Note: The JCRA launched a new Web site on March 1. Please visit us at http://jcra.ncsu.edu. This site, http://www.ncsu.edu/jcraulstonarboretum/, is no longer being updated.

Friends of the JC Raulston Arboretum Newsletter
Spring 2011 – Vol. 15, No. 1

Lath House construction Lath House construction
Lath House construction Lath House construction

Words from the Director

Ten to Eleven

By Ted Bilderback, Director

It’s that “time” thing again! Time just keeps slipping by so quickly. The year 2010 brought some major long-dreamed-of garden construction projects to reality. The Japanese Garden renovation was completed just in time for the grand opening at our Gala in the Garden on May 2. The new Frank Harmon-designed Lath House construction was completed in time for fall 2010. The Master Plan committee has worked diligently to complete the pathways and bed design for the new Lath House. Bed construction and planting the Lath House is a major focus for early 2011, with the official dedication slated for fall, when we will recognize all the people who helped make this project a reality—especially Mike Stallings and Mitzi Hole.

The year 2011 may be a little calmer in regard to new garden projects—but only time will tell! A little breathing time between major projects will allow Mark, Tim, and our band of dedicated volunteers a chance to work on the punch list of minor construction projects. “Valley” is code for “needs work” in the Asian Valley. There are some changes in elevation and, hence, rapid movement of water during storms. The description translates into work required for eliminating giant mulch slides and/or new USGS maps showing blue line designations for intermittent streams in our garden. We also have some areas of erosion in the Scree Garden that require some attention, so you can see there will be plenty of garden projects to accomplish in 2011.

As time marches on, you will witness the creation of the Ellipse, circled by a pathway similar to the main path from the Japanese Garden to the Necessary. The Ellipse is destined to be the Arboretum’s major events area. We are currently seeking private funding for this project in order to launch construction of this new area. And speaking of the Necessary, our volunteer construction crew just completed a face lift with all new exterior paint, plus a new roof. The Model Gardens are another future project area that the Master Plan committee continues to review. We have struggled with what the changes in the Model Garden area should be. The Master Plan committee, always looking for new ideas and younger thinking, invited horticulture landscape design students in one of Julie Sherk’s Department of Horticultural Science landscape design classes to develop and present their visions of the function, flow, space use, and plant collections for this region of the Arboretum. There were lots of good ideas and still much creative thinking is in progress. We are very much open to ideas that Friends of the Arboretum might have, and we are always appreciative of financial assistance for the Model Gardens development, as well other garden projects.

The Master Plan really is our road map for the future development of the Arboretum, but the time is now to appreciate and enjoy the approximately 5,500 taxa of plants and beautiful floriferous views. The JC Raulston Arboretum is your public garden and in reality, it is Raleigh’s garden! With over 1,400 FOA members, the JCRA has a strong base of support.

However, Wake County’s population is approaching one million people and many do not even know that the Arboretum exists. It’s time to solve our identity problem, so with the help of the JCRA Board of Advisors and the dedicated staff, we have set a strategic plan in place to help create and support excellent gardens and collections; provide financial security; offer outstanding quality and variety of educational programming; and provide effective communications and public relations. We still have considerable work ahead, but many of the designated priorities are already well under way.

One major priority is becoming a reality. The JC Raulston Arboretum is truly a great resource for families and children. Obviously, the Margaret Snow Manooch Cascade is a kid magnet, but beyond the aesthetics and water features, there is so much more that begs to be learned about our plants, the garden, and their environmental impact. Coupling the idea of a JCRA Children’s Program with the fact that Wake County has one of the largest populations of home-schooled children in the United States, it was a natural fit for the JCRA to develop and offer a children’s science curriculum module. Call it good karma or a “meant to be moment,” but I received an e-mail from Jennie Cowan saying she was a citizen of the United Kingdom and did not have a U.S. work permit, but she was experienced in developing children’s programs and wanted to come work with us while she was in Raleigh during September through December 2010. Jennie was a true blessing. We were also fortunate to recruit Liz Driscoll, NC 4-H youth Extension specialist. After Jennie returned to England, we hired Caroline Richardson as our new children’s program coordinator. Jennie, Caroline, and Liz diligently planned a variety of children’s programs, plus conducted several train-the-trainers programs with volunteers. Their effervescence and excitement for introducing youth programs to our volunteers and friends shows. The time is now for a JCRA Children’s Program, and we are on our way by introducing some new things that we can offer Raleigh and Wake County families and children.

We hope that our new educational programs, coupled with our new communications and public relations priorities, and as always, the outstanding garden and plant displays, will bring many new Friends of the Arboretum who will become lifelong members. Please don’t keep Raleigh’s “best kept secret” to yourself—tell a friend, or better yet, bring a friend to Raleigh’s Garden today!

Horticulture

Maples for All Seasons—Evergreen Acer at the JCRA

By Mark Weathington, Assistant Director and Curator of Collections

The JC Raulston Arboretum evaluates a wide diversity of woody plants for suitability to the central Piedmont region of North Carolina and the broader southeastern United States. Maples (Acer) have been an important component of the collections of the JCRA since its inception in the 1970s and currently there are about 265 maples in the collection. In recent years, evergreen and semi-evergreen species have gradually been accumulated through wild collections and from cultivated material. Many of these Acer are poorly understood and rarely grown even in botanic gardens, but may be suitable for wider use throughout the Southeast.

The genus Acer, formerly included in its own family, the Aceraceae, is now widely placed in the Sapindaceae family. The genus was first described in 1700 by French botanist Joseph Tournefort and the name derives from the Proto-Indo-European word meaning “sharp.” Carl Linnaeus officially assigned the genus in 1753 in his landmark Species Plantarum. Acer is a widespread genus with members ranging from North America to Europe and North Africa and across to Asia and Indonesia where they cross to the southern hemisphere. There are approximately 125–150 species of Acer; relatively few are evergreen or mostly evergreen. The majority of these evergreen forms are native to Southeast Asia and the Himalayan region with a couple of outliers in the eastern Mediterranean region.

Acer albopurpurascens is an evergreen tree to 50’, endemic to the island of Taiwan. It is closely related to the similar A. oblongum and some taxonomists place both of these species in A. laevigatum. Botanists distinguish A. albopurpurescens primarily by the indistinct basal nerves on the leaves. The foliage is leathery and glossy pale green above while the underside is glaucous white to purplish. Like many of the evergreen Asian maples, the foliage of this tree is entire and unlobed. Mature trees develop an upright oval habit and are quite beautiful. Fall can bring plum tones to the underside of the leaves, adding interest to the winter landscape. It ranges from low to medium altitudes throughout Taiwan. We have not been able to test this plant in the landscape yet, although one plant grown from seed obtained through the Taiwan Forestry Research Institute was planted in Asian Valley last year. In 2008, on our last day of collecting in Taiwan, we saw this plant growing above 5,000’ which corresponds roughly to zone 8b, although reports show it to grow another 1,600’ higher. No seeds were present, so we left that plant with just memories. Provenance may play a strong role in determining hardiness. Plants can be propagated by seed or by grafting on A. buergerianum.

Acer buergerianum var. ningpoenseAcer buergerianum var. ningpoense, the Ningpo trident maple, is a variety of trident maple that, although reliably deciduous in zone 7 and growing at the JCRA since 1994, may be evergreen in warmer areas if adequate moisture is supplied through summer and into fall. In the wild in east China (Ningpo, Zhejiang Province), it can attain heights of 60’, but typically forms a small to medium tree in the landscape. The JCRA specimen has grown to over 30’ in 13 years. Somewhat bluish tinged foliage varies from three lobes to none and is about 2” long and wide. Although not evergreen at the JCRA, it may make a nice evergreen or semi-evergreen specimen in the Deep South with the old foliage dropping as the new leaves emerge. The bark peels attractively in thick sheets on mature trees. Propagation is from seed (although isolated specimens often form non-viable parthenocarpic fruit), grafting to A. buergerianum seedlings, or softwood to semi-hardwood cuttings taken from May to September. Overwintering rooted cuttings can be difficult and success may be best with cuttings from early in the season.

Acer buergerianum var. formosanum, the Formosan trident maple, another form of A. buergerianum, is endemic to Taiwan. High elevation forms have proven to be hardy into at least zone 8 where they are mostly evergreen. It is similar in other respects to the species with a powdery blue underside to the leaves. The JCRA’s plants have not yet been planted out to determine their suitability in zone 7.

Acer coriaceifoliumAcer coriaceifolium (syn. A. cinnamomifolium), the leatherleaf maple, is a small tree that has been growing at the JCRA for nine years where it has grown into a 12’ tall tree in the Mixed Border. In the wild, it can grow to nearly 50’, but seems to want to grow as a shrub in cultivation, although a single leader can be trained if desired. The foliage is unlobed, dark to medium green above, and paler and tomentose below. It tends to break dormancy early in the spring, which can be a problem in areas subject to late frosts. New growth emerges pale green and is covered in silvery to coppery hairs, providing a striking contrast to the older dark green leaves. The evergreen foliage is sometimes damaged during cold spells, but plants in the Carolina Piedmont have grown remarkably well. Most, if not all, plants grown in the west are from a distribution by the Shanghai Botanic Garden in 1983 as A. cinnamomifolium. Further hardiness could come from germplasm collected at the highest elevations of its distribution in southwest China. Propagation is typically from seed, although cuttings can be rooted in late May through June.

Acer erythranthum, red-flowered maple, has only recently come into cultivation in the West. It appears to be very closely related to A. laevigatum and may at some point be placed in this group. This species is endemic to a small area of Vietnam near the Chinese border. Small, unlobed foliage emerges reddish in the spring before deepening to dark green. The early spring flowers are reddish against the evergreen foliage. The JCRA’s plant comes from a collection by Dan Hinkley (DJH 06147), who feels that it should prove to be hardy in central North Carolina. It has not been evaluated outdoors as of yet. Propagation is by seed.

Acer fabriAcer fabri, Faber’s maple, is perhaps the most readily available in the trade in the West. Narrow, lanceolate leaves emerge coppery red before turning dark, glossy green. This has proven to be among the showiest of maples in flower with dark red buds opening in late March to reveal white flowers held on crimson pedicels. The fruit is also bright red and continues the show against the glossy foliage. Young stems are green or occasionally reddish. Plants in the wild can grow to 65’, but are typically closer to half that size in cultivation. It tends to grow as a multi-stemmed or low-branching tree unless trained differently. A. fabri appears to be perfectly hardy in central North Carolina with only minimal damage to the branch tips and discoloring of some of the foliage during cold spells. The JCRA plant has been in the ground for over a decade and has performed admirably, growing to 13’ in that time on the east side of the Winter Garden. Propagation is by seed or grafting on A. palmatum.

Acer laevigatumAcer laevigatum, the smoothleaf maple, is a medium sized tree that grows to 50’ in the wild. Young plants have serrate margins on lanceolate leaves, but become entire as the plants mature. New growth is bright red which contrasts nicely with the yellow early spring flowers. Young branches are olive green often with a purplish tinge. Summer fruits also emerge purple-maroon. This tree is found scattered throughout Southeast Asia. The JCRA has plants grown from seed collected at the Shanghai Botanic Garden in 2009, so we haven’t been able to assess its growth in the Arboretum yet. Other plants growing throughout the Southeast have performed well and a specimen at the Charles Keith Arboretum in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is over 10’ tall after being in the ground for 12 years. Propagate by seed or grafting on A. palmatum.

Acer laurinum is a rare tree that was grown at the JCRA from 1996 to 2000 as the synonymous A. decandrum. It died due to late season drought in 2000. It is mainly a subtropical evergreen tree growing to over 80’ tall in the wild, although presumably it will be much smaller in cultivation. New growth emerges bright red-maroon. Hardiness for A. laurinum will depend heavily on the provenance of the germplasm. With a range from China and Cambodia to India, Malaysia, and Thailand, this is the only maple to cross the equator. The hardiest plants will come from the northernmost populations and, most importantly, from the highest elevations near 6,500’–8,500’. Propagation is by seed.

