Note: The JCRA launched a new Web site on March 1. Please visit us at http://jcra.ncsu.edu. This site, http://www.ncsu.edu/jcraulstonarboretum/, is no longer being updated.

Friends of the Arboretum Newsletter
Spring 2009 – Volume 13, Number 1

Words from the Director

It's a Beginning

By Ted Bilderback, Interim Director

In January 1977, about 18 months after J. C. Raulston's arrival, I joined the Horticultural Science faculty at NC State. J. C. was definitely my mentor through the early years. J. C. taught HS 411–Nursery Management in the four-year curriculum and I was hired to teach HS 051–Nursery Production in the Agricultural Institute curriculum. I audited a nursery course during graduate school, but J. C. taught me how to teach nursery classes. During the first year, I sat in on J. C.'s lectures and labs. A suitable textbook was not available, so written CliffNotes style lecture notes and articles from nursery magazines were handed out. Later, they were combined into a very thick course pak which students purchased at the bookstore. The nursery labs were taught at "Method" (it was not an arboretum yet) in the ground-floor room that served as the office for John Scott, the Unit 4 Farm supervisor. The classroom always needed sweeping, the chalk board cleaned, and tables and chairs set up and arranged. It reminded me of my early days in education, where a teacher was the custodian and maintenance supervisor, too. (I started first grade in a country one-room schoolhouse for grades 1–8 in eastern Kansas. If you are interested, check out this Web site: http://www.kansasheritage.org/orsh/library/bolton.htm).

J. C.'s vision for the area designated to be the new arboretum included moving some large plants out and installing new plantings. In 1979, J. C. assigned my spring HS 471–Arboriculture class a big job. Five of the Lagerstroemia fauriei (Japanese crape myrtles), whose crowns were becoming crowded, were growing in a row in what's now the West Arboretum. J. C. wanted to move one. The class dug the one in the middle of the row. The root ball weighed approximately 5,000 pounds. The soilball was burlapped, pinned, laced, and lifted with a crane onto a truck bound for the Horticulture Club's exhibition garden at the Southern Living Show in Charlotte. After the show, the crape myrtle was planted in a park in Charlotte. The Arboriculture class moved the red lace-leafed Japanese maple (Acer palmatum Dissectum Atropurpureum Group) donated by Carl and Nancy Ward that occupies a prominent space in the Klein-Pringle White Garden in 1980. The Japanese maple had approximately a 2,000-pound root ball. The planting of the Nellie Stevens holly hedge that separates the JC Raulston Arboretum from the Horticulture Field Lab was also accomplished by students over a period of several semesters. The field nursery was located on the lower south side of HFL where the Horticulture Greenhouses are now. Most of the soil from the field was excavated for construction of the adjacent beltline so the soil in the nursery was actually sub-soil and digging was disagreeable. Nevertheless, students learned the art of B&B, moving, and replanting large trees in the row along the Arboretum's border.

One of my visions while interim director is to involve more students in projects in the JCRA. I also have co-conspirators among the teaching faculty in the Department of Horticultural Science who are as convinced as I am that friendships for life are begun at the end of a round-nose shovel. Many fond memories held by our alums exist due to these experiences.

It is a great pleasure and honor to serve as the interim director of the JC Raulston Arboretum. I look forward to becoming acquainted with the Friends of the Arboretum. All of us at the JCRA thank you for your support.

Horticulture

An Introduction to Sex Expression in Plants

By Denny Werner, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Horticultural Science, NC State University

Some time ago, while giving a tour of the JCRA to a visiting group, we happened upon the beautiful Asian fringe tree(Chionanthus retusus) adjacent to Elm Circle. As I pointed out the attributes of this fine plant, I also called attention to the significant fruit set on the tree last year. During the discussion, I proposed some possible explanations for the significant fruit set, which was somewhat out of character for this specific tree that generally has demonstrated only light fruit set or an absence of fruit production in prior years. Ultimately, the subject of sex expression in plants arose in my discussion, and at that time, the interest level of the group blossomed. Hence, I decided to discuss this topic in my writing for this newsletter. The subject of sex expression is expansive, and this piece is meant to provide the reader with only some general and practical information in this interesting area of plant biology.

Higher plants exhibit a myriad of sex expression phenotypes. Sex expression refers to the sexual diversification that occurs in the flowers of higher plants at the species or population level. Most flowering plants produce flowers that contain both female (pistils) and male (stamens) sexual organs. Such flowers are called perfect or hermaphroditic flowers. Perfect flowers are usually associated with high levels of self-pollination. However, genetic mechanisms that control the spatial separation of the stamens and pistils, or differences in the relative timing of pollen release and female receptivity within an individual flower or between flowers on the same plant (dichogamy), can promote considerable outcrossing even in perfect flowered taxa. For example, many species in the walnut family (Juglandaceae), such as pecan (Carya illinoiensis) demonstrate dichogamy. In populations of these taxa, some individuals release pollen before pistils on the same tree are receptive (protandry), while in other individuals, pistils are receptive prior to pollen dispersal (protogyny). Both mechanisms tend to encourage, but not enforce, outcrossing. Another mechanism that promotes and often enforces outcrossing is called self-incompatibilty. Self-incompatibility prevents self-pollination (pollen transfer within a cultivar or clone), even though functional male and female gametes are produced by the plant. This mechanism is mediated by the lack of pollen germination or pollen tube growth through the style after self-pollination. Many of our popular fruit trees, such as apple and pear, exhibit this phenomenon. Mechanisms that promote outcrossing in plants are important in plant evolution, as outcrossing increases genetic diversity and potential fitness in a population, while self-pollination results in inbreeding, leading to a decrease in genetic diversity and a potential reduction in population fitness due to inbreeding depression.

Some flowering plant species (about 10%) produce unisexual flowers containing only male or female sexual organs. Gender variation, in which a species or a population of a species produces plants with both male and female flowers on the same plant, is called monoecy. Many members of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), such as melon species in the genus Cucumis, commonly demonstrate this sex expression condition. Conversely, dioecy describes a condition in which a species or population of that species contains separate female and male plants, such as demonstrated in Ginkgo biloba and many species of Ilex. Although these two general sex expression categories are widely recognized, rarely are circumstances that simple in biology. Many variations on these two general categories have been recognized and described. In monoecious taxa, the relative number of female and male flowers varies considerably between individual plants in a population, with some plants functioning primarily as males, and others functioning primarily as females. Variation in the strict dioecious condition is also common. A sex expression condition called polygamodioecy refers to the phenomenon in which hermaphroditic flowers are produced in conjunction on plants that produce primarily male flowers (androdioecy) or female flowers (gynodioecy). Both the gynodioecious and the androdioecious condition exists in Chionanthus, meaning that plants that primarily function as males or females can be recognized, but in both cases hermaphroditic flowers may be produced in variable numbers on each type, depending on the genetics of each plant.

Also, environmental conditions during the time of flower bud initiation almost certainly plays a significant role in influencing the extent of hermaphroditic flower formation in any year, but this area of research has been largely unexplored due to the difficulty in conducting controlled experiments examining such in woody plants. Recall that in most woody taxa, flower buds are initiated the summer or fall prior to the actual time of flowering (anthesis) in the subsequent year, so it is the environmental conditions in the summer prior to flowering that most greatly influence flower bud set and sex expression of the subsequent flowers. It is interesting to ponder the basis for the significant fruit set in 2008 on our Chionanthus retusus that historically has set low amount of fruit. One can speculate that the highly stressful conditions of extreme heat and drought in summer of 2007 may have promoted the initiation of a greater number of hermaphroditic flowers in year 2007 on our typically male tree, as compared to a normal summer with less heat and drought stress, leading to increased fruit production in 2008. You may ask if any experimental evidence exists to support this contention. Again, the literature is limited in this area, but some interesting studies have been conducted in redvein maple, Acer rufinerve. A recent study by Japanese scientists (reference 2) examined sex changes in A. rufinerve as related to plant health and environmental conditions. Like Chionanthus, A. rufinerve is polygamodioecious. Interestingly, these scientists reported that a dramatic shift in sex expression from male to female or bisexual occurred in the spring following a year of reduced precipitation and drought stress. Perhaps a similar phenomenon is occurring in other dioecious woody species also. This is an interesting area of biology, one that is ripe for more research, particularly in woody taxa.

Members of the arum family (Araceae) represent a particularly interesting group of plants from the perspective of sex expression. Members of this family are characterized by an inflorescence called a spadix that contains many individual flowers. The spadix is partially enclosed in a vegetative hood-like structure called a spathe. One well-studied arum, our native Jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum), often demonstrates an interesting biannual "sex change," where an individual plant can produce an inflorescence that contains only male (staminate) flowers in one year, a vegetative shoot containing no flowers the next year, and still the following year produce an inflorescence that contains only female (carpellate) flowers, or both staminate and carpellate flowers on the same plant (the monoecious state). This ability to undergo "sex change" from year to year is referred to as "gender lability." For an excellent review of the topic of gender lability, see the manuscript by Helena Korpelainen, Ph.D., (reference 1).

In Ariseama triphyllum, the ultimate sex expression of an individual in any particular year is a function of the genetics of that individual plant, plant size, population density, sexual expression history, and environmental conditions such as temperature and moisture. Young, immature (i.e., small) plants typically produce mostly male flowers; female expression occurs later in life as the plant ages and increases in size. Population density can have an effect on sex expression, both directly through biochemical interaction between neighboring plants and indirectly through the impact of population density and competition on plant size. Plants tend toward male expression when population density is high, and female expression is favored at lower population densities, such as at the periphery of a population. Plants that exhibit largely female expression in one year, and hence set a high number of fruit, often produce no flowers or exhibit only male expression the following year. This can be explained by the fact that a net drain on stored reserve (photosynthate) occurs after significant fruit production, and plant survival is jeopardized if the plant continues to produce female flowers and fruit in subsequent years. To ensure survival, it must reduce its reproductive effort by changing its gender to male or reverting to the vegetative state for a few years after fruiting. Hence, gender lability is an adaptive mechanism that has evolved in some plant species to ensure survival.

I would encourage you to include some Arisaema triphyllum, or other members of the Araceae in your garden, and observe these interesting dynamics in your own back yard. Observing and appreciating these subtle changes in the plants in our gardens from year to year increases our knowledge of the biological mechanisms taking place in our own back yards, and adds another dimension to our gardening pleasure.

References

1. Korpelainen, H. 1998. Labile sex expression in plants. Biological Review. 73:157-180.

2. Nanami, S., H. Kawaguchi and T. Yamakura. 2004. Sex change toward female in dying Acer rufinerve trees. Annals of Botany. 93:33-740.

No Lace Here!

By Tim Alderton, Research Technician

Ferns have been around for over three hundred million years, giving them just a few years to diversify into all forms and fill every environmental niche possible. Delicate, soft, lacy, deep green, glossy foliage growing in cool, moist shade: that is what we all think of the quintessential fern. Broad, undivided, thick, plastic-feeling, blue, or hairy fronds growing in baking full sun: that is the polar opposite of the quintessential fern. Many ferns, though, fit this second scenario! Oddballs, right? These un-fernlike ones fascinate me most.

I will talk about a few of these strange plants in the Arboretum as well as some we don't have, discussing ferns for shade to part shade. The first group is some ferns from the Polypodiaceae. This includes our native resurrection fern (Pleopeltis polypodioides) and rock polypody (Polypodium virginianum). Neither of these species is in the gardens because they are not easy to establish, but several of their relatives intrigue me and are easy to grow in your own garden.

The genus Pyrrosia is probably the most un-fernlike that we have. It is a genus that includes anywhere from 65–74 evergreen species distributed in Africa, southern and eastern Asia, and into the south Pacific islands. In the wild, they typically grow as epiphytes and lithophytes. Fine, star-like hairs are present on both the upper and lower surfaces of the typically strap-shaped fronds when they are young, and shed from the upper surface when mature. Only a few species have proven hardy in our climate, but there are others yet to be tested. Of the tried and true, there are three species that are becoming more widely available and should be used. The most common of these is Pyrrosia lingua. This species in native to China, south into Indochina, and is found on the islands of Taiwan and Japan. The fronds of the typical P. lingua are undivided, strap-like, and held upright on a ridged petiole along a spreading rhizome. Many selections of P. lingua have been made in Japan and China, emphasizing crested, wavy-edged, lobed, or variegated fronds. The next two species, P. hastata and P. polydactyla, look very different from other Pyrrosia because they have lobed fronds. P. hastata hails from South Korea and Japan. Its leaves are hastately lobed with typically three, but sometimes, five lobes that give it the appearance of a bird's foot. The side lobes are individually about 3" long and the central lobe is about 5" long. All the lobes are about 0.5" to 0.75" wide. The total leaf width is about 5". The underside of fertile fronds is covered in orderly rows of cinnamon-colored sori (clusters of structures producing and containing spores). P. polydactyla is native to Taiwan. It is similar in appearance to P. hastata, but has six to eight lobes on its palmately divided frond, fitting its name perfectly since polydactyla roughly translates as "many fingers." The individual lobes may be longer than that of P. hastata. Both P. hastate and P. polydactyla have short rhizomes that form a tight clump, topped in foliage that grows 6" to 10" tall. All the Pyrrosia like well drained soils and are unfazed by drought once established.

The genus Phlebodium consists of only four species found in tropical and subtropical America. It is very closely allied with Polypodium and is often included in that genus. There is one species, Phlebodium pseudoaureum, which we have been growing successfully at the Arboretum. P. pseudoaureum is native to much of tropical America and ranges into southern Florida. Where it is native, it grows as an epiphytic evergreen; but in all but the most sheltered of locations here, it will be terrestrial and deciduous. The fronds grow 12" to 15" tall and are a glaucus blue-green, pinnately lobed, and held upright on a rigid petiole. Double rows of golden sori line the lobes of fertile fronds. Fronds arise from a spreading blue-green rhizome covered in golden hairs that match that of the sori.

Another family of ferns, the Dryopteridaceae, includes many of the most common ferns that we see in gardens, including the shield ferns (Polystichum), wood ferns (Dryopteris), and the florists' favorite, leatherleaf ferns (Rumorha). These are some of the most quintessential of all ferns, but one in the Lath House stands out. Dryopteris sieboldii just does not fit in with the bunch; it is an oddball for this family. It is one of 250–350 species of Dryopteris found throughout the Northern Hemisphere. When I first saw this fern while working at Plant Delights Nursery, I almost thought there was a labeling issue since it did not look like any other Dryopteris that I had seen. The fronds are only once pinnately divided and have undivided pinnae (a division of a compound frond equivalent to that of a leaflet of a compound leaf). The edges of the pinnae irregularly undulate, trying to form pinnules like its fernier cousins, but it just can't do it, as they are all webbed together. The evergreen fronds' pinnae are arranged in three to five pairs up the rachis, with a terminal pinna at the tip that is 6" to 12" long. The texture of the foliage, when handled, is thick and leathery, adding to its un-ferny quality. A native of China, Japan, and Taiwan, it is perfectly at home here in the eastern United States, taking the heat and drought better than many of its lacy relatives.

Yet another family of ferns with some oddball kin is the Blechnaceae. This family includes our native netted chainfern (Woodwardia areolata) and Virginia chainfern (Woodwardia virginica), both deciduous species that have spreading rhizomes. Of the 12–20 species of Woodwardia, the cool one of the bunch is Woodwardia orientalis. This fern, as its name implies, comes from Japan and China. An evergreen to semi-evergreen with fronds that originate from a non-spreading rhizome, it has the look of a tree fern without the trunk. The fronds can grow 3' to 6' long, arching out from the crown. Emerging fronds are glossy and often pigmented bronze to red, which age to a deep glossy green. This is a somewhat ferny fern with fronds that are pinnate with pinnatafid pinnae. The un-fernlike character of this plant is its reproduction method. Most ferns have dust-like spores that float through the air and the lucky few land in a favorable location and grow. W. orientalis is a bit different. It produces spores in the same fashion as most ferns, but it also does more. It grows a nursery of small plantlets right on its fronds. In late summer and fall, small plantlets emerge from the upper surface of the mature fertile fronds, which then fall to the ground, and, if conditions are right, grow into new plants.

These are just a few of the shady characters that can be grown in our gardens. Many more are worth trying, like Coniogramme japonica, Asplenium scolopendrium, Lepisorus bicolor, and Diplazium subsinuatum, just to name a few. These all ignore that stereotype of lacy and delicate ferns. Lacy or not, another advantage is that deer find ferns to be inferior roughage. Try some of these un-ferns in your garden and confuse your neighbors.

