salix 'Rubykins' – willow Salix 'Rubykins' (Salicaceae)
willow
Red catkins in the spring make this willow unique. A very attractive plant even when its catkins aren't in evidence, due to its slender branches and narrow green leaves. Leaves are also interesting with their white midribs and undersides. This multistemmed, deciduous shrub has reached 8' tall and wide in a few years at the JCRA. Native to Japan and Korea. Performs best in sun and medium to wet conditions. Zones 5–7. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Sambucus nigra 'Eva' – Black Lace™ purple-leaf European elderberry Sambucus nigra 'Eva' (Adoxaceae)
Black Lace™ purple-leaf European elderberry
Black Lace™ is a real knockout with its lacy, purple-black foliage. Be one of the first to grow this new introduction (limited release in 2006) from Spring Meadow Nursery (Grand Haven, Michigan). Creamy pink flowers in late spring to early summer contrast nicely with the dark leaves. Attractive blackish-red berries follow in the fall. Sambucus nigra 'Eva' (Black Lace™) was originally introduced by England's Horticultural Research International at the East Malling Research Station. Deciduous, 6' to 8' tall and wide. Full sun to partial shade. These plants were kindly donated by Proven Winners ColorChoice – www.provenwinners.com. Zones 4–7. (1 quart)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 16

Serissa japonica 'Pink Mountain' – variegated Japanese snow rose Serissa japonica 'Pink Mountain' (Rubiaceae)
variegated Japanese snow rose
This relatively new introduction has been described as a striking, variegated miniature pink magnolia tree! Perfect as a bonsai or a miniature landscape tree. In Zone 7, we are at the very limit of its cold hardiness. Serissa foetida and four different cultivars have grown at the Arboretum for several years and survived the winters. Best planted in an area with protection from cold. Full sun to partial sun. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

Severinia buxifolia – Chinese box-orange Severinia buxifolia (Rutaceae)
Chinese box-orange
Chinese box-orange has been known and used for a long time, but it is still difficult to locate one today in the nursery industry. This evergreen is a dense, low-branching, compact shrub with small leaves on thorny branches with an overall "citrus-like" appearance. Small, white, fragrant, orange-like blossoms occur in spring and summer, followed by shiny black berries in fall. Its hardiness in the literature is indicated to be farther south (Zone 8a–10) than Raleigh. We invited you to join us, as we trial this one in our Zone 7b gardens. In ideal conditions, it can reach 5'–12' tall and 3'–6' wide. Full sun to partial shade. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 5

Sycopsis sinensis 'Variegata' – variegated evergreen ironwood Sycopsis sinensis 'Variegata' (Hamamelidaceae)
variegated evergreen ironwood
This rare cultivar will make a great addition to your winter garden. Each leaf has a wide gold to light green margin. Although still seldom encountered, Sycopsis sinensis is a very attractive mid-size evergreen shrub with coarse leaves and an upright habit. A member of the witchhazel family, it has small flowers composed of clusters of dangling creamy white stamens. It flowers in late winter into early spring. Native to China. Zone 7. (1 gallon and 3 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 5

Symphoricarpos orbiculatus 'Central Avenue' – coralberry Symphoricarpos orbiculatus 'Central Avenue' (Caprifoliaceae)
coralberry
This great plant with beautiful fall red berries was found between two old homes on Central Avenue in Madison, Georgia, where it was growing just beautifully in very inhospitable conditions. One day while landscape gardening, Rick Crown (Crown and Simpson, Madison, Georgia) discovered it in a very dry, shady location where it also had many competing tree roots. Rick explains, "I value the plant both for its vigor and for the fruiting branches which color up well by mid-November, and last well into spring. I find it is like verbena in garden temperament, in that it grows quickly and spreads (through rooting branches and ground level shoots), and seems to need to reinvent itself on a regular basis, moving away from its origination site." This very attractive deciduous plant has a mounding form and reaches 2'–5' tall. Makes a great addition to any garden. Full sun to part shade. Zones 2–7. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 7

Ternstroemia gymnanthera 'Burnished Gold' – golden false Japanese cleyera Ternstroemia gymnanthera 'Burnished Gold' (Pentaphylaceae)
golden false Japanese cleyera
This cultivar was discovered and named by J. C. Raulston, Ph.D., from a batch of seedlings at the Arboretum. 'Burnished Gold' is distinct in being the only cultivar of false Japanese cleyera that offers attractive bright golden-bronze new growth that ages to a rich gold color for much of the growing season. This fabulous evergreen shrub is best grown in full sun, but can be grown in shadier conditions too. Plants are highly stress tolerant and grow well in hot, dry, poorly drained or exposed sites. Grow as a specimen shrub, small tree or a sheared hedge. We like this plant so much that we made it a 2003 JC Raulston Arboretum Premier Plant. Reaches 8' to 10' tall and 5' to 6' wide. Zones 7–9. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 17