Acer oblongumAcer oblongum, the flying moth maple, grows at medium altitudes to 6,500’ in mountainous regions of Nepal to central China. It forms an upright, oval-headed tree growing to 50’ in the wild, but will be much smaller in cultivation. It is typically described as evergreen, but is a variable species in the wild, ranging from fully evergreen to deciduous. In Frank Kingdon-Ward’s A Plant Hunter in Manipur, he describes the tree as deciduous, but not losing its foliage until the new leaves emerge, qualifying it as evergreen in my opinion. The foliage is often tri-lobed on young, vigorous plants, becoming oblong to ovate with maturity. The foliage is never serrate as in some other closely related evergreen maples. Leaves are leathery, sage green above and paler beneath. Fall color on deciduous plants can be brilliant red to nice yellow to almost nonexistent. The bark is smooth and attractive and there are reports that the bark can peel off in irregular plates, but this has not been the case for trees at the JCRA. The JCRA has several trees in cultivation from different sources. One tree grown from seed of a cultivated plant near Tokyo has been in the ground since 2006 and has grown to 5’. It is fully evergreen but has taken significant damage during most typical zone 7 winters with killed-back branches and damaged foliage. Two other seedlings from wild-collected Chinese seed received from the University of Nebraska and planted in 1996 and 1997 have grown to about 30’ each. One tree has proven to be completely deciduous with excellent autumn color. The other tree has leaves which are semi-persistent with excellent fall color every few years. While the evergreen forms may have potential for Deep South gardens, the tardily deciduous form is a tree worth consideration over a wider area and should be trialed in colder regions. Propagation is by seed, but there has been some success in preliminary cutting trials. Grafting on A. buergerianum may also be possible.

Acer oblongum var. concolor is similar to the species, but has conspicuously white undersides to the leaf and a bluer color overall. The JCRA plants come from Dan Hinkley’s wild-collected Vietnamese material (DJHV 8019) and have not been grown long enough for evaluation.

Acer obtusifolium is one of the more western species of evergreen maple ranging from eastern Turkey into Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Cyprus along coastal mountains. It forms a shrub or can be trained into a small tree about 16’ tall. The foliage is leathery and varies from unlobed to tri-lobed. Leaves are typically gray-green and reliably evergreen in areas milder than central North Carolina. In cooler areas, the foliage will shrivel and eventually drop with no fall color. The JCRA plant survived outdoors for about three years. Its death was probably due to a combination of winter cold and wet feet. Plants will likely perform best if planted in a free-draining soil with some protection from drying winter winds. A. obtusifolium is sometimes lumped with A. sempervirens, but the former’s leaves are conspicuously larger, often to near twice the size. It is synonymous with the names A. orientale and A. syriacum. Propagation is by seed or grafting on A. monspessulanum or A. pseudoplatanus.

Acer paxii, or Pax’s maple, commemorates a German botanist and entomologist named Ferdinand Pax who worked on the taxonomy of maples in between his true passion for butterflies and related insects. This maple from Yunnan Province in China is very similar to the closely related A. buergerianum, with the main distinction being its evergreen foliage. It grows to 32’ in the wild. The foliage is glossy green and typically tri-lobed, but unlobed leaves also appear. The JCRA plant has not been in the collection long enough for an evaluation of its hardiness, although reports indicate small trees are very tender while larger specimens may withstand zone 7b winters. It makes a handsome small tree and can be propagated by seed or grafting on A. buergerianum.

While there is little chance that evergreen maples will supplant our beloved deciduous forms in temperate landscapes, these plants warrant further evaluation to determine their garden worthiness in central North Carolina and beyond. While some will undoubtedly prove to be too tender to become reliable garden plants north of Central Florida, others have the potential to become an important part of the southern landscape.

Wildflowers of the Colorado Rockies

By Tim Alderton, Research Technician

In July, I attended the North American Rock Garden Society’s Annual Meeting in Colorado. The meeting started on July 11, 2010, in Denver at the world-famous Denver Botanical Gardens and then moved to the small town of Salida, Colorado, for the following four days. Attendees came from all corners of the United States and Canada, along with speakers from as far away as the Netherlands, Czech Republic, and Kazakhstan. Aside from all the presentations and interesting plantspeople, the real highlights of the trip were on July 12–14, when we had time to experience the native flora at high elevations in central Colorado.

Aquilegia coeruleaWhile traveling to Salida, a “pit stop” for lunch at the Kenosha Pass campground provided the first taste of what we would see the next two days. On exiting our small charter bus, glimpses of the state flower of Colorado, Aquilegia coerulea, growing among the filtering canopy of aspens, whetted the appetites of the attendees’ curiosity about the flora and distracted them from their lunches. After quickly engulfing my own lunch, I began scouring the campground and surrounding underbrush for wildflowers. It did not take much time to find them. Deep blue and plum-colored Penstemon, pale lavender Erigeron, both creamy yellow/white and fiery red Castilleja, and spikes of purple and white Oxytropis grew scattered under the open canopy and in small clearings. Fluffy, low-growing Juniperus communis insulated the bases of the cool white trunks of some of the aspens. In drier areas, thinly profiled Pinus contorta var. latifolia grew spaced among rocks, providing homes for scattered stalks of Thermopsis montana and squat clumps of the dwarf Solidago simplex. In the open, sprigs of Allium ceruum nodded their heads of pink blossoms above sparse blades of grass and bare ground. Various species of Potentilla grew as both shrubs with dark green leaves and herbaceous clumps with silver foliage. After only an hour or so, we continued on to Salida.

Leaving Kenosha Pass, the topography opened into South Park, an area of high elevation grassland and wetland surrounded by mountains covered in Pinus aristata and Picea species. As we approached Salida, the terrain and the vegetation both began to change again. Along the roadsides, a few cacti and some species of Penstemon, flowering Yucca, and Cleome serrulata grew among scrubby, round-topped pines and oaks, teasing us with what might be found in the surrounding desert. If only I had the opportunity to explore! On arriving in Salida, a plant sale and dinner greeted the attendees at the Steam Plant, the location of the conference for the next three evenings.

On the mornings of July 13 and 14, the attendees broke up into several groups for hikes at five different locations. Each attendee had the opportunity to hike at one location each day. I selected the two hardest ones to visit weeks before going to Colorado, not thinking about the altitude and the issues it can cause a lowlander from the east. Fortunately, aside from a dull headache, the altitude was not a problem.

Weston PassMy first day took me to Weston Pass between Leadville and Fairplay. The pass itself is at 11,900’; the hike took me to about 12,500’. Around the parking area, the abundance of flora could clearly be seen spreading out into an expansive alpine meadow. Just feet from the vans we rode in, Taraxacum ceratophorum, the cousin to everyone’s favorite lawn weed, dandelion, flowered alongside inflorescences of white-petaled, pale blue-stamened flowers of Ipomopsis congesta and the bright yellow blossoms of a clumping Potentilla. Nearby, 10” tall tuffs of Oxytropis sericea erupted with white spikes of small pea blossoms. Mertensia oblongifolia and Polemonium viscosum dotted the landscape with flowers of intense shades of blue that even outdid the pristine azure of the sky. Here and there, the sun-worshiping, oversized, 4”, golden, daisy inflorescences of Tetraneuris grandiflora stood atop 8” tall stout stalks covered in thin pinnatafid leaves. Short clumps of Castilleja occidentalis flowered with pastel yellow bracts surrounding the yellow/green florets.

Silene acaulis var. subacaulescensCrossing the road and walking up a trail leading southwest from the parking area; the flora changed into many low mat-forming species intermixed with the other herbaceous plants already seen across the road. Phlox condensata and Minuartia obtusiloba formed tight ½” tall miniature carpets of snow white blossoms mimicking the patches of snowbanks still surviving on shelter slopes. Open rocky areas also allowed the equally small Silene acaulis var. subacaulescens to flaunt its carpets of pink blossoms. In some areas, Frasera speciosa broke the relative flatness of the meadow with exclamation points of greenish flower stalks rising to 3’, a giant in a world of miniatures. The actual 1”, four-petaled blossoms nestled close to the stout stalk. Each pale creamy yellow/white petal was intricately splotched and dotted with burgundy. Further up on the path, 4” tall clumps of Tetraneuris acaulis var. caespitosa held their 1½” golden yellow inflorescences straight up as if to say, “Here I am! Don’t step on me.” Scattered among them, Erigeron pinnatisectus with pale lavender daisy inflorescence and cut foliage stood out.

On closer inspection of the surrounding ground, more diminutive and carpet-forming species became visible on the scree-covered ground. Silver-green, spade-shaped leaves arranged in multiple rosettes held clusters of alien-looking, scaly, faded gray-burgundy, two-sided seed pods in sets of three to five. Later at higher elevations, I would see this in flower with bright yellow, four-petaled flowers and find it to be a cabbage cousin called Physaria alpina. In spots with a little bit of moisture, wind-trimmed Salix species hugged the ground. Close inspection revealed catkins flowering among the twigs and leaves.

Roses were not to be found on the alpine meadow, but several relatives managed to prosper. Species of the already mentioned Potentilla grew among the rocky soils at all elevations near Weston Pass. Irregularly spotted with 1½”, single, white to yellow-centered, rose-like blossoms, Dryas octopetala subsp. hookeriana formed patches of 2”–3” tall, scalloped-edged, dark green, silver-backed leaves.

Laboring up higher in the thin air and wandering into an area with more soil and moisture brought another change in the flora. More grasses grew with a mixture of wildflowers. Pedicularis parryi, a hemi-parasite, flowered with spikes of pastel yellow and off-white, twisted, mint-like flowers held above rosettes of ferny foliage. A few species of Trifolium made their homes in these open meadows as well. Much more attractive than the Trifolium repens that invades planting beds and lawns in the east, the alpine species have larger individual florets of burgundy (T. parryi), pink (T. nanum), or a bicolor of cream and pink (T. dasyphyllum). Two species of Polygonum also popped up among the grass as well.

Roaming back into the area of loose rocks and scree, I continued to encounter new species. A few species of Draba grew among the gravel and soil, often hugging the protection of larger stones. One, Draba oligosperma, formed tight clumps with short seed stalks. Higher up, I found it in full flower with deep yellow blossoms. The widely distributed Cerastium arvense grew among the rocks along with its Rocky Mountain cousin, Arenaria fendleri. Both provided their white Dianthus like blossoms. Continuing on, I came to the edge of a rocky, south-facing cliff. Along the edge, short patches of the endemic Penstemon hallii flamboyantly flowered with inflorescences of deep purple/blue.

Nearby, overlooking the cliff and a tardily melting snowbank, Penstemon whippleanus also thrust up their spectacular plum-colored blossoms. Spots of yellow from the ever-present Potentilla species and Geum rossii var. turbinatum contrasted with the blues and the purples of the Penstemon. The cliff led the way to the top where additional carpeting species grew on the lean soil. On a ledge just below the top, the almost acaulescent magenta flowers of the dwarf Lewisia pygmaea squeezed between the succulent thin leaves. A short distance away on another ledge, rose relatives Ivesia gordonii, with its ferny foliage and round clusters of yellow blossoms, and Sibbaldia procumbens, with Alchemilla-like foliage and small clusters of yellow flowers, grew protected from the wind.

Sedum integrifolium subsp. integrifoliumDescending the summit and arriving back before the rest of the group, I took the time to explore a boggy spot below the parking area. A melting snowbank provided water to the bog and countless white blossoms of Caltha leptosepala mirrored the snowbank above. Pink spikes of Pedicularis scopulorum, along with the occasional white spike of Pedicularis scopulorum f. album, popped up among dwarf willows. Both the deep burgundy-flowered Sedum integrifolium subsp. integrifolium and pink-flowered Sedum rhodanthum grew along the edge of the bog. Nearby, ridged clumps of Delphinium barbeyi stood in bud, ready to open their intense blue blossoms in the coming weeks. On the saturated gravely slope between the bog and the retreating snowbank, glowing, bowl-shaped, yellow blossoms of Ranunculus adoneus dotted the open expanse. Others joined me in the area, and we spotted little gems like Gentiana prostrata, Oreoxis alpina, and Noccaea montana.

Castilleja miniata and Delphinium barbeyiWe loaded back into the vans and headed to Salida. Our van stopped a few times, allowing passengers to take pictures of clumps of Zigadenus elegans growing alongside Anemone multifida and Ribes. A few feet away, a moist wash was home to countless red Castilleja miniata in full flower, interspersed with deep blue Delphinium barbeyi.