Hardy Begonias

By Tim Alderton, Research Technician

To go along with my strange ferns, you might try some hardy begonias. I have been trying some different begonia species and hybrids in my own garden, as well as admiring them for years at Juniper Level Botanic Gardens. This past year, I planted one rhizomatous hybrid called Begonia 'Lime Swirl'. It did rather well in the neglect of my personal garden in well-drained soil in part to full shade. I dug a division last fall and placed it in the greenhouse, but left a portion in the ground to test. I have been pleasantly surprised when checking it throughout the winter months, finding that the rhizome was still firm and green with vegetative buds waiting to break when the warmth of spring returns. I also planted a few Begonia boliviensis 'Bonfire'. This is a tuberous species from, you got it, Bolivia, as well as Argentina. It has beautiful bright orange flowers. This is also proving hardy in the Raleigh area.

At JLBG, I have been eyeing Begonia heracleifolia var. nigricans for a few summers now. This rhizomatous species has large dark green edged leaves with a paler central streak down each of the angular palmate lobes. While Mark Weathington was in Taiwan, he collected a few species as well, some rhizomatous as well as other, more cane-like, begonias. These will be interesting to try in the landscape. I love trying these supposedly tender begonias that would not be expected to survive the winter. I am then excited to find them return. Have fun experimenting! I hope to try some of these out in the gardens in the future, so keep an eye out.

Pollination: The Major Contribution of the Honey Bee

By Charles Heatherly, Volunteer Beekeeper

"To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,—
One clover, and a bee.…"  Emily Dickinson

Poets have a special talent for giving stature to such a simple mystery as to why a honey bee gently lands on a flower, extracts its sweet nectar, and leaves with a grain of pollen attached to its hind legs.  It is an exercise of survival for the bee who manufactures the nectar into honey, essential food for the colony, and the pollen provides vital protein for the baby bees.

We first think of honey bees in terms of the honey they produce, which last year in the United States totaled some 150 million pounds, its wholesale value to the economy estimated at $150 million.  That is dwarfed, however, by the value of the pollination work honey bees do for our crops of fruits and vegetables, worth some $19 billion, according to a recent National Research Council study.

Honey Bee Value to Agriculture

Extensive studies have quantified the benefit of honey bee pollination to various food crops.  For example, we know that almonds, cucumbers, apples, avocados, melons, cranberries, asparagus, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, and celery are entirely dependent upon honey bee pollination for their seeds to set and yield fruit.  Blueberries and blackberries are 80 percent more productive with the aid of honey bees; grapefruits, and apricots, 90 percent.  Seven of the nine crops that provide half of the vitamin C available to the human diet depend almost entirely upon external pollination for the production of fruits or sees (oranges, cabbages, green peppers, tomatoes, melons, tangerines, and watermelon).

California almond growers must rent a million honey bee colonies to pollinate their billion dollar crop, for which they pay prices sufficient to entice East Coast beekeepers to truck thousands of colonies across the country and back each year.

Pollination is the process by which pollen is transferred from the anther (male) to a receptive stigma (female) flower part.  In its quest for sweet nectar, which is usually secreted deep within the flower, the honey bee coincidentally comes in contact with the pollen-laden anther.  As the honey bee maneuvers through the flower, it brushes the pollen grains across the stigma; hence, fertilization and seed formation occurs.  The rear legs of the honey bee are miraculously equipped with Velcro-like grips that bind pollen grains securely for the return flight to the hive.

One Third of the Food We Eat …

In North Carolina, some 10,000 beekeepers, mostly hobbyists with 10 colonies or less, produce $15 million worth of honey each year, but the value of honey bee pollination to farm crops is estimated at nearly $200 million.

One-third of the food we eat is dependent upon honey bee pollination.  We know that because agricultural scientists, in their effort to boost production of essential food crops, have studied the honey bee for eons.  Not so well known, however, is the impact of honey bee pollination to ornamentals, though we suspect it is significant.

Alfalfa, clover, and sunflowers are heavily dependent upon the honey bee.  We know that because their plants and seeds are important commodities. 

Honey Bees in the JC Raulston Arboretum

I can find no research that defines the benefit of honey bee pollination to ornamentals.  However, I am convinced it is substantial.  Take the Nellie R. Stevens holly, for example.  In September of 2007, when I first established four honey bee colonies at the southeastern corner of the JC Raulston Arboretum, there were few berries on the holly trees.  Last year, with honey bees in residence for a full year, the holly berries were prolific.  It should be noted that a late and extended freeze over the Easter weekend in 2007 severely damaged most plants and trees flowering throughout the state.

I noticed one thing about the prolific crop of holly berries last year that may be an indication of a visit by the honey bees: the berries are especially thick along a band from about 8'–20' high.  I have also observed bees in the Arboretum visiting plants throughout the year, even during mid-winter when there are no flowers elsewhere.

There is another side to the pollination scenario—the perspective of the honey bee who benefits immensely from the nectar and pollen available from the non-food crops, such as the tulip poplar tree, the most abundant source of nectar throughout much of the growing season in North Carolina.  The tulip poplar is found throughout the state from the coastal plain, through the Piedmont and even into the western Appalachia region.  While honey bees have to visit many small flowers to gather a full load for delivering to the hive, the large, yellow, bell-shaped tulip poplar flower is rich in nectar and sufficient to supply several bees with their quotas.

Another important source of nectar and pollen is the maple tree, which flowers in mid-winter, usually late January.  Most people, except for beekeepers, are unaware of the maple flowers because its flowers are tiny and have no petals.  Maples are very important to honey bees because their early flowers incite the colony foragers to bring in nectar and pollen, which inspires the queen to begin laying eggs, as many as 2,000 a day, for the quick build-up.

Aside from their economic value to agriculture, pollinated plants contribute a variety of ecosystem services to mankind, among them: water filtration, carbon sequestration, and flood and erosion control.  Nor should we overlook the food value to birds and other animals of the fruit and seeds that are a direct result of honey bee pollination.

Honey Bees in Decline

There are fewer bee colonies in the United States today than at any time in the last 50 years.  The number of commercial U.S. bee colonies declined from 5.9 million in the late 1940s to 4.3 million in 1985, and 2.4 million today.  The decline of honey bee colony health has escalated since the 1980s with the arrival of new pathogens and pests.  The spread into the United States of varroa and tracheal mites, and more recently the small hive beetle, have created major new stresses on honey bees.

The value of bee pollination to ornamental plants would be almost impossible to measure," said Stephen Bambara, Extension entomologist at NC State University.  "Any plant with ornamental fruit or berries and any annual plant propagated by seed, requires pollination," he added.

The honey bee is the workhorse of pollination.  When you see a bee on a flower in the garden, be assured she is fulfilling an important role, not only in producing the sweet honey we enjoy, but also in growing the food we eat. 

2008 New Plantings

By Mark Weathington, Assistant Director and Curator of Collections

The past year has been a great one at the JCRA in terms of getting plants in the ground. Regular moisture for most of the growing season meant we could keep planting from early spring right through until fall. Over 900 different accessions from sources around the globe were planted during 2008 throughout the Arboretum.

A major planting area last year was the newly created Xeric Garden, installed where the Southwest Garden previously stood and utilizing the mature specimens from that collection. Forty-one agave were planted last summer with 37 of them in the Xeric Garden alone, while 16 of the 17 yucca taxa planted last year were also added to this area. The Xeric Garden became home to more than just woody lilies though. Almost one quarter of the new plantings in 2008 went to this display of drought tolerant, water-wise plants. New taxa include rare conifers like Widdringtonia nodiflora (African mountain cedar), Juniperus seravschanica, and Wollemia nobilis (Wollemi pine) as well as southwestern and Mexican oaks, Quercus wislizenii, Q. berberidifolia, and Q. durata. Broadleaf evergreens, such as Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana' (dwarf silver-leaf New Zealand pittosporum), Callistemon brachyandrus (prickly bottlebrush), and Calluna vulgaris 'Golden Carpet' (gold heather), work with the agaves and cacti to make this a truly four-season garden, while deciduous flowering shrubs add color bursts throughout the season. Highlights include the rare native Styrax platanifolius subsp. texanus (Texas snowbells) with white, bell-shaped flowers, several Punica granatum (pomegranate) cultivars, and the large-flowered Chilopsis linearis 'Bubba' (desert willow). Bulbs and herbaceous perennials complement the woody plants, providing color and texture in both summer and winter.

New selections of popular plants are always exciting to evaluate. Different flower and foliage color, vigor, or growth habit can add a lot to the garden. Some of these selections include the ground covering Lagerstroemia indica 'Rosey Carpet' (crepe myrtle), the variegated Cyrilla racemiflora 'Spring Cloud', the respectively dwarf and fastigiate Ginkgo biloba 'Troll' and 'Blagon', and the cutleaf Hydrangea arborescens 'Emerald Lace'. Some of these plants will certainly add quite a bit to the gardener's palette while others may prove to be a mere flash in the pan.

At the JCRA, we're always looking for new species that we haven't grown previously. NC State University's Jenny Xiang, Ph.D., supplied us with seed for a couple of new plants from her treks in China, and we have grown them out and planted them on the grounds. Cornus eydeana is a newly described evergreen species of dogwood that we are hoping will be hardy for us here in Raleigh. We'll pass on more information as we learn about this exciting plant. Another new plant for us is the horsechestnut, Aesculus wangii (possibly the same as A. assamica). Either way, it has already shown some potential by retaining its leaves until frost. Other new species that we've added to the grounds include Phoebe formosana, a broadleaf evergreen in the laurel family; the beautyberry Callicarpa kochiana; and Hydrangea hirta, one of the five species, along with over a dozen cultivars, of hydrangea planted last year.

We hope you take the opportunity to come by the Arboretum often to view our constantly evolving and changing collections. Let us know about plants that impress you or about new plants that you think we should evaluate.

Future Plantings

This year is shaping up to be a great year also. Watch the master plan continue to transform the JC Raulston Arboretum as we plant out the newly redesigned and expanded Asian Valley. It will feature new selections of Asian plants as well as wild collected species from "the mother of gardens."  Other areas to watch for new plantings are the Lath House, Geophyte Border, and Conifer Collection.

Musings on "Great Garden Plants"

By J. C. Raulston, Ph.D., North Carolina State University Arboretum Founder

(Editor's note: The following article was discovered in 2007 in one of the boxes that remained in Kilgore Hall after we moved out in 2002. J. C. originally prepared it for the December 16, 1993, Christmas Plantsman Luncheon hosted by William H. Frederick, Jr. The article brought back many rich memories to the few who read it so we thought we'd include it in this newsletter for everyone to enjoy.)

In an almost weekly event, I am asked to lecture here and there around the country on a wide variety of subjects—many of which carry the theme of good or recommended plants for various purposes—"native plants," "flowering vines," "conifers," "most profitable/marketable," "winter interest," "screening," etc., with endless variety. In general, during these events, I have the luxury of 40-60 minutes to pontificate and an 80-slide reel of photographs to give a range of the plants I feel fit the specific categories of the moment from the "thousands of plants one can't possibly do without."

I've recently been put to a new and possibly ultimate challenge which has occupied much of my daydreaming and thinking time over the last month. In two weeks, I will make a 14-hour round-trip drive to do a "slide lecture" to a select group of plantsmen peers—with a major problem inherent in the mission. The requested theme is "hardy landscape plants of the HIGHEST GARDEN MERIT"—not "curiosities," not "esoterica," not "profitable." A tough enough assignment in its own right—but strengthened by the additional requirement of a limit of only five plants, and only five slides total in the presentation. AAAUUUUGGGHHH!!

The list has churned and churned endlessly (and will likely continue to do so until departure)—just what is "high garden merit"?—and how to divide them out? As necessary whittling mechanisms, I've decided they need to: be basically tough and not need pampering, with relatively low maintenance (little or no special environments, modified soils, watering, pruning, spraying, etc.); have interest or appeal over a fair length of time; that they have high ornamental value at least at some point (showy or interesting flowers, fruit, bark, foliage, texture, etc.); be "available" to the public (no use of my normal "I've got the only one in the United States" tricks); and be represented in my slide files with an excellent photograph (an ironic, but realistically very important part of "marketing and promotion of plants" today).

And to force myself to variety, there will be one each in the categories of: an herbaceous perennial (a major concession here, but necessary); a broad-leaved evergreen; a deciduous shrub; a tree (we needed both deciduous and evergreen categories); and a conifer. Which left me without other "essential" categories of bulbs, vines, ground covers, etc. Only five plants? How painful!

The Herbaceous Perennial
In one sense, perhaps the easiest, as everyone knows I know nothing about these "things that die to the ground every year." But I do have a variety of favorites, enough to make even this decision difficult. Amsonia hubrichtii was finally chosen as it has a six to seven month period of continual high ornamental interest (rare in perennials), is new enough that it is not yet in most perennial references (an American plant the English haven't grown yet to convince Americans of its value) but available in recent years through a goodly number of native plant and speciality perennial growers. There are 25 species of blue stars (Apocynaceae) native to the United States and Japan—but only A. tabernaemontana is common in the ornamentals industry.

A. hubrichtii is native to the American Midwest. It has beautiful, pale blue, star-like flowers in terminal clusters in early summer; very handsome, thin, linear, graceful, green foliage through the summer on plants reaching 2'–3' in height and 3'–4' wide; and, rare for perennials, a long, spectacular fall foliage color display of brilliant ginkgo-yellow fading to golden brown. It is easy to propagate by seed, rooting of softwood cuttings, or division of clumps—and is exceptionally stress tolerant with no pest problems. Probably useful in USDA Zones 5–9 (4?) and best in sun. (My five runners-up include: Asclepias tuberosa, Baptisia pendula, Calylophus drummondii, Iris siberica 'Caesar's Brother', and Muhlenbergia dumosa.)

The Broad-leaved Evergreen
As the standard background of the entire Southern landscape, with thousands of choices—a real toughie. But my choice of Mahonia 'Arthur Menzies' is an easy and comfortable one with its many merits.  In the mid-South, leatherleaf mahonia, M. bealei, is the standard representative of this genus—a fine plant in its own right. But in this large genus of over 70 species in the Berberidaceae family, one of the superstars is M. lomarifolia from Myanmar which can reach 40' in height, with long leaves up to 2' in length, containing dozens of leaflets, and huge terminal candelabras of yellow, fragrant flowers in midwinter—and sadly a USDA Zone 8-9 non-hardy species (at least long-term in Raleigh; we grow it as a short-lived woody perennial).

In 1961, a group of M. lomarifolia seedlings were sent from the Strybing Arboretum in San Francisco (where it grows magnificently) to the University of Washington Arboretum in Seattle for trial. In 1964, a severe freeze reduced this group of plants to "brown pulp" except for one seedling—which was subsequently identified as an accidental hybrid of M. lomarifolia and M. bealei that occurred by natural crossing of adjacent parent plants at Strybing.

'Arthur Menzies' (named in honor of "the most knowledgeable horticulturist in California") is intermediate in characters between the two parents. The leaves are 1'+ in length—longer than M. bealei and shorter than M. lomarifolia; it will probably be 12'–18' in height at "maturity" in most areas; and it generally flowers in Raleigh from early December through mid-January with showy and wonderfully fragrant yellow inflorescences to 1' in length. (Similar "competitors" in the Mahonia world are the several M. ×media cultivars from M. lomarifolia × M. japonica crosses in England—but these tend to flower later in the winter here.)

Sadly, it has remained a relatively unavailable plant except for local propagation and use in the Pacific Northwest where it originated. Although propagation is fairly easy by terminal or single-node stem cuttings under mist, this requires a parent stock plant for availability of wood, and plants provide low annual yields for slow buildup. It is available in small quantities from speciality nurseries with hunting, and, happily, several large wholesale nurseries in North Carolina are now in the buildup stages, using the half-dozen older plants in the NCSU Arboretum for propagation so it can begin to enter our local market in the near future. Useful in USDA Zones 6–8 and best with winter shade to prevent foliage scorch in periods of bright sun coupled with low temperatures. (My five runners-up include: Abelia ×grandiflora 'Confettii', Magnolia grandiflora 'Little Gem', Nandina domestica 'Moonbay', Osmanthus fragrans var. aurantiacus, and Viburnum tinus.)

The Deciduous Shrub
The musing on this category made me aware of how difficult the "long season of quality ornamental interest" is to achieve here. The truly long-flowering things like Buddlejas and dwarf spireas are of somewhat "fuzzy" ornamental interest. But a truly outstanding plant finally emerged from this sorting process—Hydrangea quercifolia 'Flemygea' (Snow Queen™)—oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangeaceae).

This southeastern U.S. native plant has large, showy, white inflorescences in summer which dry and remain attractive through winter, interesting cut-leaf "oak-like" foliage which has good fall color, and wonderful winter bark on older plants. It is tough with good stress tolerance once established and can be grown in sun or shade, has no insect or disease pests, is easy to propagate and is rapid growing with an ultimate size of 5'–8', and is long-lived. (My five runners-up include: Enkianthus perulatus, Hamamelis ×intermedia 'Sunburst', Hydrangea anomala ssp. petiolaris (staked and eventually grown as a shrub), Poncirus trifoliata 'Flying Dragon', and Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum 'Summer Snowflakes'.)