Ternstroemia gymnanthera (purple-leaf) – purple-leaf false Japanese cleyera Ternstroemia gymnanthera (purple-leaf) (Pentaphylaceae)
purple-leaf false Japanese cleyera
This is a rare offering of an unnamed purple-leaf form of false Japanese cleyera from the Arboretum. It is distinct in that the new leaves emerge a beautiful deep purplish-red. This evergreen shrub grows best and has brightest leaf color in full sun, but it can tolerate shadier conditions, too. Flowers are white to yellow-white. Plants are highly stress tolerant and grow well in hot, dry, poorly drained, or exposed sites. Grow as a specimen shrub, small tree, or a sheared hedge. The Arboretum's specimen on the east side of the rose garden was received in 1998 from Tom Dodd Nurseries (Semmes, Alabama). Reaches 8'–10' tall by 5'–6' wide. Zones 7–9. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 4
Number of photographs in J. C. Raulston's slide collection: 1

Trachelospermum asiaticum 'Hatsuyuki' – variegated Asiatic jessamine Trachelospermum asiaticum 'Hatsuyuki' (Apocynaceae)
variegated Asiatic jessamine
This flamboyant evergreen ground cover greets visitors who enter the JCRA at the pedestrian gate, showing off its variegated white, pink, and green foliage behind the Visitor Center (Bed Z10). New leaves are especially colorful, and in winter all foliage turns red. A diminutive ground cover at 6” tall, this vining plant needs full sun to grow and flower (still a shy flower, though), although it does grow in shadier conditions. It is listed in the literature as hardy only farther south (Zones 8–10), but so far, it has reliably survived our winters (Zone 7b). Protect these plants through this winter and plant out in the spring. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 13

Trachelospermum asiaticum 'Nagaba' – variegated Asiatic jessamine Trachelospermum asiaticum 'Nagaba' (Apocynaceae)
variegated Asiatic jessamine
The forms and colors of Asiatic jessamine are simply beautiful. Asiatic jessamine is a widely grown evergreen ground cover, especially prominent in Zone 8 and warmer landscapes of the southeastern United States. So far, they have reliably survived our winters (Zone 7b). Despite the popularity of this plant, relatively few cultivars exist in the trade. Thanks to our friend Sean Hogan (Cistus Design Nursery, Portland, Oregon), we have acquired this little gem. 'Nagaba' is a new cultivar with green leaves and a thin variegated margin. Although we haven't yet tested this cultivar extensively, it should survive our winters just fine. Grow this as a ground cover or in baskets for foliage interest. Asiatic jessamine is shy to flower (compared to Confederate jessamine, (Trachelospermum jasminoides)), and as such, you are less likely to have plants produce the sweet-scented flowers typical of this genus. Protect these plants through this winter and plant out in the spring. (1 quart)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 4

Viburnum cinnamomifolium – cinnamon viburnum Viburnum cinnamomifolium (Adoxaceae)
cinnamon viburnum
There is a place in everyone's garden for this stately and unique evergreen shrub. Although not widely available, this native from western China has been in western gardens for about a century. In 1993, it received the Royal Horticultural Society's coveted Award of Garden Merit, yet for some reason it hasn't become a widespread offering in the United States. This handsome shrub has year-round appeal, adding texture to the shade garden with its large, ribbed, leathery leaves. In late spring, pink buds turn into creamy white clusters of flowers borne on reddish stalks. In fall, there are bright blue clusters of fruit. Very similar to the more common Viburnum davidii, but appears to be more hardy. At the JCRA, there is one is planted outside the auditorium of the Ruby C. McSwain Education Center. Provide partial shade and a moist soil. Reaches 10'–20' tall and wide. Zones 7–9. (1 gallon)
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 3

Viburnum rufidulum 'Royal Guard' – rusty blackhaw Viburnum rufidulum 'Royal Guard' (Adoxaceae)
rusty blackhaw
As its name implies, 'Royal Guard' is a narrowly upright selection of rusty blackhaw. This tardily deciduous shrub is a slightly more compact form of the species (10'–20' tall). Attractive dark green leathery leaves (to 4" long) adorn this plant throughout the growing season and are a nice backdrop for showy clusters of tiny white flowers. Leaves on this multi season favorite turn burgundy to maroon in fall. Birds enjoy its blue-black fruits. 'Royal Guard' tolerates drought well and grows best in sun to partial shade. (4")
Number of photographs in the Photograph Collection: 2

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