Continuing down the mountain, we stopped at a large patch of some of the last of Iris missouriensis of the season, flowering in the margin of a beaver dam along the road. The flooded area provided homes to Salix species, while on higher ground Potentilla fruticosa and Penstemon procerus flowered in yellow and blue, respectively. On dry ground across the road, a young (maybe 100-year-old) Pinus aristata watched over the botanizing fanatics, wondering what all the commotion was about. We made one last stop at the Weston Pass Campground for a “pit stop” before continuing back to Salida. While everyone was using the rustic outhouses, I ran back up the road a quarter mile to capture pictures of a clump of Penstemon caespitosus growing on the bare bank beside the road. This species grows as a small shrublet covered in sky blue flowers with white throats. Nearby, the ubiquitous Ipomopsis aggregata, with scarlet to salmon blossoms, contrasted with the blue of the Penstemon and grey/brown of the surrounding rocks and ground.

Primula parryiJuly 14 took our group of vans to Mount Sherman, only five or six miles the way the raven flies from Weston Pass, but by terrain it seemed ten times that distance. Mount Sherman, considered the easiest of the fourteeners in Colorado, rises to 14,036’, but I only ventured to about 13,000’. Much higher than that, vegetation dwindled to almost nothing. We parked at an elevation of about 11,900’ and started the much steeper hike up the mountain. Old mine buildings and equipment provided added interest to the expanses of scree and alpine tundra that covered the ground. Along the rough road that led the way up the mountain, a stream of melt water lined with wildflowers greeted the visitors. Some species growing by the stream included Castilleja miniata, Silene acaulis var. subacaulescens, Sedum rhodanthum, and Potentilla fruticosa. Alongside these now familiar wildflowers grew magenta Primula parryi, yellow/green umbrellas of Angelica grayi, and drifts of blue Mertensia ciliata mingling with white Cardamine cordifolia. Spikes of little pink elephant-looking blossoms popped up from the ferny foliage of Pedicularis groenlandica that also inhabited the edges of the cold flowing water.

Botanizing on Mount ShermanStarting the hike up the mountain, I encountered the diminutive legume Astragalus molybdenus, with its pale lavender pea flowers and feathery creeping foliage flowing over the gravel-covered ground along the path. Up on an exposed bank, a clump of intense blue Mertensia oblongifolia, only 6” tall, arched out from between a scattering of loose stones. A short distance away, the Colorado endemic Polemonium confertum, clothed in deep green, ferny foliage holding wide-open, indigo blue blossoms with yellow stamens, grew in an equally rocky situation. Continuing up the trail, many of the plants seen the day before also grew. Patches of Penstemon hallii, mounded tufts of white-flowered Phlox condensata, and Erigeron pinnatisectus, just to name a few, were joined by the clumps of bottle brush-looking purple inflorescences of Phacelia sericea and gold daisy inflorescences of Packera and Senecio species. On slopes protected from wind, shrubby Salix shaded the rosettes of Saxifraga rhomboidea, which then thrust up their 15” stalks topped in clusters of creamy white, five-petaled flowers. In some exposed areas, the 2” tall Salix reticulata var. nana carpeted the ground and crevices between stones with their tufted clusters of heavily veined, rounded leaves and upright catkins. On another bank, Valeriana acutiloba formed clumps of glabrous, entire (no indentations) leaves, topped by expanding inflorescences of the palest pink buds opening to white flowers. Primula angustifolia, tiny, 1”–2” tall plants with disproportionally large, 1”, deep pink flowers with yellow centers, grew in exposed sites with bare soil and a few loose stones. Nearby, Lloydia serotina blew in the brisk wind despite its own small, 4” stature. The scapes holding one to two white, lily-like blossoms blew in the wind between their thin grass-like leaves.

Mount ShermanThe vegetation thinned as the elevation and exposure to wind increased. Following a 4’ wide path edged by a steep slope down on one side and up on the other and composed of the loose spoils of mining from 75–125 years ago, it was amazing to find Claytonia megarhiza with rosettes of thick succulent leaves prospering in the deep substrate of loose shards. At about 12,800’, a few clumps of the rare Chionophila jamesii, with white, one-sided spikes of blossoms like their cousin the Penstemon, flourished in the intense light of the high elevation. A little higher in a patch of tundra, minute specimens of Eritrichium nanum var. elongatum looked like little tuffs of intense blue sky that had fallen to the ground.

I stopped to eat my lunch beside the ruins of the Hill Top Mine at about 13,000’. Spectacular views rewarded me for trudging up the trail, but I had to start back down. Just behind the mine buildings on a plateau, a meadow covered in golden flowers of Geum rossii var. turbinatum, along with a scattering of Castilleja occidentalis, Potentilla, Claytonia megarhiza, Mertensia oblongifolia, and Polemonium confertum, provided my last pictures of the heights. The trek back down still brought new finds. Looking at the seemingly barren rocky spoils, I saw a quarter-sized Androsace septentrionalis camouflaged by its brown/green leaves and the glaring reflected light; it became visible because of the umbel of tiny porcelain flowers. The descent also brought glimpses of Draba crassa, Erysimum capitatum, and Besseya alpina. Breaking from the path, I ventured by a melt water pond and followed a stream where I met up with a group of our botanizing crew. The stream edge was home to large patches of Primula parryi and Anemone narcissiflora var. zephyra, mixing with Geum rossii var. turbinatum, and Sedum integrifolium subsp. integrifolium.

Before going back to the van for the ride back to Salida, I was able to explore below the parking area. There, a large stream provided a home to drifts of flowering Caltha leptosepala and more magenta Primula parryi. On a grassy bank just above the stream, a meadow provided a sampling of all the wildflowers that I had seen while in the mountains. Castilleja miniata were growing next to Castilleja occidentalis, and probable hybrids of the two grew beside Penstemon hallii, Penstemon whippleanus, Potentilla, Fragaria virginiana subsp. glauca, Erigeron, Oreoxis alpina—and the list went on. A great way to finish up my first experience of the Colorado Rockies!

Development

Planting the Seeds for Development

By Anne M. Porter, Director of Development

Membership Makes a Difference

“Membership Makes a Difference” sounds like such a cliché, but there is no other way to say it. Your membership support really does make a difference!

Your support makes the difference between

Just think, the JC Raulston Arboretum touches the lives of people who might never have the money to visit a garden if they had to pay to visit. Who knows, one of the Arboretum’s workshops might turn someone on to plants who then discovers a life-long love of plants, who then makes horticulture a vocational choice, or who then even helps save our planet. The possibilities are endless!

As we celebrate the Arboretum’s 35th anniversary this year, we sincerely thank you, but we also want to challenge you. Since the JCRA’s 30th anniversary in 2006, there has been a slight drop in overall memberships. Yes, the economy has caused us all to reexamine our personal spending and giving priorities, but just think what would happen if every current member invited friends, colleagues, and family to visit and then encouraged them to join. Wow! Aren’t you tired of people saying, “I never knew the Arboretum was here”? We are, too, so please help us spread the word and tell the story of this remarkable garden.

Your membership does make a huge difference, and we thank you for your continued support and advocacy of the JC Raulston Arboretum!

Members Corner

Featuring pictures, stories, and testimonials from JCRA members.

From Dick Pearson, JCRA Volunteer Tour Guide

Dick Pearson and Joan RobertsonSeveral years ago, Bob Lyons asked me to respond to a speaker request in his absence. Gathering and copying slides from Bryce Lane and from J. C. Raulston’s collection with the help of Chris Glenn, I developed a talk entitled “Plant Diversity in the Seasonal Landscape.” The 88 slides that I selected began with Prunus mume in January and ended with a Camellia japonica flowering in December.

Within the last year, I have spoken to two garden clubs, the North Harnett County Seniors, St. Bernadette’s Catholic Church Seniors, and Temple Beth Or Seniors. (I’m waiting to hear from a Hindu or Buddhist temple!) For fun, I raffle off four or five seedlings from my greenhouse. Apart from the enjoyment of social interaction, the real satisfaction is when I hear of new memberships and donations to the JCRA as a result of my speaking engagements and Arboretum tours.

From Kathy Rucker, Long-time JCRA Member from Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tom and Kathy RuckerWe know our neighbors wonder about us sometimes. One reason might be that in our modest yard, no two plants match. JCRA friends know that’s not unusual in an arboretum—but in somebody’s yard? Our love affair with the Arboretum dates back many years ago to the Christmas wreath-making workshop scheduled at the home of J. C. Raulston. I had two tickets but couldn’t cajole anyone else to drive to Raleigh with me to search out a private residence where we were going to spend the day arranging foliage. So my long-suffering husband, Tom, agreed reluctantly to go, after I promised him that he wouldn’t have to make any flower arrangements if he felt his masculinity was being violated. The day turned out to be a delightful mélange of learning about cryptomeria foliage and hollies like ‘Bonfire’, and we came away with holiday arrangements ready to pop on the mantle.

Four days later, we saw a notice in the newspaper that shocked us. J. C. Raulston had been killed in a car crash. We were devastated! We were looking forward to meeting him again after enjoying the workshop at his home, but we never got that chance. However, we did gain an enduring love for his plant collection and for his writings, especially the winter interest gardens which he promoted so vigorously.

So that’s how we got started getting up at 5:30 AM to make that Raleigh trek each year for the Annual Plant Distribution, which coincidentally often falls on my birthday. We’ve tried to corral friends into going with us, but I suspect they really don’t believe us when we tell them that more than 4,000 free plants are eagerly carted away by Friends of the Arboretum members in just five minutes. They just know that we are always out there planting a “few new things” in mid-October, and that our “new friends” have odd names like Osmanthus, Prunus mume, Poncirus trifoliata and Ilex cornuta ‘D’or’.

From Scott Brandis and Jason Jones, Members from Athens, Georgia

Alnus serrulata in Scott Brandis and Jason Jones's gardenLiving in Athens, Georgia, we have found gardeners in the Deep South to be equally passionate about plants as in plant-centric California. On our epic cross-country move from San Francisco in the summer of 1999, our precious collection of plants took up more room in the truck than our possessions! We learned quickly the Deep South is very selective about which plants … and people … will thrive here!

Several opportunities have enhanced our horticultural interest and knowledge, including our tenure as “Farmies” at the UCSC Organic Farm & Garden program (http://casfs.ucsc.edu/) and also as plant propagators for Bay Area landscape architect Ron Lutsko’s personal nursery, which greatly contributed to our propagation knowledge. Here in Athens, we give plant propagation workshops to area gardening clubs.

Our collection of native plants focuses on transition zones from the Piedmont to Mountain and Piedmont to Coastal Plain. As plant collectors, our travels usually involve searching out unique plants and many tales can be told about their acquisition, including racing for unusual plants in the destructive path of bulldozers, almost landing us in the pokey! The rewards of our southern native species can’t quiet our desire for the unusual or unexpected exotics, satisfied through our trips to the JC Raulston Arboretum as well as Woodlanders in Aiken, South Carolina. Our plant collections contain many unusual plants we’ve propagated, and many find their way into landscape projects we jointly design and install.

Our passion for plants led us to become members of the JCRA and has provided a rewarding connection to the Arboretum’s outstanding staff and volunteers. The unique plant collections are not only an inspiration for southeastern landscapes, but also an invaluable source of information and education for those seeking greater understanding of plant communities. Although we are not locals, we are grateful to be part of the JCRA plant community from afar and consider the JC Raulston Arboretum to be an invaluable resource always worth the road trip!

Members Making News

The JC Raulston Arboretum is extremely fortunate to have so many talented friends and donors. If you are a member making news or know of one, please let us know so that we can share it with our arboretum friends.

Tom Krenitsky has written a new book, and he has generously donated 100% of the proceeds to the JC Raulston Arboretum for any books sold at the Arboretum. The book’s title is Planting for Posterity: Forty Years of Gardening in the Carolina Piedmont, and it is a must-read for anyone interested in gardening in our area. Even novice plant lovers will find this book informative and easy to understand. Friends will be delighted to read all of the references about J. C. Raulston and our acclaimed arboretum. This book will have friends wanting to scope out all of the plants that Tom so eloquently writes about. Well done, Tom, and thank you for your generosity toward the JCRA and for writing this very cool book!

Julia and Robert Mackintosh received the 2010 Neighborhood Recognition Awards from the Raleigh Citizens Advisory Council (Glenwood CAC) for maintaining the Margaret Reid Garden, noted for its native plant theme. This award recognizes individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to neighborhoods across Raleigh. Congratulations, Julia and Robert for being among this year’s 15 award-winners! Robert is one of the JCRA volunteers on the Master Plan committee, and he has given countless hours working on the many designs and projects that are making the JC Raulston Arboretum a more wonderful place! Thanks so very much, Robert!