The Tree
A real dilemma here—how could I possibly bypass my much beloved winter-flowering Prunus mume, Japanese flowering cherry, that I've promoted for so many years? In a category with many outstanding candidates, it finally falls to the "long season of merit" criteria with less than wonderful foliage in summer. So, by "default," Cercis canadensis ssp. texensis 'Oklahoma' (Fabaceae) becomes the automatic choice. This superior seedling variant of the Texas redbud was found in the Arbuckle Mountains of Oklahoma and was introduced by Warren and Son Nursery of Oklahoma City in 1964. A small tree to 15'–25', with great heat and drought stress tolerance, with the specific landscape merits of a rich flower color of the darkest magenta of all redbud species and cultivars, and large, thick, leathery, glossy foliage so handsomely appealing one would grow the tree for ornamental merit even if it never flowered. It is useful in USDA Zones 6–9 and does best in full sun, though it will tolerate light shade.

The only thing keeping this exceptional plant from being one of the most widely grown in the United States is the relative difficulty of its propagation—requiring budding, and one of the trickiest of the woody plants to bud successfully due to its very thin cambium. So suppliers can never meet demand though it is grown more and more each year—and not that difficult to find now with a bit of searching. Recently, its similar "sister" plant, the white-flowering form of the same species called 'Texas White' has yielded to tissue culture techniques—so although propagation specialists have not yet been successful with 'Oklahoma' in tissue culture, it does appear possible to break this barrier to mass production in the future. (My five runners-up include: Acer palmatum 'Beni Kawa', Lagerstroemia fauriei 'Fantasy', Prunus mume, Salix babylonica, and Styrax japonicum 'Emerald Pagoda'.)

The Conifer
A truly impossible choice with the diverse variety in sizes, forms, and "looks" available—and additionally tricky with my coniferaholic partner Kim Tripp breathing down my neck to check my conifer "political correctness." "We've" finally settled on Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Prostrata' for some unusual conifer properties. This slow-growing, mid-height (to 2'–3'), ground cover shrub native to Japan can be grown in either full sun or heavy shade, has a very different "feathery" texture than the ubiquitous junipers normally grown for ground cover use, will tolerate poorly drained, hot soils of the southeast which do in many conifers, and, of increasing importance in the eastern suburban gardens, it is totally ignored by deer browsing on other garden delicacies.

It is easy (though slow) in propagation from hardwood cuttings in winter and the only negative characteristic keeping it from the mass market is the slow growth which precludes fast, cheap production for consumers. With the awarding of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Gold Medal in 1993, production and marketing of this outstanding plant should certainly increase. Useful in USDA Zones 5–9 in sun or shade. (My five runners-up include: Cedrus atlantica 'Glauca Pendula', Chamaecyparis nootkatensis 'Pendula', Cryptomeria japonica 'Elegans', Juniperus deppeana 'McFetters', and Taxodium ascendens.)

Only five plants? Absolutely ridiculous!

The NAPCC Certified Cercis Collection at the JC Raulston Arboretum

By Mark Weathington, Assistant Director and Curator of Collections

The North American Plant Collections Consortium (NAPCC) is a program of the American Public Gardens Association in cooperation with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service and the U.S. National Arboretum. In this program, institutions commit to holding and developing a collection of documented living plants according to professional standards of collections management. They share collections information with other public gardens to compare holdings and to identify duplications and gaps. This approach makes efficient use of available resources, strengthening collections through combined collaborative activities. This network of botanical gardens and arboreta work to coordinate a continent-wide approach to plant germplasm preservation, and to promote high standards of plant collections management.

Participating institutions undergo a thorough evaluation to determine their suitability for the program. Gardens must demonstrate exceptional curatorial and management practices, meticulous record keeping, and a commitment to the long term care of a specific taxonomic group.

NAPCC Collection
The nature of the JC Raulston Arboretum's mission, combined with its small size, means that the collections are constantly evolving as new plants are added and older specimens removed. Committing to the long term curation of a single taxonomic group was only undertaken after careful consideration of the limits this would impose on the dynamic nature of the collections. Because the aims of the NAPCC to make germplasm available for selection and breeding, taxonomic studies, evaluation, utilization, and other research purposes ties in closely with the goals of the JC Raulston Arboretum, we decided that this would be a mutually beneficial collaboration.

Cercis (redbud) has been an important part of the collections of the Arboretum from the start. The first accession dates to 1978, shortly after the Arboretum was established. While most public gardens have their share of redbuds, few have significant collections of the often hard-to-find species and cultivars. Depending on your taxonomist of choice, there are 6-11 species of Cercis and several other sub-specific forms. The JCRA currently holds 7 species and 40 distinct taxa with a concentration in the forms of Cercis canadensis. While there is very little replication of taxa in the JC Raulston Arboretum, the history of freely sharing propagules with other gardens and nursery professionals has ensured that replicates of our collections can be found all over the world. The stated goal is to collect all known species and subspecies for comparison as well as collecting as many of the various named forms of redbud as possible.

Considerable confusion abounds in the literature—and consequently the marketplace—surrounding the Asian redbuds. The JCRA NAPCC collection will help to clear up the taxonomic confusion surrounding this group of landscape-worthy trees and shrubs and provide propagules to other researchers and the green industry. Side-by-side comparisons of living plant material will enable us to develop keys for identifying plants. The collection will also help the JCRA's education mission, both to the public and to NC State students, as we impress on them the importance of coordinated and collaborative efforts to preserve germplasm ex situ.

Introductions
By the mid 1990s, two selections of Cercis had been selected and named by J. C. Raulston, Ph.D. The first, Cercis canadensis subsp. mexicana 'Bonita', was grown for its exceptionally glossy leaves with regularly undulate margins. The other, C. glabra 'Celestial Plum' (originally named and still sometimes seen as C. yunnanensis 'Celestial Plum') was selected for its blue-green foliage and loads of light plum purple flowers in early spring. Once thought to be lost from cultivation, this outstanding selection is making a resurgence. In more recent years,the JCRA Cercis collection has been used as source material in the breeding efforts of Denny Werner, Ph.D., plant breeder in the Department of Horticultural Science at NC State University. Over the next several years, he will be releasing new plants in conjunction with the JCRA. Plants coming out of his program in the near future include weeping forms with both variegated and purple leaves as well as the purple-leafed Cercis canadensis subsp. texensis 'Merlot'. We anticipate even more exciting forms of our native redbud to emerge from this innovative breeding program. The newest introduction from our existing collection is a Cercis chinensis that we have been watching for years. It is one of the very first redbuds in our extensive collection to show color, it absolutely covers itself in lavender-pink flowers, and is one of the last to finish flowering. The exuberant flower display starting at the very beginning of March and continuing through the end of April gives us the hope of returning spring and ushers in the "March Madness" of our garden's floral display. To honor the memory of Coach Kay Yow, we have named this exceptional plant after this remarkable women—C. chinensis 'Kay's Early Hope'.

Development

Planting the Seeds for Development

By Anne M. Porter, Director of Development

2009 Gala in the Garden

Enchanted Garden: A Botanical Fantasy

Sunday, May 3, 2009
3:00 PM–7:00 PM

Please join us for an enchanted garden party. Escape the everyday for an afternoon of magical delights and merriment … as you stroll around the gardens, perusing all the dazzling botanical and non-botanical silent auction items. The Gala is a perfect opportunity to enjoy the "enchanted gardens" and entertain family, friends, and business associates … while sipping on a cool drink and sampling gourmet treats. It is sure to be a delightful afternoon of whimsy and merriment to delight the senses—a Raleigh garden party like no other!

Honorary Chairs
Rufus and Linda Edmisten

Event Chairs
Cyndy Allison
Tori Callanan

Event Committee
Jill Adams
Cyndy Allison
Jayme Bednarczyk
Ted Bilderback
John Buettner
Tori Callanan
Kathy Deal
Rufus and Linda Edmisten
Carol Fishman
Larry Handcock
Barbara Kennedy
Charlie Kidder
Anita Kuehne
Marjorie O'Keeffe
Anne Porter
Jackie Wynne
Helen Yoest

Gala in the Garden Silent Auction
The silent auction is always a favorite entertainment of the Gala. Whether guests are bidding on outstanding and unusual plants, resort packages, signed memorabilia and books, concert tickets, fine handcrafted jewelry, or vintage scotch—it is guaranteed to be great fun and great competition! If you would like to donate a special item for the auction, please visit our Web site or contact Anne Porter at (919) 513-3826 or anne_porter@ncsu.edu.

Event Sponsors
The Gala in the Garden is the Arboretum's main fund-raising event of the year, with the proceeds going to support its daily operations of teaching, research, and public garden displays. Won't you consider supporting the JCRA by becoming a Gala sponsor? It's an enchanting way to entertain business guests or a special treat for your staff. For more sponsorship information, please visit our Web site, call Anne Porter at (919) 513-3826, or e-mail her at anne_porter@ncsu.edu.

The JCRA Flags

Ever drive by the Arboretum or walk up the sidewalk along the District X Garden Club of North Carolina Wall Garden and suddenly a burst of color catches your eye? Well, you can thank our good friend, Vanette McKinney! Vanette has been graciously donating her time, talents, and resources for many years, and the flags make a fanciful addition to our beautiful gardens. Vanette even added three pink flags at the front entrance in remembrance of NC State Coach Kay Yow. Thanks, Vanette! We appreciate your gifts!

Members Making News

The JCRA is extremely fortunate to have so many talented friends and donors. If you are a "member making news" or know of one, please share it with us.

On November 20, 2008, Cyndy Allison, owner of Willow Tree Landscaping in Raleigh, (and the 2009 Gala Event Co-chair) was recognized with the Residential Contracting Distinction Award given by the North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association. To learn more about Cyndy's garden designs and other awards, visit: http://www.willowtreelandscaping.com. Way to go, Cyndy!

Bland Landscaping Co. was also honored on the same evening with the Commercial Landscape Installation Merit Award for their fine work on the Oberlin Court Apartments.

Pam Beck and Tony Avent are the local area subcommittee chairs for the 2009 Garden Writers Conference, being held at the Raleigh Convention Center in Raleigh, North Carolina, from September 23–27.

Helen Yoest has a new Web site and blog that are not only very cool, but she also mentions the JCRA frequently. (Thanks, Helen! We appreciate the great PR!) Check them out: http://www.gardeningwithconfidence.com and http://www.gardensgardens.wordpress.com.

Something Worth Looking Into

Looking for new ways to support the JCRA … or other charities of your choice? This could be an opportunity worth looking into!

President Bush signed the $700 billion economic bailout bill (H.R. 1424, The Financial Rescue Package), which includes a two-year extension of the IRA Rollover provision.

Here are the highlights and limitations:
The provision applies to IRA gifts made in 2008 and 2009 (January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2009).
The donor must be age 70½ or older.
The donor can give up to $100,000 per year out of his/her IRA.
The contribution must be a direct gift to a charity (donor cannot fund a planned gift such as a charitable trust or charitable gift annuity with his/her IRA gift).
There is no income tax on the IRA distributions as long as they are directly transferred to a qualified non-profit.

Why This Is a Good Thing!
The IRA Rollover gives individuals more tax-efficient alternatives to support the charities of their choice—like the JC Raulston Arboretum.

Save-the-date for Open Days Garden Tours

By Anne M. Porter, Director of Development, with Garden Descriptions by Respective Hosts

The JCRA is excited to once again be part of the Garden Conservancy's Open Days. For more information regarding the program and to see the nationwide schedule of the 2009 Open Days, please visit http://www.gardenconservancy.org.

Tickets may be purchased for $5 each (or books of six for $25) at the JCRA a month prior to the Raleigh tour; or, during the event at the JCRA or any of the individual gardens. This is a wonderful opportunity to see many spectacular private and public gardens while supporting the JCRA.

The Raleigh Open Days will be September 19 and 20, 2009. The tour begins at the JC Raulston Arboretum and features the following spectacular gardens. Just a little something to whet your appetite!

Featured Gardens

Entwined
Phil Abbot and Jayme Bednarczyk
1025 Traders Trail, Wake Forest

Hopeful dreams entwined with patience and time,
Cherry trees bloom amidst whispering pines.
A hand-built home grew among fruitful trees,
Passive solar sited to capture the breeze.
Upon stone walls climbing roses scramble,
Interlaced clematis delight and ramble.
A south-facing room in need of a view,
To embrace the sunlight—geothermal too.
After clearing some pines, light and energy found,
Now a beautiful lake where habitat abounds.
Entwined gardens with curvilinear walls,
Terraced and planted, space to gather for all.
Plants for food, plants for shelter,
Plants for fragrance, interwoven color with texture.
Pathways meander, through a garden of splendor,
Hearts and souls are nourished and remember.
Villa and garden—with European appeal,
Hand-built passion entwined—the dream revealed.

Falls Revival
Jeff Bottoms and John Martin
12160 Falls of Neuse Road, Wake Forest

A historic valley provides the setting for this garden, overlooking a hillside cemetery, a quaint little church, and a cluster of old millhouses. Mature trees, remnant vineyards and orchards, heirloom shrubs, and a casual cottage style all help to anchor this garden in that nostalgic world. A backyard nursery, boasting a wide range of exotic and unusual plants, adds an unusual twist; here is a collector's garden with traditional roots but with a fresh eye for the new and different, fending for itself against modern-day environmental pressures.

Rose Cottage
Jim and Sharon Bright
115 N. Bloodworth Street, Raleigh

Rose Cottage is an intimate city garden located in Raleigh's downtown historic district. The gardens arose out of an old graveled parking lot. This once barren spot has been transformed into a lush and tranquil oasis of color and fragrance. It abounds with a large variety of plants. The garden setting includes perennial beds, a parterre filled with a annuals, a pergola draped in wisteria, a woodland garden, raised vegetable beds, a secret garden, and a compost operation. The latest addition is a garden cottage, as charming as it is useful.

The Paisley Garden
Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar
5237 Leiden Lane, Raleigh

Avid do-it-yourselfers, Julia and Alfredo's one-acre garden reflects their passion for plant collections displayed in a paisley pattern of color and whim that is still evolving. In the heart of the garden is a stone-bordered pond with a stream and waterfall. Gentle paths meander through woodlands and sunny spaces. A vine-covered arbor provides a restful sitting area. In the front garden, a new vegetable garden greets visitors. A propagation greenhouse, shed, potting bench, and compost bins are located in the garden nursery.

Helen's Haven
David Philbrook and Helen Yoest
3412 Yelverton Circle, Raleigh

Low boxwood hedges are used to create a formal atmosphere to complement the formal architecture of this Georgian Colonial style home. Within these hedges are informal plantings of perennials and annuals to attract butterflies, birds, and bees. Helen's Haven is a certified wildlife habitat and a certified Monarch Watch Station. Using water-wise design principles and watered with harvested rain, this organic garden demonstrates good environmental practices, resulting in a colorful, lush garden. Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the gardens, watching the butterflies alight and seeing enough birds to delight.

The Thompson Garden
Kathleen and Walt Thompson
119 Ravenna Way, Cary

The beauty of this suburban garden begins at street side where a path beckons you to enter and share in this preview of the abundant plantings that follow. The front garden is a delight of shrubs and perennials, showcasing a spectacular thread leaf Japanese maple. Upon entering the brick walkway at the arbor, you view a gently sloping garden with curved borders and pathways outlined with recycled concrete. These recycled concrete borders and retaining walls are consistent throughout the garden. Beds are richly planted with perennials, featuring a mix of native and specialty plants, including tropicals, all in perfect harmony. A small pond can be found along the network of twisting trails that lead through the woods to a community lake. Each area of this garden will elicit a sense of discovery and serendipity in plants, woods, and water.

Seasonal Celebrations

By Helen Yoest, JCRA Board Member and Volunteer

Friends Hosting Friends Anytime in 2009!

Last year on June 21, 2008, we began a new fund raiser for the JCRA. It was such a success, many of us wanted to do it again. However, there was a problem: how could we go to a party and have one at the same time? Plus, there were others who wanted to open their gardens in winter or spring or a holiday, or … you get the idea.

So, for 2009, we will host parties anytime! You pick the date, we will all celebrate! We will gather friends to host a party—many parties—across the state to celebrate the JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University. This celebration is to raise money for the Arboretum.

The party concept is the same; it can be any party of the host's choosing—it could be for cocktails, tapas, pizza, or more … it could be burgers, chicken, fish, and s'more … it could be cloth napkins, silver, and china galore … your home, your garden, your style, your taste … you set the time, menu, décor, and pace.

Each host will ask friends for a donation to attend. This set amount is up to the host. These parties will be in cottage gardens, patio gardens, rose gardens, and future gardens—each venue unique to the friend hosting the event, thus each donation unique to those attending! Invite your book club, garden club, neighbors, or choir! Maybe even your doctor, dentist, or secret desire! Delight with friends and host an event.

The JC Raulston Arboretum will provide invitations for the host. The host underwrites the party receiving a gift-in-kind tax deduction. The guest receives a tax deduction for their donation. The money raised will help support the implementation of the Arboretum's master plan.

Contact Anne Porter at (919) 513-3463 or anne_porter@ncsu.edu or Helen Yoest at helen@gardeningwithconfidence.com if you wish to host a party or need more information.

Annual Report

A Year in Review

The JC Raulston Arboretum is pleased to present the 2008 Annual Report, recognizing our donors, supporters, and volunteers. We extend a sincere thank you to all the individuals and organizations that supported the JCRA in 2008. Your support makes possible the continued growth and development of our gardens and educational programs. Plants and gardening nurture the human spirit and enhance our quality of life. We are honored that you have chosen to support this special arboretum as it continues to fulfill its mission of excellence in research, teaching, and outreach.

Members

It is difficult to imagine where the JC Raulston Arboretum would be without the support from our members, the Friends of the Arboretum. With the growth of our membership, we can continue to offer new educational programs, create and maintain our garden spaces, and inspire the community at large.

Philanthropist
William and Mary Joslin
Taylor's Nursery

Benefactor
Pender Nursery

Founder
Malcolm and Patty Brown
David and Catherine Duch
David Griffin
Henry Leon Lobsenz Foundation
Janet Leath
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks

Patron
Fox Hollow Nursery
Robert and Pickett Guthrie
Neil and Margaret Harper
Cameron and Dee-Dee Harris
Hefner's Nursery
Virginia Hester
Ray and Annie Hibbs
Deborah Johnson
Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar
Charles and Wanda Leffler
Kathy Mauney
Richard Pearson and Joan Robertson
Plant Delights Nursery
Redwine's Plantscaping & Special Events
Sampson Nursery
Carl and Janet Shafer
Sungate Design Group
Wyatt-Quarles Seed Co.

Sponsor
Ann Armstrong
Thomas Barrett
Bartlett Tree Experts
Jean Benjamin
Berylwood Tree Farm
Richard Blanton and Candace Haigler
Jeffrey Bottoms and John Martin
Donnie and Phyllis Brookshire
Dean and Gail Bunce
James Bustrack
Carolina Seasons Nursery
Currins Nursery
Anne Dahle
Johnie and Genelle Dail
Doris Deal
Jim and Betty Deal, Sr.
Dover Foundation
Risa Ellovich
Gardeners of Wake County
Curtis Kasefang and Sharon O'Neill
Mary King
Lady Slipper Garden Club
William and Melda Lamm
Robert Lyons
Donna Mack and John Stender
Ross and Margaret McKinney
Ray Noggle
Novozymes North America
Neena Nowell
Marjorie O'Keeffe
Outdoor Images
Panther Creek Nursery
Steven and Katie Perry
Piney Ridge Nursery
Pistole
Planning Strategies
John and Marilyn Ranson, Jr.
Ellen Robertson
John and Susan Rountree
Saunders Brothers Nursery and Orchard
Mark Smith
Lois Sowers
Andrew and Esther Spaltenstein
Swift Creek Nursery
Nadine Tope
Turtle Creek Nursery
The Unique Plant
Wakefield Nursery & Landscaping
Karen Welty-Wolf
George and Claudia Wilson
Louise Wrinkle
Helen Yoest and David Philbrook

Business
IBM Global Well-being Services and Health Benefits
John Rex Endowment

Family/Dual
Angela Abbott
Donald and Jo Ann Adams
Rosanna Adams
Stephen and Darlene Aleksza
Howard and Mary Edith Alexander
Chip Allen and Sharon Spray
Lloyd and Donna Allen
Gary and Deidre Alsberry
Tom and Jeanne Andrus
Bryan and Carol Aupperle
Dianne Austin and Robert Smith
Robert and Jane Avinger
Charlotte Bailey
David and Nancy Bamberger
Melba and Camille Barden
Kaye Barker
Sandra Barnard
Mark Barnes
Amanda Barnett and David Druck
Bill and Ann Bason
Llewellyn Beaman
Joe and Karen Bearden
Clark and Gwen Beavans
Jayme Bednarczyk and Philip Abbott
Harriet Bellerjeau
Robert and Angela Bergeron
David and Tammy Biondi
Richard and Susan Bir
Trisha Blaylock
Andrew and Elizabeth Blue
Blue Heron Landscaping
Lisa Bohlen-Admire and Parry Admire
David and Susan Boone
Edgar and Ethel Boone
Douglas and Mary Bowman
Brady & Associates Forestry Services
Olin and Laura Brimberry
Raymond and Diane Brinker
Britt/Grant Associates
George and Meriel Brodie
Frances Brogden and Chris Nash
Dorothy Brolin and Bill Sava
Brookhaven Night Garden Club
Curtis and Patricia Brothers
Brotzman's Nursery
Stephen and Amanda Browde
Bob and Mary Lynn Brown
Douglas and Adam Brown
Regan Brown
Charles and Lois Brummitt
John Buettner and John Dole
Barbara Buit and Bernadette Kyle
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
Richard and Nancy Butler
Paul and Joanne Byrley
Claude and Mary Caldwell
Lamar and Deborah Caldwell
Weston and Rhonda Caldwell
Bob Cantwell and Lydia Wegman
Wayne and Mary Carlson
Carolina Sunrock
Scot and Cindy Chappell
Arthur and Jean Chard, Jr.
John and Molly Chiles
Allen and Anne Clapp
George and Pam Clark, III
Haddon and Irma Clark, III
Brenda Cleveland and Barry Engber
Gerald and Theresa Clifton
Kenneth and Ann Cobb, III
Connie and Laurie Cochran
Coley Bunch Nursery
J. B. Coltrain, Jr.
Joshua Conn and Lane Green
Albert Cooke
Patrice Cooke and Mark Hughes
Gary and Christi Cramer
Kelvin and Susan Creech
Sherman Criner
Courtney and Kathy Crosby
James and Patricia Cross
Kelly and Patsy Crump
Bill and Mary Cruse
Marc and Julie Cubeta
Custom Landscapes
Diane Cutler
Vincent and Sandra Dabrowski
Dan Cochrane
Colin Daniels
Lawrence and Sara Davenport
Nicholas and Katharine Davies
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Alexander and Linda De Grand
Gus and Mary Belle De Hertogh
Robert and Ann DeMaine
William Dement, Jr., and Ed Sessoms
Steve and Martha Derbyshire
Mitchel and Cynthia Dickinson
Michael and Cathy Dieck
Danny and Leigh Dixon
Robert and Colleen Dodds
Drewry Hills Garden Club
Kearney Druken and Jamie Bollinger
Durham Council of Garden Clubs
C. J. Dykes
Earth Graphics of Raleigh
Bernard Eckhardt and Penny Amato
Elizabeth Galecke Photography
Tim and Shirlene Elliott
Environ Associates
Richard and Lisa Evans
Robert and Audrey Faden
Farmhouse Herbs
Max and Susie Faykus
John and Peggie Feddersen
Jonathan and Jaime Finch
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
Ken and Meg Finnerud
Greg and Debbie Fisher
Flower I
Myron and Ginny Fountain
Terry and Cynthia Fowler
Wayne Friedrich
The Friends of the Gardens at the University of Tennessee
William and Cindy Fritz
Matthew and Mary Furr
J. B. and Karen Gaither
Garden & Art Landscapes by Norman Rabins
Garland C. Norris Co.
Gary's Nursery
Edward and Margaret Glazener
Christopher Glenn
Jerome and Linda Glenn
Andrew and Sheree Goettman, Jr.
Danold and Marilyn Golightly
Alexander and Evgenya Gorodezky
Karl Gottschalk and Dorothy Pugh
Hank and Ellen Graden
Elizabeth Graff and Scott McLellan
Johnny and Pat Gray
Neil Gray and Lisa Ferguson
William and Amy Gray
Jeffrey and Sally Greaser
Grounds Touch Landscaping
Annette Guirlinger
Bill and Nancy Guy
George and Priscilla Haddad
Thomas and Susan Hadley
Gail Hafley and Chris Merrill
C. Michael and Eliza Hager
Porter and Marty Halyburton
Greg Hames and Katherine Violette
Whitney and Linda Hames, Sr.
Douglas and Susan Hammer
Philip and Caroline Hamrick
James and Dorthy Hardin
Paul and Dixie Harrell
Michael and Patricia Hartman
Guy and Sandy Harwood
Felton and Betty Hastings
Gerald and Barbara Hawkins
Charles Heatherly
Ruth Heldreth
Sylvester and Martha Herlihy
Martha Hess and Linda Breed
Tabitha Hodges
John and Teresa Hodorowicz
Karl and Pauline Hoffmann
Adam and Maria Holtzman
Harold and Patsy Hopfenberg
Donald and Loretta Hopper
H. Robert and Roberta Horton
Donald and Carolyn Hoss
Laurie House and John Hopkins
Alton and Ramona Howard
Charlie and June Hoyle
John and Joyce Hren
Stephen Hulme and Gloria Barnett
James and Jane Hunt
Gary and Susan Hunter
Jerry and Nina Jackson
Duane Jacobs
Karla Jacobus
Jim and Gloria Jahnke
Juan and Beth Jimenez
Von and Deborah Johnson
Cecil and Jo Anne Jones
Jason Jones and Scott Brandis
John and Linda Jones
Lloyd Jones and Jeff Cher
Bill and Margaret Jordan
Scott and Jennifer Justice
Robert and Barbara Kacin
Tom Kagan and Amy Mackintosh
John and Jane Kanipe, Jr.
Martin and Adele Kaplan
Kenneth and Virginia Karb
David Kelley and Jann Martindale
George and Fonda Kendley
Loren and Barbara Kennedy
William and Anita Ketcham
Charles Kidder
John and Gloria Kimber
Larry King and Susan Matthews-King
Paul and Phebe Kirkman
Charles and Amy Kneifel
Stephen and Nancy Knight
John Kocher and Britt Crews
Patricia Korpik
Charles and Peggy Korte
Jerod and Anne Kratzer
Anita Kuehne and Bill Swint
Ken and Betsy Kukorowski
Jack and Annetta Kushner
Jack Lamm, II, and Dan Gant
Lan Arc
Landscapes Designed
Richard and Amelia Lane
Richard LaRose
Alexander and Carol Lawrence
Herbert and Lynn Lawton
Darlene Lee and Steve Wales
Patrick and Marla Lee
Jeffrey Lelonek and Victoria Riddle
Terrance and Heather Lenahan
Henry and Jeanette Letterman
B. Frank Lewis
Betty Lewis
Keith Linder and Petra Bizikova
John and Ruth Lindsay
Paul and Cathy Linskens
David and Pamela Livingston
John and Becky Logan
Yale Loucks
Philip and Jamie Lovdal
Michael Loven and Duncan Smith
Ed and Gail Lowry
The Lundy Fetterman Family Foundation
Christie Mabry and Charles Garrison
Rudolf and Friederike Machilek
MACHO Garden Club
Robert and Julia Mackintosh
Kerry and Patricia MacPherson
Heinrich and Martha Malling
Shane Malloy and Tania Kwiathkista
Paul and Matylda Malocha
Bernard and Helen Mangan
Tift and Dabney Mann
Sarah Marano
Gustavo and Donna Maroni
Zermeena Marshall
David and Lynn Matthews, Jr.
Mark and Linda Matthews
Patricia and Patrick Mattingly
Daniel and Carolyn Maxton
Catherine Maxwell and Ben Fewel
Dan and Judy McConnell
Jesse McDaniel and Beverly Thomas
Al and Sheila McDowell
Jeff and Heather McKay
Richard and Dorothy McKelvie
Thearon and Vanette McKinney
James and Elizabeth McLachlan
Polly and Rachel McLaughlin
James and Ruth Mead
L. Denny and Rita Mercer
Carl and Terry Meredith
Ted and Jennifer Midthun
Mike Miller and Elizabeth Calwell-Miller
Don and Cindy Mills
John and Stephanie Mitchell
Ronald and Melissa Mitchell
Wayne and Jean Mitchell
Sharon and Jay Molvie
Thomas and Virginia Monaco
Edmundo and Susan Montagne
Frank Moore
Janet Moore and Jennifer Mercer
Donald and Verdie Moreland
Jacob and Jennifer Morgan
Richard Moss and Marsha Owen
Robert and Christine Mulder
Laddie and Edna Munger
John and Ann Myhre
Tara Nash and Jay Johnston
Norbert Nevid and Andree Allen
Mac and Lindsay Newsom, III
Lois Nilsen and John Rogers
Thomas and Jane Norris, Jr.
Charles and Beverly Norwood
Susan Nunn and Patrick Knox
Jim and Kay Nutt
Dale and Brenda Nutter, Jr.
Henry and Heidi Nuttle
David and Cecilia O'Loughlin
Robert and Charlotte Oehman, Jr.
Gordon and Alice Oldham
Richard and Erin Olsen
Paul and Betty Ossi
Jesse and Elaine Pace
Winston and Anne Page, Jr.
Alan and Rebecca Painter
Pamela Panchikal
Joe and Carol Paulonis
Sam and Linda Pearsall
Tom and Sue Peatross
Kenneth and Ana Pecota
John and Carol Pelosi
Daniel and Melissa Peoples
Amber Permann and Stirling Carpenter
J. Ryan and Kimberly Pfirrmann-Powell
Pine Knot Farms
Ken and Lorita Pinkerton
Pinkham's Horticultural Services
Louis Polletta and Graham McKinney
Positive Results
Kevin and Laura Potter
Donald Powell and Gina Bena
Troy and Lisa Powell
William and Emily Powell, Jr.
Stephen and Jenny Powers
Steve and Claire Pratt
John and Charlotte Presley
Ronald and Teressa Price
Robert and Rose Mary Pries
Austin and Cynthia Proctor
Holly Proctor and Michael Gloden
Protocol Sampling Service
Alfred and Suzanne Purrington
Charles and Marilyn Racine
Neil and Susan Ramquist
Tom and Amira Ranney
William and Mary Raufer
Frederick Ray and Liz Ball
Donald and Cynthia Rayno
Wade and Kathy Reece
Paul and Jane Reeder
Alexandra Reid
William and Margaret Reid, III
Laurie Renz and Connie Renz
W. Calvin and Nancy Reynolds
Rudy Riggs and Jim Phillips
John Rittelmeyer
Patricia Roberts
Charles and Kathryn Robinson, Jr.
Charles Rodes and Tina Belmaggio
Thomas and Linda Rogers
Robert Rossier and Eldred Hudson
Ben and Jeanne Rouse
Kelly Rowells
Thomas and Kathy Rucker
Judy Ryan
Richard and Judith Salentine
Joseph and Diane Sanders
Stephen and Deborah Santelli
David and Carole Saravitz
Kenneth and Sherri Satterwhite
John Schott
John and Suzanne Schroedl
Stephen and Colleen Schroedl
Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College
Walter and Bonnie Shackelford
Jule and MaryLou Shanklin
Robert Shore
Ian and Talmadge Silversides
Gil and Kathy Simmers
Nancy Simonsen
Sims Farms
Celeste and Chip Sloop
David and Krissy Smith
Edward and Sharon Smith
Robert and Patricia Spearman
Mike Stallings and Mitzi Hole
Kris Stein and Tiffany Weaver
Edward and Anita Stejskal
Paul and Kim Stephenson
Jane Stewart and Jim Ericksen
Ray and Rose Ann Stilwell
Gayle Stone
C. B. and Carol Strange
Sugarbush Gardens
Timothy and Leah Summerville
Edward and Janice Swab
Ann Swallow
James and Lynn Swanson
Rodney Swink and Juanita Shearer-Swink
Edward and Michele Szwedo
John and Lorely Temple
Nile Testerman, Jr., and Elizabeth Austin
Alan and Kathryn Tharp
Dwight and Susan Thomas
John Thomas and Dale Batchelor
John Thompson and Steven Kohn
Marvin and Ann Thompson, Jr.
John and Judy Tjebben
Alan and Beth Tonelli
Transplant Nursery
Jeremy Turner and Megan Garman
Gerald Tynan and Martha Stark
Henry and Nancy Unger
Mark and Jan Valletta
Adriana Vance and Cynthia Sawyer
Betsy Viall
Kristin Vitko
Robert Walko and Kathy Voytko-Walko
Steven and Michelle Wallace
Arthur and Jacqueline Warner
William and Donna Warner
Ralph and Pauline Warren
Frank Weedon
Dee Welker
Thomas Wentworth and Linda Rudd
Dennis and Georgina Werner
Tommy and Holly West
Thomas and Laura Whatley
Ralph and Cheryl Whisnant
David White and Janine LeBlanc
John and Jeanne White
A. Donald and Judy Wiesner
Fred Wightman and Doris Kistler
Bobby Wilder
James and Glynis Wilkes
David and Judiann Wilkinson
Bill and Carol Williams
John and Debbie Williams
Oliver and Julia Williams
John Williamson and Marilyn Ehrenshaft
Alfreda Wilson
William and Barbara Winn
Farrell Wise and Levis Handley
Wood Valley Garden and Social Club
James and Brenda Woodley
Robbie and Sheila Wooten
Worthington Farms
Richard and Amy Woynicz
Malcolm and Donna Wright
Susan Wyatt and Robert Kellam
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne
Wayne and Melody Yeargan
Philip and Louise York
Z Enterprises
Sandie Zazzara
Dora Zia
James Zieger and Rossy Garcia