Ted BilderbackTed Bilderback, Ph.D., has a new award—the IPPS Sidney B. Meadows Award of Merit in recognition of his outstanding contributions to plant propagation, the nursery industry, and his dedication to the International Plant Propagator’s Society, Southern Region. The Sidney B. Meadows Award of Merit is the highest award offered by the Southern Region. We’re so proud of you, Ted!

Gala in the Garden: Save-the-Date for the 2011 May Day Gala

Gala 1994, our first May Day GalaThe JC Raulston Arboretum is thrilled to present Susan Woodson as the 2011 honorary chair and Jere Stevens as the 2011 event chair. You will not want to miss the best garden party in Raleigh and see what this dynamic duo, along with their outstanding Gala committee, has in store for the 2011 Gala in the Garden. Remember to mark your calendars for Sunday, May 1, 2011, at 3:00 PM for great food, friends, and a fantastic silent auction—all in a fabulous garden setting! Visit our Web site for more Gala in the Garden details.

2011 Gala in the Garden Committee

Honorary Chair
Susan Woodson

Event Chair
Jere Stevens

Committee
Jill Adams
Jayme Bednarczyk
Jennifer Bernabi
Ted Bilderback
John Buettner
Kathy Deal
Judi Grainger
Larry Hancock
Margaret Hoffman
Patsy Hopfenberg
Beverly Hurley
Jerry Jackson
Cheryl Kearns
Barbara Kennedy
Charlie Kidder
Judy Morgan-Davis
Anne Porter
Frank Powers
Sylvia Redwine
Kathy Myers Reece
Mark Weathington
Chris Cammarene-Wessel
Laura Willer
Jackie Wynne
Helen Yoest

Open Days—Growing Strong

By Jayme Bednarczyk, JCRA Member and Volunteer and Garden Conservancy Regional Representative

Garden Conservancy's logoCollectively, the 2010 Garden Conservancy’s Open Days hosted over 80,000 visitors in private gardens across the country. How’d they do it?

For 15 years, volunteers expressed the desire to be part of the bigger picture in a coast-to-coast garden preservation initiative patterned after a British tradition to identify noteworthy private gardens. Next, they partnered with national sponsors: Garden Design magazine, Burpee Seeds, and Wall Street Journal as well as soliciting regional media support.

Taimi Anderson planted the seed in our region, organizing the event in 2001. Helen Yoest nurtured the event, partnered with the JC Raulston Arboretum, and networked the media tirelessly from 2005–2010. The Raleigh area Open Days Garden Tour has become a regional travel destination and continues to grow each year!

Each spring, the Garden Conservancy publishes the Open Days Directory, a guide listing the dates by state and by month, for those who like to travel and visit gardens. The guide also features the most prestigious public gardens.

Many visitors to the Raleigh area (even the local ones) visited the JC Raulston Arboretum for the first time through the Open Days Garden Tour. Many visitors plan weekend trips around the Open Days locations, delighting in meeting the garden hosts, gathering ideas, learning about new plants, staying at hotels and B&Bs, sampling the local cuisine, and bringing home a plant or two from local nurseries. We consider it “fun” fund raising!

Jeanne and Tom Andrus's gardenSpecial thanks to the 2010 garden hosts: Jeanne and Tom Andrus; Katharine and Nick Davies; Jean and Lawrence Shuping; and Jere and Richard Stevens. We appreciate each of these families for sharing their beautiful gardens with our visitors. The more than $5,000 raised during the 2010 Open Days Garden Tour helped support both the Garden Conservancy and the Arboretum.

The JCRA is pleased to once again partner with the Garden Conservancy Open Days Program in 2011. There are five private gardens (a first time for each garden) on this year’s tour—a petite city chic specimen garden, a tropical jewel box of exotics and sculpture, a charming English heirloom entertaining oasis, a romantic English cottage garden, and a sweeping French country landscape. Plan an outing with friends and save the date for September 17 and 18, 2011. For more information regarding the program and to see a complete schedule, please visit http://www.gardenconservancy.org.

Gift Planning: Change is a Constant

By Sonia Murphy, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Director of Gift Planning

Change is a constant that we all face on a daily basis. My favorite store closes, my grocery store reorganizes its aisles sending me five times around the store for a jar of dried basil.… Policies change, our leadership changes, the financial system changes, even weather patterns change.…

Throughout it all, our arboretum is a constant: a comforting place where its gardens continually appeal to our senses with colors, flowers, seeds, and majestic trees that become more intense as the seasons and years pass. It’s also a rare and liberating place where children can indulge in exploring all of their senses. What a joy!

Just as the plants of the Arboretum weather through the seasons and storms that come through, endowments provide everlasting gifts that weather through the financial storms of our economy to provide support for the Arboretum, students, faculty, staff, programs, and even plant collections.

A family recently shared a story with me about their holiday tradition. Tired of spending time and money shopping for each other, they agreed to give to a charity of their choice and make their gifts in each other’s names. Each year, a family member selects a favorite nonprofit, and all the family members would give to that charity. Then, when everyone is together over the holidays, they talk about the previous year’s gifts and their impact on the chosen program. Just imagine these inspiring and uplifting conversations!

As you plan for the distribution of your estate and the gifts that you will be making to your loved ones through your will, I challenge you to think about using philanthropy to bring your family closer together—the way this family did. You may want to think about adding to your existing endowments through your will or even creating a new endowment. A will bequest (making a gift to a qualified charity through your will) enables you to remain in control of your assets until your passing and it also reduces your Federal estate tax liability, should your estate be liable for Federal estate tax.

If you would like to see what others have done, please visit http://www.legacy.vg/ncsucals/giving/3.html where real donors talk about their planned gifts and what it means to them.

Please contact me at (919) 513-0637 or sonia_murphy@ncsu.edu if you have questions or need more information.

For more information on this or other giving opportunities, please contact Anne Porter at (919) 513-3826 or anne_porter@ncsu.edu or visit http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/advancement/.

Annual Report

A Year in Review

The JC Raulston Arboretum is pleased to present the 2010 Annual Report, recognizing our donors, members, and volunteers. We extend a sincere thank you to all the individuals and organizations that supported the JCRA in 2010. Your support makes possible the continued growth and development of our gardens, plant collections, and educational programs. Plants and gardening nurture the human spirit and enhance our quality of life. We are honored that you have chosen to support this special arboretum as it continues to fulfill its mission of excellence in research, teaching, and public outreach.

Membership Makes a Difference

Through annual membership gifts, these Friends of the Arboretum support: A community resource garden that is free and open to the public every day of the year; a research garden that supports one of North Carolina’s most valuable industries; and horticultural programs and classes that enrich the educational experiences for everyone. Sincere thanks to each and every member!

Friends of the Arboretum Annual Plant Distribution - a favorite event of the JCRA membersBenefactor
Jack and Micki Cox
Pender Nursery (Jim and Kathy Deal)

Founder
Scott Anderson
Malcolm and Patty Brown
David and Catherine Duch
Alan and Martha Finkel
David Griffin
Henry Leon Lobsenz Foundation
Virginia Hester
Ray and Annie Hibbs

Patron
Andrew and Sarah Butler
Johnie and Genelle Dail
Rufus and Linda Edmisten
Falls Revival (Jeffrey Bottoms and John Martin)
Gilmore Plant and Bulb Co.
Robert and Pickett Guthrie
Charles and Kathy Hornbuckle
Jerry and Nina Jackson
Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar
Charles and Wanda Leffler
Richard Pearson and Joan Robertson
Sampson Nursery
Carl and Janet Shafer
Russell and Anthea Tate
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks
George and Reba Worsley
Wyatt-Quarles Seed Co.

Sponsor
Jay Althouse and Sally Albrecht
Ann Armstrong
Robert and Jane Avinger
Thomas and Katherine Barrett
Bartlett Tree Experts
Berylwood Tree Farm
Richard Blanton and Candace Haigler
Donnie and Phyllis Brookshire
Hope Brown
William and Gail Bunce
Thornton Burnet, Jr.
James Bustrack
Carolina Seasons Nursery
Scot and Cindy Chappell
Creative Landscape Designs
Currin’s Nursery
Anne Dahle
Leo and India Davidson
Doris Deal
Jim and Betty Deal
Risa Ellovich
Frankie Fanelli
Gardeners of Wake County
Gardening With Confidence (Helen Yoest and David Philbrook)
Neil and Margaret Harper
Hefner’s Nursery
Karla Jacobus
Shirley Keel and Don Tessman
John and Jamie Kellner
Lady Slipper Garden Club
Alexander and Carol Lawrence
Logan Trading Company
The Lundy Fetterman Family Foundation
Donna Mack and John Stender
Craig and Zermeena Marshall
Kathy Mauney
John and Betsy McBrayer
Ross and Margaret McKinney
Neena Nowell
Outdoor Images
Panther Creek Nursery
Steven and Katharine Perry
Piney Ridge Nursery
Pistole
Pittsboro Place Partners
Planning Strategies
Plantworks Nursery
Gregory and Mary Ann Poole
Wade and Kathy Reece
Ellen Robertson
John and Susan Rountree
Mike and Lynn Ruck
Saunders Brothers Nursery and Orchard
Shelby Nursery/Scottree
Mark Smith
Lois Sowers
Mike Stallings and Mitzi Hole
Swift Creek Nursery
John and Lorely Temple
Turftenders Landscape Services
Fred and Elaine Turner
Jay and Colleen Warfield
Phillip and Sara Watts
Jerry and Adela Whitten
George and Claudia Wilson
Farrell Wise and Levis Handley
Joe and Dana Woody