Individual
A. E. Finley Foundation
Leneve Adams
Shirley Adams
Elizabeth Aiken
Anne Albright
Tim Alderton
John Alexander, Jr.
Ross Allard
William Alston
Amaryllis Gardens
Justus Ammons
Jaime Anderson
Linda Anderson
Susan Andrews
The Aquarist/Just Add Water
Arbor Enterprises
Arborcrest Garden
Archer Landscaping
Architectural Trees
Martha Ashby
Pamela Baggett
Helen Bahr
Susan Bailey
Eloise Baines
Nancy Bartlett
Marilyn Bass
Bass, Nixon & Kennedy
Sharon Bayley
Angelia Beasley
Anthony Beck
Pam Beck
Faye Beck
Bell Family Foundation
Alexander Belskis
Sylvia Bennett
Teri Bennett
Frederick Bertram
Stephanie Bertsche
Douglas Best
Beyond the Pail
Ruth Bierhoff
Caelia Bingham
Kim Birch
Diane Birkemo
Fred Blackley
Naomi Bloom
Howard Bondell
Matthew Borders
Nancy Bost
David Bowers
Leonard Boyle
Lucy Bradley
Frances Bradow
Misty Brazelton
Kevin Brice
The British Embassy Gardens
Virginia Brogden
Anne Brooks
Kenneth Brooks
Barbara Brown
Betsy Brown
Brown's Nursery
Louise Bryan
Mary Lou Bryant
Twila Buffington
Wayne Buhler
A. J. Bullard, Jr.
Jean Burda
Allen Bush
Carrie Bylina
Anne Calta
Camellia Forest Nursery
Lori Campbell
Lynn Canada
Kerry Carlin
Carolina Country Club
Carla Carpenter
Beverly Carr
Frances Cates
Katherine Chambers
Pamela Chance
Linda Chappell
Michael Chelednik
Bernadette Clark
Cristine Clemons
Clemson Extension, Aiken County
Clemson Extension, Sumter County
Beth Cleveland
Cline Design Associates
Bruce Clodfelter
Joan Cobb
Kevin Cochran
Rebecca Collis
Eileen Conklin
Matt Conley
Melinda Corn
Cottage Garden Landscaping
Dale Cousins
Kirtley Cox
Tom Cox
Gretchen Cozart
Nancy Creamer
Larry Creech
Lynda Creutzburg
Linda Crocker
Margaret Crooks
Chicita Culberson
Cure Nursery
Frank Currin
Sophie Dangtran
Michael Daniels
Sandra Daniels
Dorothy Darr
Cathy Davis
Gay Davis
Jinnie Davis
Nancy Doubrava
Kaye Denning
Becky Desjardins
Lacy Dick
Dominion Landscaping
Alexander Donaldson
Catherine Donleycott
Cynthia Dowdy
Dennis Drehmel
Darrin Duling
Carol Durham
Jared Dutton
Wendy Elliott
J. Brett Elmore
Anne Elwell
Mitch Eudy
Ervin Evans
Mary Lou Eycke
Terri Fairley
Fairview Nursery
Paul Fantz
Faust Nursery
Debbie Ferguson
Robert Ferone
Mike Ferrell
Karen Filipski
Martha Finkel
Margaret Fisher
Fishing Creek Tree Farm
Dennis Flood
Roland Flory
Forbes Landscaping
Kathryn Fort
Frank's Perennial Border
Angela French
Friendly Garden Club
Catherine Gaertner
Alan Galloway
Kevin Gantt
The Garden Collection
The Garden Hut
Gardens by Design
Gary Jewell & Co.
Gary R. Keim
Vince Gentry
Jeanette Germaine
Nathan Gilliatt
Kathleen Glenister
Goddin Landscape & Maintenance
James Godwin
Ann Goebel
Marilyn Golightly
Goodson & Associates
Victor Gordon
Patricia Grady
Elizabeth Graham
Ron Grainger
Green Prints
Noel Griffin
Claudia Gunning
Walter Gutierrez
Kathy Hafer
Jenny Haire
Jane Hallberg
DeWitt Hamilton
Debbie Hamrick
Carolyn Happer
Irma Hardy
Judy Harmon
B. H. Harrell, Jr.
Maria Harrison
Everette Hartzog
Karen Hatcher
Kim Hawks
James Haywood
Deane Heenan
John Hefner
Marcy Hege
Cynthia Heinlein
Jenny Helms
Margaret Helms
Carol Henderson
Warren Henderson
Anderson Hensley
Peggy Herbert
Christopher Herbstritt
Leslie Herndon
Ellen Herron
Angela Hertzberg
Benjie Hester
Hicks Landscape Contractors
Robert Hinson
Hoffman Nursery
Paul Hoffman
Carol Hogue
Bradley Holland
David Holland
Marcia Hollis
Hedy Hollyfield
Chip Hope
Horticulture
Hal House
Angela Houston
Ann Howell
W. Brian Howell
Patrice Hubert
Thomas Hudak
Patricia Hudson
Thomas Hunter, Jr.
Gail Ingram
J'Nell Bryson Landscape Architecture
Meredith Jackson
Linda Jaeger
Adrienne Jalowsky
Kata Jenkins
Edwin Jenkins
Jere's Landscaping
Miriam Jernigan
Ellen Johnson
Kimberly Johnson
Janice Johnson
Ozzie Johnson, Jr.
Opal Johnson
Johanna Jones
Sherry Jones
Shirley Jones
Blanche Jones
James Jordan, Jr.
K. E. P. Landscaping
Kristine Kahn
Wendy Kanable
Delores Kastanes
Cheryl Kearns
Sheila Kellogg
Ellen Kelly
Mary Kelly
Olivia Kemp
Frances Kerr
Doris Kester
Tim Ketchie
Virgie Kinch
Jennette King
Ellen Kinnee
Marlene Kinney
Lyla Kloos
Margot Knepp
Knot Hill Flower Farm
Valerie Knowlton
Faye Koonce
Charles Kronberg
Diane Kuzdrall
L. A. Reynolds Garden Showcase
Thomas Lamb
Josephine Lamberto
Jason Lattier
Ann Lawhon
Virginia Lawler
George Laws, Jr.
Linda Lawson
Lee's Landscape Solutions
Wyatt LeFever
Carolyn Leith
Eric Lentz
Robin Leonard
Virginia Leone
Nancy Lerner
Elizabeth Levine
Seth Levkoff
Denis Levy
Susan Lewis
Cynthia Lincoln
Betsy Lindemuth
Elsa Liner
Carolyn Littles
Lorayne Locke
Longwood Gardens
Elizabeth Lord
Ruth Love
Eileen Lowenbach
Harry Luther
Karen Lynch
Alan MacIntyre
Pat Madariaga
Connie Maes
Nona Malcom
Alison Martin
P. Howard Massey, Jr.
Christina Mast
Susan Mastro
Michael Matthews
McCorkle Nurseries
Ida McCullers
Andy McDaniel, Jr.
James McDonald
Alberta McKay
Mimi McKinney
Carol McKnight
Gail McLean
Rosalind McMillan
Carol McNeel
Steva McNulty
Thomas Melby
Larry Mellichamp
Binks Mew
Meyer Orthodontics
Peggy Meyer
James Mickle
Leonard Miller
Marlyn Miller
James Minor
Georgia Mixon
Kristen Monahan
Jeffery Morton
Joel Mowrey
William Muller, III
Michael Murray
Cora Musial
Mary Musson
Mary Jo Muzzey
The Nature of Art
Nature's Art by Susan Aldworth
Laura Neely
Rebeccah Neff
Sally Newman
Brian Nichol
Sherry Nicholson
Night Magic
Elizabeth Norval
Hughen Nourse
Janis Nutt
Mary Elizabeth O'Connor
Maggie O'Connor
Nancy O'Larnic
Elizabeth Olander
Old Courthouse Nursery and Mac Farms
Diane Olson
Oneida Partners
Ed Osborne
Outfall Farms
James Overcash, Jr.
Elizabeth Page
Astrid Parker
Ginny Parker
Kathryn Parker
Michael Parker
Parkway Lawn Maintenance
David Paschal
Jesse Perry
Elizabeth Pflaum
Mary Pierce
Betty Pipes
Pleasant Gardens
Patricia Poe
Catherine Poff
Mary Ann Poole
Anne Porter
Dixie Porter
Gail Powell
Jeffrey Preddy
Elizabeth Pringle
Progress Energy Service Co.
Patricia Rago
Raleigh Garden Club
Terri Rash
Rachel Rawls
Graham Ray
Cindy Rayno
Lucinda Reams
Carol Reaves
Kirsten Reberg-Horton
Redbud Designs
Kathleen Redfern
Shannon Renard
Renz Landscape & Irrigation
Katherine Reynolds
Page Richardson
Willa Richardson
Jessica Rigouard
Sarah Rigouard
Margot Rochester
Jennifer Rock
Jeanine Rogers
Louise Rogers
Susan Rollins
Stephanie Romelczyk
Michelle Rose
Elizabeth Rovins
Roanne Rowan
Chris Rowland
Bette Roy
The Royal Gardens
Mike Ruck
Jean Rundquist
Sadlack's Heroes
Sanford Dermatology
Carol Sass
Harriet Sato
Mary Sawyer
Aaron Schettler
James Schlitt
David Schreiber
The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College
Jim Seaman
Rebekah Sedaca
Tatiana Seltzman
Julie Shambaugh
Beth Sheffield
James Sherwood, Jr.
Julia Shields
Kay Shiflett
Jane Shipman
Carol Shores
Sally Siggens
Jeanne Silvey
Susan Sink
Elaine Sisko
Chris Smith
Jane Smith
Pamela Smith
Sandra Smith-Piccirillo
Joanna Smothers
Layne Snelling
SOD
Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance
Southern Green
Southern Horizons Landscaping
Michael Spafford
Diane Spotz
Spring Branch Landscapes
Jeff Springer
Judy Springer
Andrea Sprott
Priscilla Sprunt
Eileen Stahl
C. F. Stallings, Jr.
Carolyn Stallings
Annabelle Stein
Sondra Stein
Flo Stein-Bolton
Marian Stephenson
Mary Wilson Stewart
Jane Stikeleather
Dana Stockwell
Marjorie Strawn
John Suddath
Edna Suggs
Marguerite Summers
Betty Sutton
Swanson & Associates
David Tarpy
Beverly Taylor
Myra Taylor
Isabel Taylor
Patricia Taylor
Cherlynn Tchir
Sharon Thompson
Carol Thomsen
Christine Thomson
Trenna's Landscape Design
Charmane Truesdell
Lynda Turbeville
Valerie Tyson
Karen Untz
Cat Valand
Paulette Van de Zande
Emily Vanderweide
Kathy Violette
Wake Premier Landscape
Lynda Waldrep
Chris Walker
Daryl Walker
Ellen Wall
Jay Warfield
Donna Watkins
Mark Weathington
W. Scott Weathington
Barbara Weaver
Apryl Webb
Patricia Weisbrodt
George Wellons
Erin Weston
Noel Weston
Linda Wharton
Elisabeth Wheeler
Robert Whisnant
Carolyn White
Wilda Whitley
Brenda Wilkens
Jonathan Wilkerson
Sheila Wilkerson
Laura Willer
Anne Williams
Ross Williams
James Wilson, Jr.
Jan Wilson
Lindie Wilson
Susan Wilson
Fred Winterowd
Stephen Wirth
Paula Woodall
Nancy Woods
Jewel Wynns
Anna Yarborough
Susan Yarger
John Yelvington, Jr.
Charles Young
Dana Zamiara

Student
Trevor Anderson
Michelle Baudanza
Justin Beers
Rose Caldwell
Bradley Cole
Cari Corbett
Minda Daughtry
Jonathan Gluck
Marie Green
Colin Lickwar
Rick McGirt
Rebecca Myers
Leonel Nino, Jr.
Lindsay Ruderman
Nancy Santagata
Chaula Shah
Susan Hovis Smith
Andrew Stieneke
Tasker Du
Catie Valletta
Nicholas Valletta
Erica Washington
Jason Weathington
Kent Wood

Gifts to the Arboretum

A heartfelt thanks to these donors who gave special gifts to the Arboretum over and above membership.

A. E. Finley Foundation
Michael and Lee Abbott
Allen and Betty Adams
Jill Adams
Roger and Donna Adams
Rosanna Adams
Elizabeth Aiken
Anne Albright
Tim Alderton
Howard and Mary Edith Alexander
Ross Allard
Karen-Marie Allen
Anonymous (7)
Amaryllis Gardens
Ann Marie Amico
Sachin Anchan and Shruti Simha
Linda Anderson
W. Clark and Lorraine Anderson
Robert and Evelyn Andrews
Clay Andrews
Thomas Andrews
Appalachian Trees
Arbor Enterprises
William and Ellen Archer, III
Joseph and Sarah Archie
William Arnold
Asbury Station Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
Richard and Linda Atwell
Ann Avent
Robert and Jane Avinger
Mary and William Babcock
James Baggett
Bruce and Gretchen Bailey
Wanda Bailey
Susan Balfour
Bruce and Tonya Banbury
Keith and Annette Bandy
Suzanne Barham
Patrick Barkley
Bill and Carol Barmann
William and Elizabeth Barnett, Jr.
Rolin Barrett
Bruce and Mary Barron
Elsie and Rodger Barrow
Lori Bartley
Arthur and Clare Bass
W. E. and Debbie Batson
Angelia Beasley
Michael and Pam Beck
Jayme Bednarczyk and Philip Abbott
Bell Family Foundation
Robert and Meredith Bell, III
Harriet Bellerjeau
Stephanie Bertsche
Donald Betts
Ann Betzold
Biltmore Estate Brands Group
Jim and Audrey Black
William and Holly Blanton
Bloomsbury Garden Club
James and Linda Blount
Thomas and Elizabeth Bodenstine
Rick and Betty Boggs
Charles and Mary Bolton
Richard and Pamela Bostic
Jeffrey Bottoms and John Martin
Ann Boyd
Frances Bradow
Anne Bradshaw
Ashlyn Bradshaw
Brady & Associates Forestry Services
Joseph Brady, Jr.
Judith Bratton
Theresa Brett
Phillip and Susan Bridges
James and Linda Bright
Olin and Laura Brimberry
Daniel Brinkley
Leigh Brinkley
Brookhaven Night Garden Club
Brotzman's Nursery
David and Sandra Brown
Malcolm and Patty Brown
Charles and Lois Brummitt
Robert and Geraldine Bryan
Elizabeth Buford and Donald Mathews
Cynthia Bulka
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
Tommy and Linda Bunn
Laurinda and Dan Burleson
Philip Burton
James Bustrack
Andy and Sarah Butler
John Byrne
Jeff and Ann Calamos
Rose Caldwell
William Brian Caldwell
Scott and Barbara Cardais
Carolina Gardener
Carolina Trace Garden Club
Sheri Castle
Adam Cave
Joan Caviness and Scot Huber
Pamela Chance
Chapel Hill Garden Club
Ray and Jean Cheely
Robert and Carolyn Chipman
Christa Faut Gallery
Thomas and Virgilia Church, Jr.
Tim and Carroll Clancy
Bernadette Clark
Susan Clark
Clearscapes
Beth Cleveland
Bruce Clodfelter
Connie and Laurie Cochran
Colony Woods Garden Club
Michael and Suzanne Comstock
Contrast Creative
Mark and Susan Cook
Grady Cooper, Jr.
Charles and Helga Copello
Winifred Coppedge
Amy Cotter
William and Kelli Cotter
Anthony and Susan Cottle
Robert Courts
Dale Cousins
Barbara Cox
Jack and Micki Cox, Jr.
Gary and Christi Cramer
Gregory and Martha Crampton
David Crawford, III, and Lee Moore-Crawford
James Crawford, Jr.
James Crites
Tammie Crosier
Harriett Crow
Pamela Crown
Tonia Crumpton
Chicita Culberson
Jan Cumberworth
Derek and Patricia Currin
Robert and Anne Currin
Robert and Barbara D'Antonio
Steven and Jane Dabrowski
Vincent and Sandra Dabrowski
Johnie and Genelle Dail
Sophie Dangtran
Larry Daniel
Steve Darnell
Darryl's Hair Design
Davidson Garden Club
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Edward Davis, Jr.
Gloria Davis
Louis and Jane Davis
Henri Dawkins
Gus and Mary Belle De Hertogh
Foster and Maureen De La Houssaye
Jane Deacle
James and Kathryn Deal, Jr.
Ralph Dean and Nancy Doubrava
Patricia Deboer
Robin Dedrick
Stuart and Deede Deibel
Lance and Lenore Deutch
Anthony and Lacy Dick
Charles Dickerson, Jr.
Laura Dillard
Starke and Angela Dillard
James and Judythe Dingfelder
Robert and Colleen Dodds
Sean Doig
John Dole
Alexander and Georgia Donaldson
Jeffrey Drum
David Dubow and Georganne Narron
Bill and Ann Duke
Karen Duke
Mike and Melody Duncan
Nancy Duncan
Elizabeth Dupree
Ginger Dusenbury
Haskell Eargle
Thomas Earnhardt and Dana Jennings
Edith Eddleman
Dan and Janet Edgerton
Jim and Sally Edwards
Eric Eibelheuser
Electricities of North Carolina
Jean Ells
Keith Endres
Richard Etheridge
Lynn and Faye Eury
Kellie Falk-Tillett
Farmhouse Herbs
Ann Faust
D. Michael Ferrell
Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund
Steven and Leora Fields
Alan and Martha Finkel
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
Scott and Betsy Finley
John Finney
Susan Fisher
Roland Flory
Flower I
Timothy and Gina Flynn
Forestfarm Plant Nursery
Elizabeth and Thomas Forsythe
Antoinette Foster
Alyce Fowler
Terry and Cynthia Fowler
Frame and Art Shop
Lois Frazier
Thomas and Gwendolyn Frick
Wayne Friedrich
William and Cindy Fritz
Olan Fuquay
Galatea
Lena Gallitano
George and Jill Gammon, III
Rene and Judith Garces
The Garden Conservancy's Open Days Program
Garden Council of Winston-Salem/Forsyth County
The Garden Hut
Garden Study Club
Steven and Cindy Garris
C. Madison Geer
Rob and MaryLou Gelblum
Gilmore Plant and Bulb Co.
Dollie Glaum
Shannon Glazer
Ed Gleason
James and Kathleen Glenister
Christopher Glenn
Buddy and Deborah Gore
Russell Gorga and Colleen Boudreau
Alexander and Evgenya Gorodezky
Sheryl Gottilly
Stephen and Judith Gould
Frank and Judi Grainger
Anita Grant
Marguerite Gray-Hearn
Jeffrey and Sally Greaser
Cynthia and S. Bruce Green
Green Prints
Nancy Gregg
Melissa Griffin
Noel Griffin
Phillips and Shellie Gruber
Annette Guirlinger
Betsy Gunter
Stephen Gurganus
Janet Guthrie
Robert and Pickett Guthrie
M. Anthony Habit
Edna Hadley
Thomas and Susan Hadley
Bruce and Gina Hahn
Thomas and Dolores Haizlip
Robert and Nancy Hall
The Hamlin Cos.
Debbie Hamrick
Kenneth and Jane Hanck
James and Dorthy Hardin
Richard and Alice Hardy, III
A. E. and Susanne Harer
E. Gail Harrell
Nancy Hartley
James and Mary Anne Hartye
Robert Harvey
Danny and Carla Hassell
Gerald and Barbara Hawkins
Thomas and Linda Hayes
Martha Haynsworth
Warren Henderson
Richard and Judy Hendrickson
The Herb Society of Wake County
Lindsay Hester and Betty Lou Crute
Mary Hester
Doris Hicks
Barbara Hiestand
Patricia Highland
Thomas and Mary Hines
Timothy Hinton and Alisa Lycof-Hinton
Mollie and David Hodl
Margaret Hoffman
Hoffman Nursery
Carol Hogue
Elizabeth Holding
Beth Holleman
Anne Holliday
Marcia Hollis
Hedy Hollyfield
Harold and Patsy Hopfenberg
Horticultural Plantscapes
Virgil Householder
Alton and Ramona Howard
Brian and Marty Howard
William and Louise Howard
Harold and Katherine Howe
W. Brian Howell
Richard and Judy Hoyt
John and Blair Hughes
Scott and Stephani Humrickhouse
Robert Hunnings
Jane Hunter
Trish Hussey
Carl and Cindy Hutchins
Margaret Hynes
I Must Garden
Lucy Inman and William Warden
J. Frank Schmidt Family Trust
Jean Jackson
Jerry and Nina Jackson
Joe and Caroline Jackson
Earl and Barbara Jensen
Jere's Landscaping
John and Virginia Jernigan
Juan and Beth Jimenez
Cynthia Johnson
Jeffrey and Jennifer Johnson
Marjorie Johnson and Fred Westbrook
Stewart Johnson and Anne Middleton
Marilyn Jones
Robert Jones, Jr.
Shirley Jones
William and Blanche Jones
William and Mary Joslin
K. Pearce & Associates
Jonathon Kadis
Roy and Cindy Karas
Eugene Keener
Carol Kelly
Mary Kelly
David and Dorothea Kelsey
Tom Kendig
Kenneth and Sara Lynn Kennedy, Jr.
Loren and Barbara Kennedy
Vance and Michelle Kennedy
Keystone Chiropractic
Charles Kidder
Glenn Klaus
Edmund and Ruth Klemmer
Wes Kloos
Stephen and Nancy Knight
Knot Hill Flower Farm
Gale and Faye Koonce
Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar
Fred and Elyssa Kozak
David and Kathleen Kristan
Steve Kroeger
David and Christine Kushner
Raymond and Diane Kuzdrall
L. A. Reynolds Garden Showcase
Susan Lamb
Katrina Lamberto
Landscapes Designed
Laura Landsiedel
Richard and Amelia Lane
Eugene and Vicky Langley, Jr.
Late Bloomers Garden Club
Lynn Lau
Laurel Hills Garden Club
Virginia Lawler
Alexander and Carol Lawrence
Leaksville Garden Club
Isabelle Leduc
Janet Lehman
Carolyn Leith
John and Louise LeMay
Deb Leonard
Rebecca Levine
Jane Levinson
Harold and Noel Lichtin
Frank and Mildred Liggett, III
Cathy Lindsey and Richard Rambo
Walker and Rose Long
James and Lynn Longest
Debra Ludas
Curt and Diane Lunchick
The Lundy Fetterman Family Foundation
Alice Lutz
Patricia Lyke
Marian MacCormick
John and Jeannette MacDougal
MacGregor Downs Garden Club
Rudolf and Friederike Machilek
Alan MacIntyre
Francis Madigan
Connie and Richard Maes
Gus and Geary Mandrapilias
Pete Mangum
Howard and Elizabeth Manning, Jr.
Roy and Marguerite Marshall
Dick and Rebecca Martin
J. Speed and Barbara Massenburg
Matt Matthews
Daniel and Carolyn Maxton
Paul and Faye McArthur, Jr.
Betty McCain
Caroline McCall
Wayne and Rogeania McCay
Ida McCullers
Sharon McDaniel
James and Tish McDermott
Worth McDonald
Beverly McDougall
John and Judith McGowan
Raymond and Constance McHenry
Regina McIver
Alberta McKay
Sonya McKay
Thearon and Vanette McKinney
Polly and Rachel McLaughlin
Meg McLaurin and Ralph McDonald
Joseph and Jessica McLure
McNearys Wholesale Plants
Caprice McNeill
James and Ruth Mead
Larry and Audrey Mellichamp
Douglas and Mitzi Melton
L. Denny and Rita Mercer
Allen and Brenda Millar
Leonard Miller
Marlyn Miller
Robert and Lynda Miller
Ronald Mills
Carol Mims
L. S. Mitchell
Ronald and Melissa Mitchell
Wayne and Jean Mitchell
Sharon and Jay Molvie
Pettis and Roger Montague
James and Terree Montgomery
Janet Moore and Jennifer Mercer
Shaune and Janet Morley
Mary Morrow
Stan and Candice Morse
Mundise Mortimer
Austin and Claire Moss
Richard Moss and Marsha Owen
Harley and Marilyn Mudge
Sharon Mueller
Frank and Donna Muir
Richard Mullen
Cora Musial
Raleigh and Jennifer Myers
National Garden Club
The Nature of Art
Elizabeth Nelson
Diane and Dean Ness
Elizabeth Newhouse
John Newman
Mac and Lindsay Newsom, III
Charles and Ann Nicholson
W. and Margaret Nickola
Leonel Nino, Jr.
Cecile Noel
Ray Noggle
North American Rock Garden Society
North Carolina Commercial Flower Growers Association
North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association
North Carolina Unit of the Herb Society of America
Michael and Mary O'Connell
William and Patricia O'Quinn
Oakwood Garden Club
Joseph Ogburn
Elizabeth Olander
Pamela Olson
G. David and Johnette Orr
Elena Owens and James Stella
Steven and Judith Packer
Winston and Anne Page, Jr.
John Parker and Easter Maynard
Thomas and Louise Parker
James Parrott, Jr.
Katherine Paul
Sandra and R. J. Paur
Philip Pavlik
Barbara Pearce
Karen Pearce
Kenneth and Ana Pecota
Melissa Peden
Steven and Katie Perry
Janis Petit
Charles and Kimberly Petrie, Jr.
Robert and Christy Peyton
Jeffrey and Jennifer Phelan
Seth and Rose Philbrook
Jeffrey and Catherine Phillips
John Phillips
Pi Alpha Xi, NC State University
Piedmont Carolina Nursery
Piedmont Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society
Pine Knot Farms
Plant Delights Nursery
Noel Polhemus
Marian Pollard
Louis Polletta and Graham McKinney
Kirk Port
Anne Porter
John Posthill
Dana Pounds
John and Charlotte Presley
Harriet Procter
Andrea Purdy
Ward and Charlotte Purrington
Alfred and Suzanne Purrington
Buster and Linda Quin
Raleigh Garden Club
Anthony and Karen Rand
Meribeth Ratterree
Janet Rattray
George and Christine Reddin
Nash and Jessica Redwine
Philip and Rebecca Redwine, Jr.
Redwine's Plantscaping & Special Events
Sherrill and Carolyn Register
Alexandra Reid
Nancy Reid
Catherine Reilly
John Richardson
Robbin Richardson
Ronald and George Ricks
Paul and Laura Ridgeway
Dale and Susan Riley
Mike and Sharon Riley
Michael and Nora Robbins
Tula Robbins
Robert and Linda Rodriguez
Michelle Roberts
Patricia Rodgers
Steven and Deborah Roesel
C. Durward Rogers and Lou Ann Martin-Rogers
Robert and Louise Rogers
Mary Rollins
Michelle Rose
E. Darwin and Deborah Roseman
Kelly Rowells
Richard and Marilyn Rowland
Roxboro Garden Club
Judy Ryan
Sadlack's Heroes
David and Carole Saravitz
Barbara Sarvis
Nasira Sayed
Leroy and Marilyn Saylor
Diane Schaaf
John Schofield, III
Carolyn Scott
Donald and Patricia Scott
Robin Segall
Andrea Shapiro
Eugene and Frances Shapiro
Judith Shapiro
James and Susan Shearin
Shepherd's Center of Greensboro
Mike and Gayle Sheppard
James Sherwood, Jr.
David and Katherine Shoffner
Robert Shore
John and Virginia Shutt
Alan Silvers
Susan Skidmore
T. Brooks Skinner, Jr., and J. Lester Harmon
Michael and Ginny Sledge
Mary Smart
Roger Smith
Anne Smith
John and Judy Smith
Michael and Mary Dee Smith
Sherwood and Eva Smith
Edward and Carol Smithwick, Jr.
Joanna Smothers
Frances Snipes
Aleise Sockell
Margaret Somerall
Debra Souders
William Sowter
David and Patricia Spain
Robert and Patricia Spearman
Herbert and Andrea Sprott
Carla and Danny Squires
Mike Stallings and Mitzi Hole
State Employees Combined Campaign
Janine Steel and John Zane
Steel Magnolias Garden Club
Dia Steiger
Gerald and Carol Stein
Kristopher Stein
Edward and Anita Stejskal
Mollie Stephenson
Eric Stevens and Susan Baldwin
Sally Stevens
Lee and Renee Stiff
Ray and Rose Ann Stilwell
Gerald Storms
Marjorie Strawn
Lisa Stroud
Mary Stroup and Anthony Moretto, Jr.
Claudia Sturges
Coleen Sullins
Swagger
Deborah Swain
Ann Swallow
Cornelius and Charlotte Swart
Swift Creek Nursery
Banks and Louise Talley
Susan and Gerard Tarabokia
Frederick and Myra Taylor
Richard and Gail Taylor
Taylor's Nursery
Taylor's Nursery & Plant Farm
John and Lorely Temple
Jane Templeton
Tennessee Valley Nursery
Peggy Titus
Catherine Tolman
Jane and Roxie Towns
Triangle United Way
Ann Turlington
Twin City Garden Club
Gerald Tynan and Martha Stark
Mary Tyndall
Matt and Maciej Tyrlik
Valerie Tyson and Richard Ehrhardt
The Unique Plant
United Way
Todd and Michelle Van Gundy
Brooke Venable
George and Nickye Venters
Lisa Vera
Andrea Verykoukis
Janet Virnelson and Gerald Field
Volunteers of the North Carolina Museum of Art
Dawn and Philip Wagner
Wake Stone Corp.
Robert Walko and Kathy Voytko-Walko
Ellen Wall
Robert Walters
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks
Randall and Susan Ward
Washington Garden Club
Ronald and Mouzetta Weathers
Mark and Mary Weathington
Charles Weaver
Joseph and Vicky Webb
S. V. Webb
Virginia Weiler
Gregory and Laura Anne Welch
Mildred Welch
Mary Welles
Dennis and Georgina Werner
Tommy and Holly West
Erin Weston
Thomas and Laura Whatley
Elisabeth Wheeler
Ralph and Cheryl Whisnant
Robert Whisnant
Suzanne Whitmeyer
Arthur and Frances Whittington
Wilde Oaks Nursery
Bobby Wilder
David and Judiann Wilkinson
Mildred Wilkinson
Edward and Cornelia Willer
Erwin and Mary Williams
Oliver and Julia Williams
W. R. and Carol Williams
Willow Tree Landscaping
Bradley and Carole Wilson
James Wilson
Jan Wilson
Lindie Wilson
Elizabeth Wingfield
Lynne Wogan
George and Reba Worsley, Jr.
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne
Tamara Yamaykin
Joseph Yancey
Helen Yoest and David Philbrook
Smedes and Rosemary York
Grace Young
Dora Zia
Paul and Stefanie Zizzo
Terri Zwierzynski

Matching Gift Companies

Corporate matching gift programs are a great way to optimize individual gifts to the JCRA. We sincerely appreciate the generosity of the corporations that participate in this program and the donors who make the initial gift to benefit the Arboretum.

Bank of America
BASF
Becton Dickinson
GlaxoSmithKline
IBM
MetLife Foundation
Pfizer Foundation
Philip Morris USA
Progress Energy
Saint-Gobain Corp.
Seimens
State Farm
Temple-Inland
Verizon
Wachovia Foundation
Wyeth Vaccines

Honored and Remembered People

These special friends were recognized and remembered in 2008.