Corporate/Organization
NC Master Gardener Volunteer Association

Family/Dual
A. E. Finley Foundation
Donald and Jo Ann Adams
Ellen Adams
Howard and Mary Edith Alexander
Lloyd and Donna Allen
Thomas and Jeanne Andrus
Angels’ Gift Farm
Jackie Applegate
Artisan Landscape Design
Bryan and Carol Aupperle
Dianne Austin and Robert Smith
Penn and Carolyn Avera
David and Sandra Bailey
Nancy Balcom-Moskalik and John Moskalik
Walter and Aurelia Baldwin
William and Sandra Barnard
Mark and Beth Barnes
Russ and Mitzie Barnette
Thomas and Lisa Barrie
Joe and Karen Bearden
Angelia Beasley
Clark and Gwen Beavans
Michael and Pam Beck
Jayme Bednarczyk and Philip Abbott
Harriet Bellerjeau
Jean Benjamin
Robert and Rebecca Berrey
Better Tree Care
Ted and Linda Bilderback
Tim and Kylene Bilderback
David and Tammy Biondi
Richard and Susan Bir
Bland Landscaping
Alan and Gene Blatecky
Andrew and Elizabeth Blue
John and Rebecca Board
Thomas and Elizabeth Bodenstine
Zoltan and Nan Bokeny
Edgar and Ethel Boone
Henry and Sory Bowers
Theresa Brackin
Brady & Associates Forestry Services
Christoph and Mireille Bremen
Raymond and Dianne Brinker
Britt/Grant Associates
George and Meriel Brodie
Frances Brogden and Chris Nash
Brookhaven Night Garden Club
Curtis and Patricia Brothers
Bob and Mary Lynn Brown
Charles and Lois Brummitt
Mark Bruno
John Buettner and John Dole
Barbara Buit and Bernadette Kyle
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
David and Patricia Burgess
William and Dorothy Burns
Richard and Nancy Butler
Richard and Carrie Bylina
Basil and Diana Byrne
Lamar and Deborah Caldwell
Weston and Rhonda Caldwell
Edward and Katherine Calt
Elizabeth Calwell
Thomas and Elizabeth Campbell
Bob Cantwell and Lydia Wegman
Wayne and Mary Carlson
Arthur and Jean Chard
John and Molly Chiles
Chris and Jean Christiansen
Allen and Anne Clapp
George and Pam Clark
Brenda Cleveland and Barry Engber
Connie and Laurie Cochran
Coley Bunch Nursery
Matt Conley
Dan and Fairley Bell Cook
Jennifer Cowan and Christopher Daniels
Vivian Coxe and Robert Coxe
Gary and Christi Cramer
Deborah Crandall
Courtney and Kathy Crosby
James and Patricia Cross
Kelly and Patsy Crump
Bill and Mary Cruse
Marc Cubeta and Julie Haigler Cubeta
Custis Nursery
Custom Landscapes (Suzanne and Ed Edney)
Vincent and Sandra Dabrowski
Dan Cochrane
Colin Daniels
Lawrence and Sarah Davenport
Nicholas and Katharine Davies
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Robert and Prudence Dawson
Alexander and Linda De Grand
Gus and Mary Belle De Hertogh
Robert and Ann DeMaine
William Dement, Jr., and Ed Sessoms
Mitchel and Cynthia Dickinson
Danny and Leigh Dixon
Robert and Colleen Dodds
Ron and Jeanette Doggett
Dennis and Claire Drehmel
Drewry Hills Garden Club
Brandon and Ashlee Duncan
Durham Council of Garden Clubs
Earth Graphics of Raleigh (Jeff Evans and Dave Parnell)
Earthscapes
Rich and Sylvia Elwyn
Shelly English and Lex Benton
Ken Esbenshade and Betty Byrum
Paul and Janet Fantz
Victor Farah and Robin Hudson
Martha Farmer
Farmhouse Herbs
Michael and Joy Ferrell
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
Dennis Flood and Carl Duyck
Myron and Ginny Fountain
Powell and Ann Fox
Wayne Friedrich
Kevin and Susan Gantt
Garden & Art Landscapes by Norman Rabins
Garden Club Council of Winston Salem & Forsyth County
Gary’s Nursery
James and Anita Gates
David and Liza Gettles
Edward and Margaret Glazener
Christopher Glenn
Jerome and Linda Glenn
Michael and Holly Gloden
John Godkin, Jr., and Susan Byrd
Andrew and Sheree Goettman
Danold and Marilyn Golightly
Jenny Gore
Karl Gottschalk and Dorothy Pugh
Henry and Ellen Graden
Elizabeth Graff and Scott McLellan
Ronald Grainger
Johnny and Pat Gray
William and Amy Gray
Jeffrey and Sally Greaser
Jason and Cara Griffin
William and Marilyn Grolitzer
Annette Guirlinger
Christopher and Ann Marie Gunter
George and Priscilla Haddad
Thomas and Susan Hadley
Gail Hafley and Chris Merrill
Michael and Eliza Hager
Porter and Marty Halyburton
Greg Hames and Katherine Violette
Douglas and Susan Hammer
Debbie Hamrick and Ed Gaines
Philip and Caroline Hamrick
James and Dorthy Hardin
Brode Harrell, Jr.
Paul and Dixie Harrell
Jonathan Harter and Debra Singer-Harter
Barbara Harvey and Keith Jensen
Guy and Sandy Harwood
Felton and Betty Hastings
Charles Heatherly
Sylvester and Martha Herlihy
Douglas Hill
Hills of Haw Nursery
Kay Linn Hobart
Hoffman Nursery
Paul and Judy Hoffman
Karl and Pauline Hoffmann
Vivian and Lorette Hollinshed
Lawrence and Ilene Holmes
Adam and Maria Holtzman
Harold and Patsy Hopfenberg
Donald and Loretta Hopper
Robert and Roberta Horton
Donald and Carolyn Hoss
Laurie House and John Hopkins
Alton and Ramona Howard
Charlie and June Hoyle
Stephen Hulme and Gloria Barnett
Garrett and Susan Hunter
Jim and Gloria Jahnke
Jere’s Landscaping
Juan and Beth Jimenez
Frederick and Kimberly Johnson
Ozzie Johnson, Jr.
Richard and Emily Joiner
Cecil and Jo Anne Jones
Dave and Anne Jones
Gregory Jones and Evelyn Soto
Jason Jones and Scott Brandis
Bill and Margaret Jordan
Tom Kagan and Amy Mackintosh
Wendy Kanable and Ginna Browning
John and Jane Kanipe
Kenneth and Virginia Karb
Curtis Kasefang and Sharon O’Neill
David Kelley and Jann Martindale
Richard and Melanie Kelley
James and Ellen Kelly
George and Fonda Kendley
Charles Kidder
John and Gloria Kimber
Larry King and Susan Matthews-King
Edmund and Ruth Klemmer
Charles and Amy Kneifel
Stephen and Nancy Knight
Valerie Knowlton
John Kocher and Britt Crews
Patricia Korpik
Charles and Peggy Korte
Jerod and Anne Kratzer
Anita Kuehne and Bill Swint
Ken and Betsy Kukorowski
Jack and Annetta Kushner
Thomas and Christine Laco
Sherrill Laffey
Jack Lamm, II, and Dan Gant
LanArc
Richard and Amelia Lane
Linda Larkins
Richard LaRose
Lewis Lawrence
Anthony LeBude
Darlene Lee and Steve Wales
Terrance and Heather Lenahan
Frank Lewis
Frank and Mildred Liggett
Paul and Cathy Linskens
David and Pamela Livingston
Mary Lorscheider and Jim Britt
Philip and Jamie Lovdal
Michael Loven and Duncan Smith
M. W. Blake Landscaping & Bobcat
Rudolf and Friederike Machilek
Robert and Julia Mackintosh
Kerry and Patricia MacPherson
Heinrich and Martha Malling
Gus and Geary Mandrapilias
Gustavo and Donna Maroni
Gerald and Lynn Martin
Gary Mathews and Eiko Tai
Patrick and Patricia Mattingly
William and Paula Mattocks
Catherine Maxwell and Ben Fewel
Ruth McBride
John and Mary McCormick
Jesse McDaniel and Beverly Thomas
Ralph McDonald and Margaret McLaurin
Al and Sheila McDowell
Jeff and Heather McKay
Mike and Carla McKinney
Thearon and Vanette McKinney
Polly McLaughlin and Rachel McLaughlin
James and Ruth Mead
Ronald and Verna Medeiros
Thomas Melby and Wayne Thompson
Margaret Meyer
Theodore and Jennifer Midthun
David and Frances Miller
Wayne and Jean Mitchell
Jay and Sharon Molvie
Janet Moore and Jennifer Mercer
William and Pamala Muller
Laddie and Edna Munger
Sharon Munger
John and Ann Myhre
Norbert Nevid and Andree Allen
Mac and Lindsay Newsom
Brian and Lou Raye Nichol
Lois Nilsen and John Rogers
Thomas and Jane Norris
Charles and Beverly Norwood
Henry and Heidi Nuttle
David and Cecilia O’Loughlin
Gordon and Alice Oldham
Wouter and Heleen Oudemans
Outer Spaces Landscape Design
Harold and LaDonna Overcash
James and Shirley Overcash
Jesse and Elaine Pace
Winston and Anne Page
Michael Papay
Diana Parrish and Max Wallace
Christopher and Deborah Parsons
Sam and Linda Pearsall
Thomas and Sue Peatross
Kenneth and Ana Pecota
John and Carol Pelosi
Donald Perry, III
Alan Peterson and Priscilla Kistler
Pinkham’s Horticultural Services
William and Emily Powell
Stephen and Jenny Powers
Ronald and Barbara Pratt
Steve and Claire Pratt
John and Charlotte Presley
Robert and Rose Mary Pries
Austin and Cynthia Proctor
Alfred and Suzanne Purrington
Neil and Susan Ramquist
Tom and Amira Ranney
John and Marilyn Ranson
Frederick Ray and Liz Ball
Donald and Cynthia Rayno
Redwine’s Plantscaping & Special Events (Sylvia Redwine)
William and Margaret Reid
Laurie Renz and Connie Renz
Jim and Willa Richardson
Ray Richardson
Rudy Riggs and Jim Phillips
Matthew Robinson and Mary Furr
Rodgers Landscape Services
Jack and Susan Rollins
Michelle Rose and Steven Waleski
Robert Rossier and Eldred Hudson
Ben and Jeanne Rouse
Michael and Dawn Rozzo
Thomas and Kathy Rucker
David Sabio and Christine Doyle-Sabio
John and Jayne Sahadi
Richard and Judith Salentine
David and Beatrice Sanford
David and Carole Saravitz
Charles and Mary Sawyer
Gary and Lee Schaffer
James Schlitt
L. M. Schmitt and Ralph Leggett
John Schott
Stephen and Colleen Schroedl
Chad and Lisa Schutte
Pablo and Patricia Scolnik
Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College
Donald and Patricia Scott
Randy and Becky Screen
Walter and Bonnie Shackelford
Jule and Mary Lou Shanklin
Robert and Connie Shertz
Robert Shore
Lawrence and Jean Shuping
Michael and Evaron Sigmon
Ian and Talmadge Silversides
Gilbert Simmers and Kathleen Adams-Simmers
Sims Farms
Thomas Skolnicki and Kevin Kane
Chip and Celeste Sloop
Lynn Smiley and Richard King
Jeffrey Smith and Bea Young-Smith
Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance
Bruce and Laura Spader
Robert and Patricia Spearman
Herbert and Andrea Sprott
Samuel and Marie St. Clair
Donald and Sylvia Chi Stanat
Edward and Anita Stejskal
Paul and Kim Stephenson
George and Rose Ann Stilwell
C. B. and Carol Strange
Sidney and Rachel Strauss
Sugarbush Gardens
Robert and Dorothy Suggs
Edward and Janice Swab
Ann Swallow
James and Lynn Swanson
Rodney Swink and Juanita Shearer-Swink
Edward and Michele Szwedo
Frederick and Myra Taylor
Steven and Patricia Taylor
Nile Testerman, Jr., and Elizabeth Austin
Dwight and Susan Thomas
John Thomas and Dale Batchelor
Marvin and Ann Thompson
Steve and Lisa Thompson
Walt and Kathleen Thompson
Randall and Christine Thomson
Robert and Margaret Thornton
Nadine Tope
Transplant Nursery
Triangle Bonsai Society
William and Jane Tucker
Gerald Tynan and Martha Stark
Henry and Nancy Unger
The Unique Plant
Betsy Viall
Tom Wagner and Dhivya Muralishankar
Hallie Walker and Jacquelyn King
Jared Walker
Christopher Ward
Arthur and Jacqueline Warner
WaterWise Garden Design
Gregory and Laura Anne Welch
Dee Welker
Thomas Wentworth and Linda Rudd
Dennis and Georgina Werner
Tommy and Holly West
Glenda Westbrook-Neilsen and Kenneth Neilsen
Lane and Linda Wharton
Thomas and Laura Whatley
Steven and Patricia Wheaton
Ralph and Cheryl Whisnant
David White and Janine LeBlanc
David and Carolyn White
Harold and Kathryn Wiebusch
Frederic Wightman and Doris Kistler
Bill and Libby Wilder
Bobby Wilder
James and Glynis Wilkes
David and Judiann Wilkinson
John and Debbie Williams
William and Barbara Winn
James and Brenda Woodley
Randy and Susan Woodson
Worthington Farms
Richard and Amy Woynicz
Malcolm and Donna Wright
Susan Wyatt and Robert Kellam
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne
Philip and Louise York
Smedes and Rosemary York
Dora Zia
James Zieger and Rossy Garcia
Sandra Zinn

Individual
Lynn Abram
Rosanna Adams
Shirley Adams
Audrey Adcock
Virginia Adkins
Anne Albright
Tim Alderton
John Alexander, Jr.
Ross Allard
William Alston
Amaryllis Gardens
Geoffrey Anderson
Linda Anderson
Susan Andrews
Jim Apken
Appeldoorn Landscape Nursery
Arbor Enterprises
Arborcrest Gardens
Arboretum Wespelaar
Arborvillage Farm Nursery
Architectural Trees
Arnette B. Clark Design
Stacey Baer
Pamela Baggett
Eloise Baines
Betty Baker
Melba Barden
Joyce Barefoot
Carol Barmann
Nancy Bartlett
Arthur Baugh, III
Norman Beal
Daphne Beck
Alexander Belskis
Sylvia Bennett
Teri Bennett
Jan Beresford
Meredith Berry
Frederick Bertram
Ruth Bierhoff
Big Branch Nursery
Diane Birkemo
Fred Blackley
Naomi Bloom
Deborah Bonné
Katie Boone
Patricia Booth
Nancy Bost
David Bowers
Lucy Bradley
Vandy Bradow
Judy Bradyhouse
Audrey Brantly
Carol Breckheimer
Robert Brickhouse
The Brickman Group
Adrian Bridges
Sharon Bright
Brookscapes
Barbara Brown
Mary Brown
Charles Browning
Mary Louisa Bryant
Buds & Blooms Nursery
Betty Buffington
Twila Buffington
Wayne Buhler
A. J. Bullard, Jr.
Jean Burda
Debra Burke
Allen Bush
Chip Callaway
Anne Calta
Camellia Forest Nursery
Chris Cammarene-Wessel
Lori Campbell
Lynn Canada
Carolina Country Club
Carla Carpenter
Karen Cayes
Debbie Chacos
Katherine Chambers
Pamela Chance
Rajat Chander
Michael Chaney
Winston Charles
Michael Chelednik
Cheryl Kearns Landscaping
Jane Chiles
Leigh Ann Cienek
Bernadette Clark
Beth Cleveland
Bruce Clodfelter
Joan Cobb
Rebecca Collis
Martha Combs
Eileen Conklin
June Corsetti
Cottage Garden Landscaping
Kirtley Cox
Mike Cox
Gretchen Cozart
Elizabeth Crews
Sherman Criner
Margaret Crooks
Tammie Crosier
Delores Crotts
Chicita Culberson
Heather Curcio
Cindy Dameron
Kristen Daniels
Jinnie Davis
Rosanne Davis
Donna Deal
Nancy Doubrava
Carl Derry
Lacy Dick
Valerie Domanico
Alexander Donaldson
Cynthia Dowdy
Sylvia Drew
Melissa Dudley
Carol Durham
Jared Dutton
C. J. Dykes
Earthly Delights
Sally Edwards
Tim Elliott
Wendy Elliott
Hilde Errico
Ervin Evans
Mary Lou Eycke
Fair View Nursery
Faust Nursery
Anne Feind
Robert Ferone
Jack Finfrock
Margaret Fisher
Fishing Creek Tree Farm
Carol Fishman
Roland Flory
Janet Floyd
Libby Fogleman
Jeff Forshee
Nancy Foster
Friendly Garden Club
Catherine Gaertner
Lena Gallitano
Alan Galloway
Billie Jo Garcia
The Garden Collection
Garland C. Norris Co.
Gary Jewell & Co.
Vince Gentry
Barbara George
Kathleen George
Jeanette Germaine
Charles Gilliam
Nathan Gilliatt
Dollie Glaum
Kathleen Glenister
Goddin Landscape & Maintenance
Joe Godfrey
Ann Goebel
Victor Gordon
Amy Goswick
Patricia Grady
Elizabeth Graham
Lisa Ferguson
Susan Grayson
Moira Griffin
Nancy Griffin
Noel Griffin
Richard Gurkin
Walter Gutierrez
Elizabeth Guzynski
Jenny Haire
Paige Hall
Jane Hallberg
Whitney Hames, Sr.
Jocelyn Hamilton
The Hamlin Cos.
Brenda Hamm
Carolyn Happer
Irma Hardy
P. M. Hardy, III
Judy Harmon
Jacqueline Harper
Phyllis Harrison
Richard Hartlage
Thomas Harville
Barbara Haskell
Awatif Hassan
Thomas Hawkins
The Hayter Firm
Deane Heenan
John Hefner
Marcy Hege
Alice Heins
Jenny Helms
Margaret Helms
Warren Henderson
Anderson Hensley
Christopher Herbstritt
Leslie Herndon
Mary Benjamin Hester
Eric Hinesley
Robert Hinson
Eric Hirsch
Carol Hogue
Laura Hoke
Bradley Holland
James Holland
Marcia Hollis
Darlene Houlihan
Marc Houyoux
Marty Howard
Ann Howell
Patricia Hudson
Martha Huggins
Cyndy Hummel
Matt Hunter
Thomas Hunter, Jr.
June Hutson
Gail Ingram
Linda Jaeger
Edwin Jenkins
Kata Jenkins
Peter Jennings
Jericho Farms
Ellen Johnson
Opal Johnson
Lloyd Jones
Shirley Jones
James Jordan, Jr.
David Katzin
Kristen Keenan
Lucille Keenan
Gary Keim
Arthur Kelley
Sheila Kellogg
Mary Kelly
Olivia Kemp
Barbara Kennedy
Frances Kerr
Doris Kester
Tim Ketchie
Helen Key
Robert Kinch
Mary King
Jennette King
Ellen Kinnee
Marlene Kinney
Lyla Kloos
Faye Koonce
Ekaterina Korobkina
Ed Kristensen
Charles Kronberg
Diane Kuzdrall
Carolyn Lackey
Lake View Daylily Farm
Josephine Lamberto
Landscapes Alive
Virginia Lawler
Linda Lawson
Rebecca Lee
Wyatt LeFever
Legacy Lighting
Mike Lehmann
Eric Lentz
Virginia Leone
Elizabeth Levine
Denis Levy
Betty Lewis
Brian Light
Cynthia Lincoln
Betsy Lindemuth
Linden Landscape Design
Elsa Liner
Carolyn Littles
Lorayne Locke
Longview FFA
Longwood Gardens
Elizabeth Lord
Mike Lowe
Eileen Lowenbach
Beth Lowery
Dustin Loyd
Pete Lucey
Bryan Luisana
Harry Luther
Karen Lynch
Elizabeth Lyne
Lynn van Dokkum Photography
Robert Lyons
MACHO Garden Club
Alan MacIntyre
Cynthia Madden
Nona Malcom
Sarah Marano
Alison Martin
Marie Martin
Susan Mastro
Barbara Mattingly
Terry May
Mary McClure
Charles McCue, Jr.
Ida McCullers
Diane McDaniel
Janet McGettrick
Alberta McKay
Mary Ann McKinney
Rosalind McMillan
Leigh Meese
Larry Mellichamp
Rita Mercer
Meyer Orthodontics
Peggy Meyer
Carolyn Miller
Marlyn Miller
James Minor
Lori Morgan
Shannon Morgan
Jainel Morris
Jeffery Morton
Marsha Munn
Cora Musial
Mary Jo Muzzey
Katherine Myers
Jennifer Myers
Bruce Narveson
Nature’s Art by Susan Aldworth
Rebeccah Neff
Niche Gardens
Hilary Nichols
Phil Normandy
Elizabeth Norval
Hughen Nourse
Janis Nutt
Flora O’Brien
Mary Elizabeth O’Connor
Maggie O’Connor
Old Courthouse Nursery and Mac Farms
Diane Olson
Arleen Orndorff
Fredrick Osborne
Betty Ossi
Mary Overcash
Beth Owens
Elizabeth Page
Ginny Parker
Parkway Lawn Maintenance
Mary Belle Pate
Sandra Paur
Mary Peele
Barbara Perry
Jo Perry
Terry Perry
Karin Petzold
Rose Phillips
Betty Pipes
Mike Pittman
Patricia Poe
Catherine Poff
Edward Ponek
Anne Porter
Dixie Porter
Jacklyn Posner
Jeffrey Preddy
Elizabeth Pringle
Jacqueline Quinn
Patricia Rago
Raleigh Garden Club
Martha Ramirez
Graham Ray
Carol Reaves
Kirsten Reberg-Horton
Redbud Designs
Kathleen Redfern
Alexandra Reid
Renz Landscape & Irrigation
Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment
Katherine Reynolds
Jodi Riedel
Jessica Rigouard
Sarah Rigouard
Michael Roberson
Matthew Roberts
Maxwell Rogers
Louise Rogers
Kelly Rowells
The Royal Gardens
Jean Rundquist
Mary Russell
Judy Ryan
Mary Safrit
Carol Sass
Sandra Savage
Amanda Saville
Harriet Sayre-McCord
Arty Schronce
Garrison Scott
Jim Seaman
Paulina Seila
Tatiana Seltzman
Carol Sexton
Sharpe Foundation
Anita Shawver
Brenda Shelman
James Sherwood, Jr.
Kay Shiflett
Mark Shuman
Tracy Sides
Sally Day Siggens
Marianne Silver
Nancy Simonsen
Algie Simpson
Elaine Sisko
Patsy Skinner
Amy Slater
Brandon Smith
Christopher Smith
David Smith
SOD
Laurie Sorge
Southern Horizons Landscaping
James Sovine
Michael Spafford
Esther Spaltenstein
Judy Springer
Priscilla Sprunt
Eileen Stahl
C. F. Stallings, Jr.
Annabelle Stein
Carol Stein
Flo Stein-Bolton
Susan Stephenson
Jane Stikeleather
Mary Ann Streeter
John Suddath
Edna Suggs
Lynn Sullivan
Marguerite Summers
Swanson & Associates
Prudence Swartwood
Betsy Sykes
Beverly Taylor
Cheri Taylor
Isabel Taylor
Taylor’s Nursery
Cherlynn Tchir
The University of Tennessee Gardens
Alden Thompson
Lois Thompson
Renata Thompson
Sharon Thompson
Carol Thomsen
Terry Thorne
Tracy Traer
Anna Troutman
Tricia Tumminello
Laura Turas
Lynda Turbeville
Tween Streams Gardens
Valerie Tyson
Effie Underwood
Karen Untz
Willem Van Eck
Yvonne Vickery
Vrb Photography
Lynda Waldrep
Daryl Walker
Roger Ward
William Warner
Donna Warren
Sarah Warren
Donna Watkins
Gwendolyn Watkins
Mark Weathington
Apryl Webb
Patricia Weisbrodt
Aaron West
Elisabeth Wheeler
Sara Wheeless
Robert Whisnant
Marshall Whitehurst
Sheila Wilkerson
Katherine Williams
Nancy Williams
Elizabeth Williamson
Carol Wilson
Donald Wilson
James Wilson, Jr.
Stephen Wirth
Barbara Wishy
John Wood
Nancy Woods
Laura Wright
Jewel Wynns
Anna Yarborough
Susan Yarger
Edward Yellig
Dana Zamiara
Elizabeth Ziegler

Student
Nicholas Allen
Justin Beers
Danica Cullinan
Minda Daughtry
David Drews
Tracey Ewing
Cari Grindem-Corbett
Laura Hartman
Isaac Hilton
Laura Lamm
Sarah Leach
Colin Lickwar
Paul Magdarz
Brenda May
Robert Nichols, III
Adam Parrish
Rebecca Pledger
Kimberly Richter
William Smith
Andrew Stieneke
Anna Szamosi
Pamela Taheri
Laura Tollini
Laura Weaver
Chase Werner
Matt White
Matthew Whitfield
Brannon Williams
Sandra Wolfe

Gifts of Membership

These friends of the Arboretum gave the distinctive gift of membership to friends, colleagues, and loved ones. Thanks for giving the gift of a JCRA membership—a gift that keeps on giving all year!

Lloyd and Donna Allen
Shelle Altieri
Thomas and Jeanne Andrus
Bayer Advanced
BB&T Insurance Services
Jayme Bednarczyk and Philip Abbott
Bell Family Foundation
Claude and Mary Caldwell
Irene Carranza
Scot and Cindy Chappell
Vivian Coxe and Robert Coxe
Kelly and Patsy Crump
Dan Cochrane
Howard and Diane Everhart
Falls Revival (Jeffrey Bottoms and John Martin)
Alan and Martha Finkel
Wayne Friedrich
Garland C. Norris Co.
David Griffin
Robert and Pickett Guthrie
W. R. and Margaret Helms
Christopher Herbstritt
Virginia Hester
Ray and Annie Hibbs
Sheila Kellogg
Paul and Phebe Kirkman
Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar
LanArc
Charles and Wanda Leffler
Betty Lewis
Patrick and Patricia Mattingly
Susan Myers
Richard Pearson and Joan Robertson
Pender Nursery (Jim and Kathy Deal)
Wade and Kathy Reece
Rudy Riggs and Jim Phillips
Jessica Rigouard
Riverbanks Zoo and Garden
Mark Rozzo
Jane Stikeleather
Jared Walker
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks
Worthington Farms
Anna Yarborough
Mary Yarborough

Major Gifts to the Arboretum

These extraordinary Friends of the Arboretum made significant gifts in 2010 for the support of major development and the further expansion of the Master Plan initiative. Thank you for the foresight and vision to make the Master Plan a reality and the JC Raulston Arboretum a more vibrant garden experience!

Donald Moreland
Mike Stallings and Mitzi Hole

Endowments

An endowment is a lasting legacy. A special thanks to these donors for their foresight and generosity. Contributing to an endowment is a long-term investment that provides financial stability for the Arboretum year after year. For more information on how you can create an endowment to benefit the JC Raulston Arboretum, please contact Anne Porter at (919) 513-3826.