In Honor of Tim Alderton
Laurel Hills Garden Club

In Honor of Tony Avent
Ann Avent

In Honor of Kevin Brice
Mary Brice

In Honor of Phil Campbell
MacGregor Downs Garden Club

In Honor of Anne Clapp
Virginia Hester
Laurel Hills Garden Club

In Honor of J. P. and Denise Cole
Bradley Cole

In Honor of Nelsa Cox
Bloomsbury Garden Club

In Honor of Suzanne Edney
John and Jeannette MacDougal

In Honor of Elizabeth Galecki and Theodore Sampson
Terri Zwierzynski

In Honor of Phil and Linda Hutchins
Carl and Cindy Hutchins

In Honor of Charlie Kidder and Tim Alderton
Laurel Hills Garden Club

In Honor of Michael Lynskey
Kristin Vitko

In Honor of Bob Lyons
Tim Alderton
Bernadette Clark
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Ralph Dean and Nancy Doubrava
Christopher Glenn
Loren and Barbara Kennedy
Gale and Faye Koonce
Ida McCullers
Cora Musial
Anne Porter
Ann Swallow
Valerie Tyson and Richard Ehrhardt
Mark and Mary Weathington
Dennis and Georgina Werner

In Honor of Chris Moorman
Washington Garden Club

In Honor of David Payne
Late Bloomers Garden Club

In Honor of Carol Stein
MacGregor Downs Garden Club

In Honor of Dennis Werner
Howard and Mary Edith Alexander
Arbor Enterprises
Angelia Beasley
Allen and Anne Clapp
Jack and Micki Cox, Jr.
Johnie and Genelle Dail
Larry Daniel
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
Warren Henderson
Jerry and Nina Jackson
Charles Kidder
Stephen and Nancy Knight
Richard and Amelia Lane
The Lundy Fetterman Family Foundation
Rudolf and Friederike Machilek
James and Ruth Mead
Piedmont Carolina Nursery
Swift Creek Nursery
Elisabeth Wheeler
Ralph and Cheryl Whisnant
Robert Whisnant
Helen Yoest and David Philbrook

In Honor of Susan Wilson
John Phillips

In Honor of Wilda Whitley
Gaines Whitley

In Memory of Richard Boyner
Gary and Christi Cramer

In Memory of Harvey Bumgardner
Allen and Betty Adams
Frances Bradow
Elizabeth Buford and Donald Mathews
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
Grady Cooper, Jr.
Henri Dawkins
Patricia Deboer
Starke and Angela Dillard
Robert and Pickett Guthrie
Thomas and Dolores Haizlip
Doris Hicks
Elizabeth Holding
William and Mary Joslin
Virginia Lawler
Joseph and Jessica McLure
Mary Morrow
Oakwood Garden Club
David and Judiann Wilkinson

In Memory of George Hassell
Danny and Carla Hassell

In Memory of Claudia Speed
W. E. and Debbie Batson
James Crawford, Jr.
Robert and Anne Currin
Electricities of North Carolina
John and Louise LeMay
Betty McCain
Thomas and Louise Parker
Anthony and Karen Rand
William Sowter
Mildred Welch

2008 Gala in the Garden Sponsors

The Gala in the Garden is the Arboretum's signature fund-raising event held each year on the first Sunday in May. In 2008, our sponsors contributed over $63,000. Thank you, 2008 Gala in the Garden sponsors, for making this event a huge success.

Diamond Sponsor
North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association

Platinum Sponsors
A. E. Finley Foundation
North Carolina Farm Bureau/Southern Farm Bureau Life
Pender Nursery (Jim and Kathy Deal)

Gold Sponsors
Bayer Advanced
Hawksridge Farms
Hoffman Nursery

Silver Sponsors
Bland Landscaping Co.
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina
Dottie and W. L. Burns
Century Framing (Bobby G. Wilder)
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (Dean and Directors)
Fair Products (Judy and Frank Grainger)
Jerry and Nina Jackson
Lord Corp.
Robert E. Lyons
The North Carolina Agricultural Foundation
Outfall Farms
Mary Ann and Greg Poole
Quality Staffing Specialists
Sears Design Group (Dan C. L. Sears)
Taylor's Nursery
Worthington Farms

Bronze Sponsors
Anonymous
Phyllis and Donnie Brookshire
Linda and Tommy Bunn
Claude and Mary Caldwell
Lew and Annabelle Fetterman
Fox Hollow Nursery
Garland C. Norris Co.
Gilmore Plant and Bulb Co.
Goddin Landscaping
Golden Corral Corp.
Gregory Poole Equipment Co.
Ray and Annie Hibbs
Jeanette and Wallace Hyde
Julia Kornegay
LanArc
Omega Property Group (Carolyn Grant)
Pittsboro Place Partners
Anne M. Porter
Progress Energy
Sampson Nursery
Anthea and Russell Tate
Turftenders Landscape Services
Wakefield Nursery & Landscaping
Georgina and Dennis Werner
Frank and Janice Weedon
Wyatt-Quarles Seed Co.
Rosemary and Smedes York

Special Gifts
Anonymous
Bell Family Foundation
Custom Brick
Clara Flanagan
William and Mary Coker Joslin
Bill and Melda Lamm
Bet Pou McClamroch
Mary Virginia Welles

Special Thanks
Chris Cammarene-Wessel
EZ-GO (Charlie Neuman)
Adair Gibson and Jeff Glutz
Harris Wholesale
Pennington Seed Co.
Sylvia Redwine
Revels Tractor
Southern String Band
Walt Thompson

Gift-in-kind Donors

Support through in-kind gifts is vital to the success of our events, especially the Gala in the Garden.  They also provide services and plant materials that keep the Arboretum beautiful for everyone.

Plants Used
Tim Alderton
Arboretum Kalmthout
Michael and Pam Beck
Big Bloomers Flower Farm
Boyd Nursery Co.
Frances Bradow
Cam Too Camellia Nursery
Camellia Forest Nursery
Campbell Road Nursery
Dennis and Eileen Carey
Chiba University
John and Molly Chiles
Chollipo Arboretum
Commercial Nursery
Currins Nursery
Department of Plant Biology, NC State University
First Step Greenhouses
Forestfarm Plant Nursery
Wayne Friedrich
Gary's Nursery
Christopher Glenn
Hawksridge Farms
Hidden Hollow Nursery
High Country Gardens
Highland Creek Nursery
Timothy Hinton and Alisa Lycof-Hinton
Hoffman Nursery
Institute of Ecology and Botany of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Richard and Sarah Jaynes
Ozzie Johnson, Jr.
William and Mary Joslin
Thomas Krenitsky
Lakeland Nursery
Lazy S's Farm Nursery
Live Oak Gardens
Mendocino College
Missouri Botanical Garden
Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, NC State University
Norfolk Botanical Gardens Society
North American Rock Garden Society
North Carolina Division, Greenleaf Nursery Co.
Nurseries Caroliniana
Panther Creek Nursery
Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden
Jesse and Rebecca Perry
Plant Delights Nursery
Plant Development Services
Shadow Nursery
Silva Tarouca Research Institute for Landscape and Ornamental Gardening
Layne and Martha Kaye Snelling
Song Sparrow Perennial Farm
Specialty Ornamentals
Spring Meadow Nursery
Stanley & Sons Nursery
Terra Nova Nurseries
Tinga Nursery
Transplant Nursery
U.S. National Arboretum
The Unique Plant
Mark and Mary Weathington
Dennis and Georgina Werner
Weston Farms
Dick White
Williford's Nursery
Robert Wilson
Helen Yoest and David Philbrook
Sandie Zazzara
Zelenka Nursery

Plants Sold or Auctioned
Architectural Trees
Boyd Nursery Co.
Cam Too Camellia Nursery
Campbell Road Nursery
Finch Blueberry Nursery
Gary's Nursery
Christopher Glenn
Hawksridge Farms
Hefner's Nursery
Hidden Hollow Nursery
Highland Creek Nursery
Hoffman Nursery
Johnson Nursery Corp.
McDonald's Nursery
Monrovia Nursery of North Carolina
Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, NC State University
North Carolina Division, Greenleaf Nursery Co.
Nurseries Caroliniana
Panther Creek Nursery
Pender Nursery
Piedmont Carolina Nursery
Plant Delights Nursery
Shiloh Nursery
Song Sparrow Perennial Farm
Spring Meadow Nursery
Stanley & Sons Nursery
Sugarbush Gardens
Tarheel Native Trees
Taylor's Nursery
Tinga Nursery
Valerie Tyson and Richard Ehrhardt
The Unique Plant
Williford's Nursery
Zelenka Nursery

Items Used
Appalachian Trees
Ann Armstrong
BASF Corp.
Bayer Advanced
Bayer Environmental Science
Jayme Bednarczyk and Philip Abbott
Belgard Hardscapes
Campbell Road Nursery
Capitol City Lumber Co.
Carolina Gardener
Carolina Stalite
Century Framing
Dale Cousins
Custis Nursery
Custom Landscapes
Vincent and Sandra Dabrowski
Cynthia Dowdy
Fred Adams Paving Co.
Wayne Friedrich
William and Cindy Fritz
Alexander and Evgenya Gorodezky
Greenleaf Nursery Co.
Benjie Hester
Horticultural Plantscapes
Jerry and Nina Jackson
Juan and Beth Jimenez
Lancaster Farms
Richard and Amelia Lane
Deb Leonard
Makhteshim Agan of North America
The Nature of Art
New Ornamentals Society
Novozymes North America
Ornamentea
Pennington Seed Co.
Quali-Pro
Redwine's Plantscaping & Special Events
Robert Rossier and Eldred Hudson
Rudino
Mike Stallings and Mitzi Hole
Dennis and Georgina Werner
Helen Yoest and David Philbrook

Items Sold or Auctioned
Jill Adams
Rosanna Adams
Tim Alderton
Dwen Andrews-Cita and Felix Cita Gomez
Dick Balcon
Michael and Pam Beck
Ben Owen Pottery
Rick and Betty Boggs
Bonsai West
Bosetti Art Tile
Virginia Brogden
Jim Buckingham
John Buettner and John Dole
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
Mark Burnham
C. T. Weekends
Carolina Panthers
Century Framing
Pamela Chance
Chef Mario's
Conomara Designs
The Creative Image
Victoria Cumbee
Mark Currin
Custom Landscapes
Johnie and Genelle Dail
Barbara Dechter
Karen Dillard
Dirt Works Pottery
Elizabeth Galecke Photography
Finch Blueberry Nursery
Wayne Friedrich
Christopher Glenn
Brie Gluvna
Judi Grainger
H.A.N.D.S.
Henry's Gelato
Ray and Annie Hibbs
jaGG Classic Wholesale
John Janeri
JC Atwell Designs
Jewelry by Artie
Juan and Beth Jimenez
Johnson Nursery Corp.
Charles Kidder
John and Gloria Kimber
Gary and Joyce King
Patricia Korpik
Anita Kuehne and Bill Swint
Angela Lands
Bryce and Sue Lane
Richard and Kathleen Lessard
Mary Little
Logan Trading Co.
Robert Lyons
Ronald and Verna Medeiros
L. Denny and Rita Mercer
Paul Minnis
Morrisville Cat Hospital
Nature's Art by Susan Aldworth
Neomonde Deli
Al and Charlene Newsom
Charles and Beverly Norwood
Marjorie O'Keeffe
Keith and Dayle Oakley
Oakview Garden Club
The "Original" Owens Pottery
Page 49 Book Club
T. J. Parker
Pennington Seed Co.
Anne Porter
John and Charlotte Presley
Pure Expressions Photography
The Raleigh Garden Club
Redwine's Plantscaping & Special Events
Sandy Reid
Rocky Top Hospitality
ROI Salon
SBS Teas
Gayle Streifford
Susan Hatchell Landscape Architecture
Swagger
Tara's Photo Tiles
Thomas-Lynch Company
Gordon Thorpe
Valerie Tyson and Richard Ehrhardt
Paulette Van de Zande
Steve and Donna Walker
Watered Garden Florist
Whole Foods Market
Jan Wilson
Erica Winston
Words & Wires
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne
Helen Yoest and David Philbrook
Z Enterprises

JCRA Receives Grant from the North American Rock Garden Society

By Nancy Doubrava, Interpretive Specialist

The JC Raulston Arboretum was proud to receive a grant in 2008 from the North American Rock Garden Society's Norman Singer Endowment Fund to support the development of the rooftop gardens and the Scree Garden. Their generous funding enabled us to purchase new plants, plant identification labels, and interpretive materials for these gardens.

Be sure to come to the Arboretum and visit these popular new gardens. Here, you can see a wide diversity of drought tolerant plants from the southwestern United States, Mexico, South Africa, and similar habitats being tested for their performance in our area. These gardens continue to be a success thanks to the combined efforts of volunteer garden leader Charlie Kidder and volunteer Anita Kuehne, who generously donate their time each week to care for these gardens.

Endowments

An endowment is a lasting legacy. A special thanks to these donors for their foresight and generosity. Contributing to an endowment is a long-term investment that provides financial stability for the Arboretum year after year. For more information on how you can create an endowment to benefit the JC Raulston Arboretum, please contact Anne Porter at (919) 513-3826.

Charles T. and Ethel T. Larus Endowment for the JC Raulston Arboretum
Estate of Charles Larus