Harvey Bumgardner Endowment
Lee Bumgarner and Alisa Huffman

Endowment for Excellence
Berylwood Tree Farm
Malcolm and Patty Brown
Camellia Forest Nursery
Chris Cammarene-Wessel and Rich Wessel
Jack and Micki Cox
Dan Cochrane
Dennis and Claire Drehmel
Paul and Janet Fantz
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
Ray and Annie Hibbs
J. Frank Schmidt Family Trust
Richard and Melanie Kelley
Ken and Betsy Kukorowski
James and Ruth Mead
Pender Nursery (Jim and Kathy Deal)
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne

Robert E. Lyons Internship Endowment
Tim Alderton
Ted Bilderback
Bernadette Clark
Judy Morgan-Davis
Nancy Doubrava
Christopher Glenn
Barbara Kennedy
Faye Koonce
Ida McCullers
Cora Musial
Rebecca Pledger
Anne Porter
Ann Swallow
Valerie Tyson
Mark Weathington

Internship Program

These special donors have invested in our students and in the future of the JCRA. Internships are a win-win opportunity for everyone. Thank you for contributing to this sound investment!

Rebecca Pledger, Colin McCarty, Heather Ridlon, Robert Nichols, and Katie Perry, the summer 2010 internsA.I.S.
Allen and Betty Adams
W. J. and Linda Alphin
William and Lide Anderson
Martha Ashby
Edward and Corinna Bailey
Joyce Beach
Bell Family Foundation
Bloomsbury Garden Club
James and Rita Borden
Mary Bost
Julia Bowers
John and Janice Branch
Brookhaven Night Garden Club
Hadley and Cameron Callaway
Jessie Cannon
Shirley Clark
Colony Woods Garden Club
Commercial Carolina Corporation
Grady and Elizabeth Cooper
William and Sally Creech
Custis Nursery
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Nelson Dollar
Down to Earth Garden Club
George and Lynn Edwards
Kurt Eichenberger and Donna Anderson
Allan and Susan Eure
Lynn and Faye Eury
Richard and Adrienne Ferriss
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
Peggy Flowers
The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program
Fred and Jane Given
Pat Grainger
Greenleaf Nursery Co., North Carolina Division
Debbie Hamrick and Ed Gaines
Cynthia Henshaw
The Herb Society of Wake County
Hills and Pines Garden Club
Richard and Rebecca Hoggard
Lawrence and Ilene Holmes
Timothy Holscher
Josh and Rae Hutchins
Helen Jenkins
Shirley Jones
William and Mary Joslin
Charles Kidder
Caroline Luckett
Bruce and Susan Lueck
The Lundy Fetterman Family Foundation
MacGregor Downs Garden Club
Raymond and Betty Ellen Madry
Master Gardener Group of Gaston County
Joseph and Lydia Masterson
Neill McLeod
Ronald and Verna Medeiros
Harold Medlin, Sr.
Denny and Rita Mercer
William and Mina Miller
David and Jean Millward
Nature’s Art by Susan Aldworth
Jeff and Amy Oakes
Carolyn Palmer
William Palmer
Stephen and Irina Palumbo
Patchwork Garden Club
Perkins, Lund, Collar & Associates
Piedmont Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society
Jack and Dixie Porter
John and Charlotte Presley
George and Ethel Pruden
Pullen Park Golden Years Club
Laurinda Queen and Dan Burleson
Raleigh Garden Club
Tom and Amira Ranney
James and Rebecca Shue
Starmount Garden Club
Henry and Jane Steele
George and Karin Stephens
Taylor’s Nursery
William and Katie Toole
United Way of the Greater Triangle
Paulette van de Zande
Sarah Vogler
Charlotte Wainwright
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks
Warsaw Garden Club
Thomas and Laura Whatley
Bobby Wilder
Larry and Laura Wooten
Louis and Lytle Wooten
Smedes and Rosemary York

Other Gifts to the Arboretum

Heartfelt thanks to these donors who gave special gifts to the Arboretum over and above membership.

The JCRA started planning a Children's Program in late 2010.  Gifts helped make this possible.Rosanna Adams
Sheila Ainbinder
Linda Anderson
Tom and Kathryn Anderson
Robert and Evelyn Andrews
Thomas and Jeanne Andrus
Jackie Applegate
Joseph and Sarah Archie
Ann Armstrong
Robert Azar
Melba and Camille Barden
Bayer Advanced
Bell Family Foundation
Jack and Patricia Benson
Big Branch Nursery
Robert and Sandra Birckhead
Fred Blackley
Matthew and Beth Bland
Sylvia Blankenship
Richard Blanton and Candace Haigler
Frank Blazich
Erin Bohner
Mary Boss
David and Adrienne Bowers
Robert and Lucy Bradley
Audrey Brantly
Frank and Lynda Bridger
Malcolm and Patty Brown
John Buettner and John Dole
Tom and Marie Bumgarner
William and Gail Bunce
Tommy Bunn
James Bustrack
Claude and Mary Caldwell
Lynn Canada
Margie Castleberry
Cheryl Kearns Landscaping
Elmira Choopani
Steve and Pam Clark
Connie and Laurie Cochran
Ed and Virginia Cockrell
Coley Bunch Nursery
William and Ann Collins
Albert Cooke
Sandra Coughlin
Dale Cousins
Roger and Rose Crickenberger
James Crites
Ed and Emily Croom
Kelly and Patsy Crump
Custom Brick Co.
Nicholas and Katharine Davies
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Mary Jane Davis
Gus and Mary Belle De Hertogh
Ralph Dean and Nancy Doubrava
District 11/Garden Club of North Carolina
Kimberly Dittmann
David and Catherine Duch
R. A. Dudley Nurseries
Bill and Ann Duke
Earth Graphics of Raleigh (Jeff Evans and Dave Parnell)
Rufus and Linda Edmisten
Alan and Elaine Erwin
Ken Esbenshade and Betty Byrum
David and Tracey Ewing
Fair Products
Alan and Martha Finkel
Roland and Connie Flory
Yvonne Fogle
Bill Fonteno
Carolyn Fulcher
Tom and Betty Gilmore
Karyn Gloden
Jeff Glutz
Ann and Tom Goebel
Raymond and Susan Goodmon
Alexander and Evgenya Gorodezky
Perry and Patricia Grady
Elizabeth Graff and Scott McLellan
Cynthia Green and Bruce Martin
Annette Guirlinger
Michael and Eliza Hager
Hall’s Plants & Produce
The Hamlin Cos.
Larry and Kathy Hancock
Richard and Alice Hardy
Frank and Judy Harmon
Jacqueline Harper
Kathy Hart and Micheal McDonald
Guy and Sandy Harwood
Jane and R. S. Hawk
Eleanor Hawkins
Charles Heatherly
Hefner’s Nursery
Ben and Valerie Henshaw
Sylvester and Martha Herlihy
Joe and Sandra Hice
Kay Hill
Charles and Anne Hines
Lawrence and Ilene Holmes
Richard and Judy Hoyt
Brian Jackson
jaGG Classic Wholesale
Jim and Gloria Jahnke
Jericho Farms
Lori Jones
Shirley Jones
William and Mary Joslin
Charles Keith and Muki Fairchild
Richard and Melanie Kelley
Sheila Kellogg
Mary Kelly
Loren and Barbara Kennedy
Martha Keravuori
Bradley and Deanna King
Walter Klausmeier
Helen Kraus
Charles Kronberg
Anita Kuehne and Bill Swint
Susan Lamb
Richard and Amelia Lane
Eugene and Vicky Langley
Charles and Wanda Leffler
Legacy Lighting
Terri Leith
Rich Leonard and Whitney Cain
Michael and Virginia Leone
Richard and Kathleen Lessard
Frank Lewis
Sue Little
Amanda Lynch
Robert Lyons
William Macnamara, Jr.
Laurence and Clare Maddison
Nona Malcom
Tift and Dabney Mann
John and Elizabeth Matthews
Caroline McCall
Mike and Carla McKinney
Thearon and Vanette McKinney
Anne McLaurin and Charles Meeker
Jan McLaurin
Meg McLaurin and Ralph McDonald
Ronald and Verna Medeiros
John and Bonnie Medinger
Larry and Audrey Mellichamp
Elisabeth Meyer
David and Jean Millward
Wayne and Jean Mitchell
Thomas and Virginia Monaco
Efren and Gabrielle Morell
Robert Mottern, III
NC State University Woman’s Club
Jim and Judy Newman
North Carolina Commercial Flower Growers Association
North Carolina Poultry Federation
Northwoods Garden Club
James and Jane O’Neal
Oakmont Nursery
Marc and Ann Okner
Janice Olsen
Richard and Erin Olsen
Art Padilla and Laura Lunsford
Daniel and Elizabeth Page
Elizabeth Parker
Ginny Parker
Parker’s Landscape Services
Sandra and R. J. Paur
Pender Nursery (Jim and Kathy Deal)
Alan Peterson and Priscilla Kistler
Charles and Vicki Phaneuf
Pi Alpha Xi, NC State University
Piedmont Carolina Nursery
Al and Sylvia Pleasants
Kevin and Ellen Powell
Quail Ridge Books
Raleigh Garden Club
Tom and Amira Ranney
Philip and Rebecca Redwine
Nancy and W. E. Reid
Edward and Vernessa Roberts
Charles Rodes and Tina Belmaggio
Rodgers Landscape Services
Robert Rogers
Robert Rossier and Eldred Hudson
Amy Sams
David and Carole Saravitz
Diane Schaaf
James Schlitt
Mike and Gayle Sheppard
David and Barbara Shew
Betsy and Greg Sigmon
Bobby Sloan
Stephen and Georgiana Snyderman
Daniel and Carolyn Solomon
Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance
Anne Spafford
Mike Stallings and Mitzi Hole
Steven and Theresa Starkey
Josh and Camber Starling
State Employees Combined Campaign
Susan Stephenson
Marshall and Jan Stewart
George and Rose Ann Stilwell
Gayle Streifford
Edna Suggs
Jane Sundin
Gwen Sutton
Priscilla Swindell
Elaine Tarkington
Cheri Taylor
Timothy and Charlotte Thomas
Barbara and Derek Thompson
Triangle Gardener (Beverly Hurley)
Lynda Turbeville
Twin City Garden Club
Gerald Tynan and Martha Stark
John and Barbara Vandenbergh
Kim and Shari Vincent
Khanh Vu
Elisabeth Ward
Roger Ward
Frank Weedon
George Wellons
Dennis and Georgina Werner
Ralph and Cheryl Whisnant
Robert Whisnant
James and Beverly Wiggins
Bill and Libby Wilder
Bobby Wilder
Corinne Wildman
David and Judiann Wilkinson
Edward and Cornelia Willer
Rosemarie Wilson
Mary Lib Wood
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne
Z Enterprises
Dana Zamiara
Dora Zia

Matching Gift Companies

Corporate matching gift programs are a great way to optimize individual gifts to the JCRA. We sincerely appreciate the generosity of the corporations that sponsor these programs and the donors who make the initial gift to benefit the Arboretum.

BASF Corporation
GlaxoSmithKline
IBM
Metropolitan Life Foundation
Monsanto Fund
Pfizer Foundation
Saint-Gobain Corporate Foundation
Schneider Electric/Square D Foundation
Tyco International

Gifts in Honor

Thanks to these friends who honored and paid tribute to special people through their gifts to the JCRA.

In Honor of Tim Alderton
Starmount Garden Club

In Honor of Anita Bess
Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment (RISE)

In Honor of Tom J. and Marie L. Bumgarner
Lee Bumgarner and Alisa Huffman

In Honor of CALS Advancement Colleagues
Chris Cammarene-Wessel and Rich Wessel

In Honor of Anne Clapp
Virginia Hester
MacGregor Downs Garden Club

In Honor of Barbara Fair, Ph.D.
Pi Alpha Xi, NC State University

In Honor of Chris Glenn
Noel Griffin

In Honor of Holly and Michael Gloden
Karyn Gloden

In Honor of Carolyn and Donald Hoss
Daryl Walker

In Honor of Nina and Jerry Jackson
Joseph and Sarah Archie
Elizabeth Parker

In Honor of Charlie Kidder
Down to Earth Garden Club

In Honor of Amelia Lane
Jack and Dixie Porter

In Honor of Chris and Carol Leach
Sarah Leach

In Honor of Jerry and Barbara Michael
David and Beatrice Sanford

In Honor of Monrovia Growers
Hall’s Plants & Produce

In Honor of Marge O’Keeffe
Margie Castleberry

In Honor of Anne Porter
Bobby Wilder

In Honor of Anne Porter and Judy Morgan-Davis
William and Mary Joslin

In Honor of Kay Shiflett
Joseph and Lydia Masterson

In Honor of Lawrence and Jean Shuping and Brandon Duncan
MacGregor Downs Garden Club

In Honor of Mark Weathington and Tim Alderton
Richard and Amelia Lane

In Honor of Bobby Wilder
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis

Gifts in Memory

Heartfelt thanks to these friends who donated memorial gifts in fond remembrance of their loved ones and friends.