Dale and Thom Henderson Internship Endowment
Estate of Dale Henderson

JCRA Endowment for Excellence
Michael and Lee Abbott
Jill Adams
Roger and Donna Adams
Rosanna Adams
Anne Albright
Tim Alderton
Ross Allard
Karen-Marie Allen
Ann Marie Amico
Sachin Anchan and Shruti Simha
Linda Anderson
W. Clark and Lorraine Anderson
Robert and Evelyn Andrews
Clay Andrews
William and Ellen Archer, III
Joseph and Sarah Archie
William Arnold
Richard and Linda Atwell
Robert and Jane Avinger
Mary and William Babcock
James Baggett
Bruce and Gretchen Bailey
Wanda Bailey
Susan Balfour
Bruce and Tonya Banbury
Keith and Annette Bandy
Suzanne Barham
Patrick Barkley
Bill and Carol Barmann
William and Elizabeth Barnett, Jr.
Rolin Barrett
Bruce and Mary Barron
Elsie and Rodger Barrow
Lori Bartley
Arthur and Clare Bass
Angelia Beasley
Michael and Pam Beck
Jayme Bednarczyk and Philip Abbott
Bell Family Foundation
Robert and Meredith Bell, III
Harriet Bellerjeau
Donald Betts
Ann Betzold
Jim and Audrey Black
William and Holly Blanton
James and Linda Blount
Thomas and Elizabeth Bodenstine
Rick and Betty Boggs
Charles and Mary Bolton
Richard and Pamela Bostic
Jeffrey Bottoms and John Martin
Ann Boyd
Anne Bradshaw
Ashlyn Bradshaw
Joseph Brady, Jr.
Judith Bratton
Theresa Brett
Phillip and Susan Bridges
James and Linda Bright
Olin and Laura Brimberry
Daniel Brinkley
Leigh Brinkley
Brookhaven Night Garden Club
David and Sandra Brown
Malcolm and Patty Brown
Charles and Lois Brummitt
Robert and Geraldine Bryan
Cynthia Bulka
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
Tommy Bunn
Philip Burton
James Bustrack
Andy and Sarah Butler
John Byrne
Jeff and Ann Calamos
Rose Caldwell
William Brian Caldwell
Scott and Barbara Cardais
Carolina Trace Garden Club
Sheri Castle
Adam Cave
Joan Caviness and Scot Huber
Pamela Chance
Ray and Jean Cheely
Robert and Carolyn Chipman
Christa Faut Gallery
Thomas and Virgilia Church, Jr.
Tim and Carroll Clancy
Susan Clark
Clearscapes
Beth Cleveland
Bruce Clodfelter
Connie and Laurie Cochran
Michael and Suzanne Comstock
Mark and Susan Cook
Charles and Helga Copello
Winifred Coppedge
Amy Cotter
William and Kelli Cotter
Anthony and Susan Cottle
Robert Courts
Dale Cousins
Barbara Cox
Jack and Micki Cox, Jr.
Gregory and Martha Crampton
David Crawford, III, and Lee Moore-Crawford
James Crites
Tammie Crosier
Harriett Crow
Pamela Crown
Tonia Crumpton
Jan Cumberworth
Derek and Patricia Currin
Robert and Barbara D'Antonio
Steven and Jane Dabrowski
Vincent and Sandra Dabrowski
Johnie and Genelle Dail
Larry Daniel
Steve Darnell
Darryl's Hair Design
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Edward Davis, Jr.
Gloria Davis
Louis and Jane Davis
Foster and Maureen De La Houssaye
Jane Deacle
James and Kathryn Deal, Jr.
Ralph Dean and Nancy Doubrava
Robin Dedrick
Stuart and Deede Deibel
Lance and Lenore Deutch
Charles Dickerson, Jr.
Laura Dillard
James and Judythe Dingfelder
Sean Doig
John Dole
Alexander and Georgia Donaldson
Jeffrey Drum
David Dubow and Georganne Narron
Bill and Ann Duke
Karen Duke
Mike and Melody Duncan
Nancy Duncan
Elizabeth Dupree
Ginger Dusenbury
Haskell Eargle
Thomas Earnhardt and Dana Jennings
Edith Eddleman
Dan and Janet Edgerton
Jim and Sally Edwards
Eric Eibelheuser
Jean Ells
Keith Endres
Richard Etheridge
Lynn and Faye Eury
Kellie Falk-Tillett
Ann Faust
D. Michael Ferrell
Steven and Leora Fields
Alan and Martha Finkel
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
Scott and Betsy Finley
John Finney
Susan Fisher
Roland Flory
Flower I
Timothy and Gina Flynn
Forestfarm Plant Nursery
Elizabeth and Thomas Forsythe
Antoinette Foster
Alyce Fowler
Frame and Art Shop
Lois Frazier
Thomas and Gwendolyn Frick
William and Cindy Fritz
Olan Fuquay
Galatea
Lena Gallitano
George and Jill Gammon, III
Rene and Judith Garces
The Garden Hut
Penelope Gardner
Steven and Cindy Garris
C. Madison Geer
Shannon Glazer
Ed Gleason
James and Kathleen Glenister
Buddy and Deborah Gore
Russell Gorga and Colleen Boudreau
Alexander and Evgenya Gorodezky
Sheryl Gottilly
Stephen and Judith Gould
Frank and Judi Grainger
Anita Grant
Marguerite Gray-Hearn
Cynthia and S. Bruce Green
Green Prints
Nancy Gregg
Melissa Griffin
Noel Griffin
Phillips and Shellie Gruber
Annette Guirlinger
Betsy Gunter
Stephen Gurganus
Janet Guthrie
M. Anthony Habit
Edna Hadley
Thomas and Susan Hadley
Bruce and Gina Hahn
Robert and Nancy Hall
The Hamlin Cos.
Debbie Hamrick
Kenneth and Jane Hanck
Richard and Alice Hardy, III
A. E. and Susanne Harer
E. Gail Harrell
Nancy Hartley
James and Mary Anne Hartye
Robert Harvey
Gerald and Barbara Hawkins
Thomas and Linda Hayes
Martha Haynsworth
Warren Henderson
Richard and Judy Hendrickson
Henry Leon Lobsenz Foundation
Lindsay Hester and Betty Lou Crute
Mary Hester
Barbara Hiestand
Patricia Highland
Thomas and Mary Hines
Timothy Hinton and Alisa Lycof-Hinton
Mollie and David Hodl
Margaret Hoffman
Beth Holleman
Anne Holliday
Harold and Patsy Hopfenberg
Horticultural Plantscapes
Virgil Householder
Alton and Ramona Howard
Brian and Marty Howard
William and Louise Howard
Harold and Katherine Howe
Richard and Judy Hoyt
John and Blair Hughes
Scott and Stephani Humrickhouse
Robert Hunnings
Jane Hunter
Margaret Hynes
I Must Garden
Lucy Inman and William Warden
J. Frank Schmidt Family Trust
Jean Jackson
Joe and Caroline Jackson
Earl and Barbara Jensen
Jere's Landscaping
John and Virginia Jernigan
Juan and Beth Jimenez
Cynthia Johnson
Jeffrey and Jennifer Johnson
Marjorie Johnson and Fred Westbrook
Stewart Johnson and Anne Middleton
Marilyn Jones
Robert Jones, Jr.
Shirley Jones
K. Pearce & Associates
Jonathon Kadis
Roy and Cindy Karas
Eugene Keener
Carol Kelly
Mary Kelly
David and Dorothea Kelsey
Tom Kendig
Kenneth and Sara Lynn Kennedy, Jr.
Loren and Barbara Kennedy
Vance and Michelle Kennedy
Keystone Chiropractic
Charles Kidder
Glenn Klaus
Wes Kloos
Stephen and Nancy Knight
Knot Hill Flower Farm
Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar
Fred and Elyssa Kozak
David and Kathleen Kristan
Steve Kroeger
David and Christine Kushner
Raymond and Diane Kuzdrall
Susan Lamb
Katrina Lamberto
Landscapes Designed
Laura Landsiedel
Richard and Amelia Lane
Eugene and Vicky Langley, Jr.
Lynn Lau
Alexander and Carol Lawrence
Isabelle Leduc
Janet Lehman
Deb Leonard
Rebecca Levine
Jane Levinson
Harold and Noel Lichtin
Frank and Mildred Liggett, III
Cathy Lindsey and Richard Rambo
Walker and Rose Long
James and Lynn Longest
Debra Ludas
Curt and Diane Lunchick
The Lundy Fetterman Family Foundation
Alice Lutz
Patricia Lyke
Marian MacCormick
MacGregor Downs Garden Club
Alan MacIntyre
Connie and Richard Maes
Gus and Geary Mandrapilias
Pete Mangum
Howard and Elizabeth Manning, Jr.
Roy and Marguerite Marshall
Dick and Rebecca Martin
J. Speed and Barbara Massenburg
Matt Matthews
Paul and Faye McArthur, Jr.
Caroline McCall
Wayne and Rogeania McCay
Sharon McDaniel
James and Tish McDermott
Worth McDonald
Beverly McDougall
John and Judith McGowan
Raymond and Constance McHenry
Regina McIver
Alberta McKay
Sonya McKay
Thearon and Vanette McKinney
Polly and Rachel McLaughlin
Meg McLaurin and Ralph McDonald
McNearys Wholesale Plants
Caprice McNeill
James and Ruth Mead
Larry and Audrey Mellichamp
Douglas and Mitzi Melton
L. Denny and Rita Mercer
Allen and Brenda Millar
Marlyn Miller
Robert and Lynda Miller
Ronald Mills
Carol Mims
L.S. Mitchell
Wayne and Jean Mitchell
Pettis and Roger Montague
James and Terree Montgomery
Janet Moore and Jennifer Mercer
Shaune and Janet Morley
Stan and Candice Morse
Mundise Mortimer
B. Austin and Claire Moss
Richard Moss and Marsha Owen
Harley and Marilyn Mudge
Sharon Mueller
Frank and Donna Muir
Richard Mullen
Raleigh and Jennifer Myers
The Nature of Art
Elizabeth Nelson
Diane and Dean Ness
Elizabeth Newhouse
John Newman
Mac and Lindsay Newsom, III
Charles and Ann Nicholson
W. and Margaret Nickola
Cecile Noel
Ray Noggle
Michael and Mary O'Connell
William and Patricia O'Quinn
Joseph Ogburn
Elizabeth Olander
Matthew and Diane Olson
Pamela Olson
G. David and Johnette Orr
Elena Owens and James Stella
Steven and Judith Packer
Winston and Anne Page, Jr.
John Parker and Easter Maynard
James Parrott, Jr.
Katherine Paul
Sandra and R. J. Paur
Philip Pavlik
Barbara Pearce
Karen Pearce
Melissa Peden
Janis Petit
Charles and Kimberly Petrie, Jr.
Robert and Christy Peyton
Jeffrey and Jennifer Phelan
Seth and Rose Philbrook
Jeffrey and Catherine Phillips
John Phillips
Plant Delights Nursery
Noel Polhemus
Marian Pollard
Louis Polletta and Graham McKinney
Kirk Port
John Posthill
Dana Pounds
John and Charlotte Presley
Harriet Procter
Andrea Purdy
Ward and Charlotte Purrington
Alfred and Suzanne Purrington
Buster and Linda Quin
Meribeth Ratterree
Janet Rattray
George and Christine Reddin
Nash and Jessica Redwine
Philip and Rebecca Redwine, Jr.
Redwine's Plantscaping & Special Events
Sherrill and Carolyn Register
Alexandra Reid
Nancy Reid
Catherine Reilly
John Richardson
Robbin Richardson
Ronald and George Ricks
Paul and Laura Ridgeway
Dale and Susan Riley
Mike and Sharon Riley
Michael and Nora Robbins
Tula Robbins
Robert and Linda Rodriguez
Michelle Roberts
Patricia Rodgers
Steven and Deborah Roesel
C. Durward Rogers and Lou Ann Martin-Rogers
Mary Rollins
Michelle Rose
E. Darwin and Deborah Roseman
Richard and Marilyn Rowland
Judy Ryan
Sadlack's Heroes
David and Carole Saravitz
Barbara Sarvis
Nasira Sayed
Leroy and Marilyn Saylor
Diane Schaaf
John Schofield, III
Carolyn Scott
Donald and Patricia Scott
Robin Segall
Andrea Shapiro
Eugene and Frances Shapiro
James and Susan Shearin
Mike and Gayle Sheppard
James Sherwood, Jr.
David and Katherine Shoffner
Robert Shore
John and Virginia Shutt
Alan Silvers
Susan Skidmore
T. Brooks Skinner, Jr., and J. Lester Harmon
Michael and Ginny Sledge
Mary Smart
Roger Smith
Anne Smith
John and Judy Smith
Michael and Mary Dee Smith
Sherwood and Eva Smith
Edward and Carol Smithwick, Jr.
Joanna Smothers
Frances Snipes
Aleise Sockell
Margaret Somerall
Debra Souders
David and Patricia Spain
Robert and Patricia Spearman
Herbert and Andrea Sprott
Carla and Danny Squires
Janine Steel and John Zane
Steel Magnolias Garden Club
Dia Steiger
Gerald and Carol Stein
Kristopher Stein
Mollie Stephenson
Eric Stevens and Susan Baldwin
Sally Stevens
Lee and Renee Stiff
Gerald Storms
Marjorie Strawn
Lisa Stroud
Mary Stroup and Anthony Moretto, Jr.
Claudia Sturges
Coleen Sullins
Swagger
Deborah Swain
Banks and Louise Talley
Susan and Gerard Tarabokia
Richard and Gail Taylor
Taylor's Nursery
Jane Templeton
Peggy Titus
Catherine Tolman
Jane and Roxie Towns
Ann Turlington
Mary Tyndall
Matt and Maciej Tyrlik
Todd and Michelle Van Gundy
Brooke Venable
George and Nickye Venters
Lisa Vera
Andrea Verykoukis
Janet Virnelson and Gerald Field
Dawn and Philip Wagner
Robert Walters
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks
Randall and Susan Ward
Ronald and Mouzetta Weathers
Charles Weaver
Joseph and Vicky Webb
S. V. Webb
Virginia Weiler
Gregory and Laura Anne Welch
Mary Welles
Tommy and Holly West
Erin Weston
Elisabeth Wheeler
Ralph and Cheryl Whisnant
Suzanne Whitmeyer
Arthur and Frances Whittington
Wilde Oaks Nursery
Bobby Wilder
Mildred Wilkinson
Edward and Cornelia Willer
Erwin and Mary Williams
Oliver and Julia Williams
W. R. and Carol Williams
Willow Tree Landscaping
Bradley and Carole Wilson
James Wilson
Jan Wilson
Lindie Wilson
Elizabeth Wingfield
Lynne Wogan
George and Reba Worsley, Jr.
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne
Tamara Yamaykin
Joseph Yancey
Helen Yoest and David Philbrook
Smedes and Rosemary York
Grace Young
Paul and Stefanie Zizzo
Terri Zwierzynski

Robert E. Lyons Internship Endowment
Tim Alderton
Bernadette Clark
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Ralph Dean and Nancy Doubrava
Christopher Glenn
Loren and Barbara Kennedy
Gale and Faye Koonce
Ida McCullers
Cora Musial
Anne Porter
Ann Swallow
Valerie Tyson and Richard Ehrhardt
Mark and Mary Weathington
Dennis and Georgina Werner

Rose Garden Endowment
A. E. Finley Foundation

Leaving a Legacy

The Top 10 Reasons to talk with us about including a gift for the JC Raulston Arboretum in your will:

10. A bequest is an easy, effective way to support the Arboretum.
9. You may designate your gift to any JCRA program or garden area.
8. You may create an endowment fund that will last in perpetuity.
7. You may create a scholarship fund to help future horticultural or landscape design students.
6. Regulations dealing with the estate tax are changing, almost each year.
5. We can help identify which assets are best to use in making your gift.
4. You will become a member of the NC State University Pullen Society.
3. We can provide information on the best way to structure your gift.
2. We can help plan so your gift will be used exactly as you wish.
And …
1. It gives us a chance to thank you for your future gift.

Please contact Anne Porter at (919) 513-3826 or anne_porter@ncsu.edu for more details.

Volunteers

The gift of service is invaluable to the Arboretum, and we are very appreciative of the many hours our volunteers devote to the Arboretum. Our volunteers share their many talents and their time to make the Arboretum a wonderful place for all to enjoy. We couldn't do it without them. Thanks to all of them.

Volunteer Hours—January–December 2008

Our volunteers gave over 8,000 hours of their time in 2008. Their efforts have made the Arboretum a showpiece in the community.

200+ Hours
Mary Edith Alexander
Vivian Finkelstein

100-199 Hours
Rosanna Adams
Claude and Mary Caldwell
Colin Daniels
Linda Glenn
Annie Hibbs
Beth Jimenez
Margaret Jordan
Charles Kidder
Patricia Korpik
Amelia Lane
Jean Mitchell
Laddie and Edna Munger
Elaine Pace
John Pelosi
Charlotte Presley
John Schott
Ralph Whisnant
David White
Helen Yoest
Dora Zia

40-99 Hours
Angelia Beasley
Jayme Bednarczyk
Harriet Bellerjeau
Regan Brown
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
Anne Clapp
Laurie Cochran
Patrice Cooke
Sherman Criner
Genelle Dail
Dennis Drehmel
C. J. Dykes
Suzanne Edney
Jeffrey Evans
Mike Ferrell
Wayne Friedrich
Marilyn Golightly
Cindy Heinlein
Barbara Kennedy
Anita Kuehne and Bill Swint
Rudolf and Friederike Machilek
Sarah Marano
Frank Moore
Richard Pearson
Cindy Rayno
Alexandra Reid
Shannon Renard
Judy Ryan
James Schlitt
Nancy Simonsen
Ann Swallow
Betsy Viall
Kathy Violette
Dee Welker

Other Contributions of Hours
Dale Allen
Jeanne Andrus
Barbara Blackwell
Lisa Bohlen-Admire
Frances Bradow
Lynn Canada
Betty Cannady
Monika Coleman
Nancy Council-Rix
Kathy Crosby
Patricia Cross
Heather Daulton
Barbara Dechter
Cynthia Dowdy
Wendy Elliott
Mary Lou Eycke
Carolyn Fagan
Roland Flory
Chloe Francis
Tracey Francis
Benjamin Gill
Rebecca Green
Judy Harmon
Gail Harris
Paul Henehan
Timothy Hinton and Alisa Lycof-Hinton
Mitzi Hole
Donna Horton
Marty Howard
Cheryl Kearns
Sheila Kellogg
Gloria Kimber
Jennette King
Diane Kuzdrall
Joan Little
Robert Mackintosh
Rogeania McCay
Rick McGirt
Alberta McKay
Thearon and Vanette McKinney
Verna Medeiros
Guy Meilleur
Philip Meilleur
Rita Mercer
Twila Mitchell
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Harley Mudge
Julie Nazar
Lara Rose Philbrook
Catherine Poff
Martha Ramirez
Kathe Rauch
Erin Schnieders
Stanley Shieh
Stephanie Simmons
Susan Skidmore
Kristina Solberg
Ann Stellings
John Suddath
Martha Thomason
Walt and Kathleen Thompson
Christine Thomson
Anitra Todd
Ruth Updegraff
Joanne Vandermast
Donna Watkins
Bee Weddington
Elisabeth Wheeler
Bill and Libby Wilder
Bobby Wilder
Qian Wu
Jewel Wynns
Sandie Zazzara

Volunteer News

By Barbara Kennedy, Volunteer Coordinator

With all the rain we have had this season, the need for lots of work in the gardens is guaranteed. Before we know it, buds will be opening and plants will be poking through the soil. This is a great time to volunteer to be part of our many activities. New and returning volunteers are always welcome.

New Volunteers

Terri Benton – Gardener
Heather Daulton – Butterfly Garden
Marilyn Golightly – Mapping
Julie Nazar – Mapping
Ginny Parker – Winter Garden
Chaula Shah – Weekend Gardener
Stanley Shieh – Weekend Gardener
Stephanie Simmon – Butterfly Garden
Susan Skidmore – Winter Garden
Nancy Sosnik – Special Projects
Christine Thomson – Visitor Center

Our Volunteer Tour Guides take a trip through the gardens as part of their refresher session. Keeping up with new plants and changes in the gardens helps our guides when they give tours to visitors.

Jim Schlitt, one of our volunteer gardeners, tackles the ornamental grass in the Perennial Border. As you can see, the grass almost overpowers Jim, but he manages to get the grass pruned in short order.

Preparing Connoisseur Plants for distribution requires concentration and paying attention to detail. Elisabeth Wheeler and Regan Brown work as a team to make sure everyone gets the correct plants.

The Annual Volunteer Pot Luck is a great time to get together with volunteers and just have a fun time. Roland Flory, Elaine Pace, and Denny Werner pose for this picture at Denny's home.

Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks have just finished a great meal and now take time to relax and enjoy the surroundings.

The Annual Plant Distribution requires lots of help from our volunteers. Here, Dee Welker helps label plants that will be part of the giveaway.

The Holiday Open House brings volunteers, staff and guests together to celebrate the season and enjoy tables full of delicious food prepared by all. Volunteers are enjoying the food and the friendship of other volunteers.


Formatted into HTML by Christopher Todd Glenn
Programs and Education Coordinator
JC Raulston Arboretum
Department of Horticultural Science
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC 27695-7522

© The JC Raulston Arboretum, March 2009

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