In Memory of LeNeve “Ollie” Adams
Allen and Betty Adams
W. J. and Linda Alphin
William and Lide Anderson
Martha Ashby
Joyce Beach
James and Rita Borden
Jessie Cannon
Grady and Elizabeth Cooper
William and Sally Creech
Kurt Eichenberger and Donna Anderson
Fred and Jane Given
Cynthia Henshaw
Richard and Rebecca Hoggard
William and Mary Joslin
Bruce and Susan Lueck
Raymond and Betty Ellen Madry
Neill McLeod
Anne Ransdell
Henry and Jane Steele
George and Karin Stephens
Allen and Betsy Sterman
William and Katie Toole
Charlotte Wainwright
Smedes and Rosemary York
In Memory of L. W. Allen
Lloyd and Donna Allen

In Memory of Kim Archer
David and Sandra Bailey
Mary Boss
Albert Cooke
Eleanor Hawkins
Josh and Rae Hutchins
Bradley and Deanna King
Kevin and Ellen Powell
Robert Rogers
Elaine Tarkington
Sarah Vogler
James and Beverly Wiggins

In Memory of Ronald L. Bradow, Ph.D.
Vandy Bradow

In Memory of Linda Bunn
Pat Grainger
Larry and Laura Wooten

In Memory of Virginia “Ginger” Clark
Shirley Clark
Peggy Flowers
Timothy Holscher
Daniel Jenkins
Helen Jenkins

In Memory of Betsy C. Daniels
Amanda Lynch

In Memory of Eunice Deerhake
Brookhaven Night Garden Club

In Memory of Donald Fair
Pi Alpha Xi, NC State University

In Memory of Maggie and Harley Goddin
Goddin Landscape & Maintenance

In Memory of Leo Gore
Jenny Gore

In Memory of Louise Jones
Paulette van de Zande

In Memory of Steven Douglas Kotter
Mary Russell

In Memory of Norma Lewis
A.I.S.

In Memory of Benjamin H. Long
Cynthia Long

In Memory of Lib and Willie York
Donnie and Phyllis Brookshire

In Memory of Hany Younes and Nancy and Ed Phillips
Stewart Engineering

In Memory of Aat Zevenhuizen
Bell Family Foundation
Julia Bowers
John and Janice Branch
Hadley and Cameron Callaway
Commerical Carolina Corporation
George and Lynn Edwards
Caroline Luckett
Harold Medlin, Sr.
William and Mina Miller
Steve and Karen Moore
Carolyn Palmer
William Palmer
Perkins, Lund, Collar & Associates
George and Ethel Pruden
Pullen Park Golden Years Club
Taylor’s Nursery
Louis and Lytle Wooten

JC Raulston Arboretum 35th Anniversary Symposium

“Horticultural Madness”

September 23 and 24, 2011 (Friday and Saturday)

Speakers

Tony Avent, Plant Delights Nursery at Juniper Level Botanic Gardens

Jim Dodson, Beautiful Madness author and Pine Straw editor

Janet Draper, Horticulturist, Mary Livingston Ripley Garden, Smithsonian Institution

Hayes Jackson, Alabama Cooperative Extension Service

Panayoti Kelaidis, Director of Outreach, Denver Botanic Gardens

Larry Mellichamp, Director, University of North Carolina Charlotte Botanical Gardens

Bleddyn Wynn-Jones, Crug Farms

Registration: Early registration (ends August 31, 2011): $150.00 for members and $170.00 for nonmembers. Late registration (begins September 1, 2011): $170.00 for members and $190.00 for nonmembers. Please call Chris Glenn at (919) 513-7005 for more information or to register.

Gift-in-kind Donors

Support through in-kind gifts is vital to the success of our events, especially the Gala in the Garden and the JCRA Plant Sale. They also provide services and plant materials that keep the Arboretum beautiful for everyone.

Botanical Gifts
Adcock’s Nursery
Tim Alderton
Arboretum Mustila
Architectural Trees
Arnold Arboretum
Atlanta Botanical Garden
James and Faye Ballington
Lee Barnes
Bartlett Tree Research Laboratories Arboretum
Michael and Pam Beck
Bellevue Botanical Garden
Big Bloomers Flower Farm
Brent & Becky’s Bulbs
Briggs Nursery
Broken Arrow Nursery
Buchholz & Buchholz Nursery
Buds & Blooms Nursery
Camellia Forest Nursery
Campbell Road Nursery
Carl S. English, Jr., Botanical Garden
Carolina Native Nursery
Carolina Nurseries
Cheryl Kearns Landscaping
Cistus Nursery
Classic Viburnums
The Conard-Pyle Co.
Cox Arboretum and Gardens
David Creech
David Austin® Roses
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Denver Botanic Gardens
Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, NC State University
Richard Dufresne
Evolution Plants
Falls Revival (Jeffrey Bottoms and John Martin)
Christopher Glenn
Greenleaf Nursery Co., North Carolina Division
Greer Gardens
Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Extension Center
Hawksridge Farms
Hefner’s Nursery
Hidden Hollow Nursery
Highland Creek Nursery
Dan Hinkley and Robert Jones
Hoffman Nursery
The Holden Arboretum
Hoyt Arboretum
Iseli Nursery
The Ivy Farm
Jericho Farms
Charles Keith and Muki Fairchild
Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery
Thomas Krenitsky
Richard and Amelia Lane
Dennis Ledvina
Loch Laurel Nursery
Maymont Foundation
Monrovia Nursery of North Carolina
Montgomery Botanic Center
Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, NC State University
Nelson Nursery
Nichols Nursery
Norfolk Botanical Gardens Society
North American Rock Garden Society
North Creek Nurseries
Nurseries Caroliniana
Oakmont Nursery
Oregon State University
Orto Botanico di Napoli
Panoramic Farm
Panther Creek Nursery
Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden
Pender Nursery (Jim and Kathy Deal)
Pi Alpha Xi, NC State University
Piedmont Carolina Nursery
Piedmont Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society
Plant Delights Nursery
Rhododendron Species Foundation
Steven Roesch
The Sarah P. Duke Gardens
Saunders Brothers Nursery and Orchard
Shangai Maple Horticulture Co.
Sims Farms
Spartanburg Community College
Spring Meadow Nursery
Terra Nova Nurseries
Valerie Tyson and Richard Ehrhardt
U.S. National Arboretum
The Unique Plant
Walter’s Gardens
Washington Park Arboretum
Mark and Mary Weathington
Wells-Medina Nursery
Weston Farms
Ralph and Cheryl Whisnant
Bobby Wilder
Wilkerson Mill Gardens
Williford’s Nursery
Barry Yinger

Non-botanical Gifts
A & J Designs
Jill Adams
Tim Alderton
Dwen Andrews-Cita and Felix Cita Gomez
Thomas and Jeanne Andrus
Angus Barn
Atlantic Mulch & Erosion Control
Stuart Barbour
Belgian Chairs
Angela Bendorf Jamison
Beyond Borders
Bonefish Grill
Bosetti Art Tile
Audrey Brantly
Brian and Angela Brickman
John Buettner and John Dole
Mark Burnham
Carolina Stalite
Cheryl Hight Art
Cheryl Kearns Landscaping
CoolSweats
Creations by Julie
Marc Cubeta and Julie Haigler Cubeta
Custom Landscapes (Suzanne and Ed Edney)
Johnie and Genelle Dail
Daniel’s Restaurant and Catering
Davenport Florist at Five Points
Spring Davis
James and Kathryn Deal
Designing Solutions
Sylvia Drew
Elaine Miller Collection
EvoOrganic
Falls Revival (Jeffrey Bottoms and John Martin)
Finch Blueberry Nursery
Peter and Vivian Finkelstein
The Fire Place
Wayne Friedrich
Susan Galante
The Garden Hut
Garden Supply Co. (Keith and Deborah Ramsey)
The Go Pack Store
Debbie Hamrick and Ed Gaines
Larry and Kathy Hancock
Smitty Harvell
Marcy Hege
Ray and Annie Hibbs
Holiday Inn Cherokee
Homewood Nursery
Brian and Marty Howard
Imagine Photography
Jerry and Nina Jackson
jaGG Classic Wholesale
Jewelry by Artie
Juan and Beth Jimenez
Johnny Carino’s Italian
Carroll Johnson and Carl Paschal
Johnson Nursery Corp.
Loren and Barbara Kennedy
Patricia Korpik
Thomas Krenitsky
Anita Kuehne and Bill Swint
Bryce and Sue Lane
Richard and Amelia Lane
Linda Larkins
Lasting Impressions
Legacy Lighting
Betsy Lindemuth
Cynthia Long
Long Hill Bed and Breakfast
Lucky 32 (Cary)
McCracken Nursery
Diane McDaniel
Ronald and Verna Medeiros
Denny and Rita Mercer
David and Jean Millward
John Murawski
My Girlfriend’s Closet
Namestakes
Nativa Boutique
Natural Impressions Landscape Service
Nature’s Art by Susan Aldworth
Niche Gardens
Billy and Gail O’Neil
The Peanut Roaster
Richard Pearson and Joan Robertson
Pennington Seed Co.
Pharaoh’s
Phil Morgan Pottery
Pinkham’s Horticultural Services
John and Charlotte Presley
Hugh Proctor
Redwine’s Plantscaping & Special Events (Sylvia Redwine)
Wade and Kathy Reece
Alexandra Reid
Rey’s Restaurant
Salontology
The Silver Lining
Silver Palate Feeders
Bill Spruill
Marshall and Jan Stewart
Kent Stewart
Sungold Jewelry
Edward and Janice Swab
Tamarind India Bistro
Walt and Kathleen Thompson
Gordon Thorpe
Anitra Todd
Triangle Gardener (Beverly Hurley)
Valerie Tyson and Richard Ehrhardt
Vrb Photography
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks
Mark and Mary Weathington
Bee Weddington
David White and Janine LeBlanc
Robert White
Bobby Wilder
Words & Wires
Johnny and Jacqueline Wynne
Mary Yarborough
Z Enterprises
Sandie Zazzara

2010 Gala in the Garden Sponsors

The Gala in the Garden is the Arboretum’s signature fund-raising event held each year on the first Sunday in May. Thank you, 2010 Gala in the Garden sponsors, for making this event a huge success.

Gala in the GardenDiamond
North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association

Platinum
Bayer Advanced
Pender Nursery (Kathy and Jim Deal)

Gold
A. E. Finley Foundation
North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation

Silver
Anonymous
BB&T Insurance
Bell Family Foundation
Linda and Ted Bilderback
Bland Landscaping
The Brickman Group
Debbie Hamrick and Ed Gaines
Hawksridge Farms
Hoffman Nursery
Nina and Jerry Jackson
Taylor’s Nursery
Bobby Wilder
Worthington Farms

Bronze
Architectural Trees
Dorothy and William Burns
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Fair Products
Garland C. Norris Co.
The Hamlin Companies
Jere’s Landscaping
Julia Kornegay
Melda and Bill Lamm
LanArc
Robert Lyons
Anne Porter
Redwine’s Plantscaping
Kathy and Wade Reece
Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment (RISE)
Sampson Nursery
Anthea and Russell Tate
Kathleen and Walt Thompson
Wakefield Nursery & Landscaping
Bobby Ward and Roy Dicks
Georgina and Dennis Werner
Laura Willer and David Huffstetler
Wyatt-Quarles Seed Company
Jackie and Johnny Wynne
Rosemary and Smedes York

Benefit Providers

Sincere thanks to these generous businesses and organizations that help strengthen the JCRA membership program by offering special discounts and benefits to all current members of the JC Raulston Arboretum. (Please visit the JCRA Web site for more details about these membership benefits.)

Atlantic Avenue Orchid & Garden Center
Better Tree Care Associates
Campbell Road Nursery
Fairview Greenhouses and Garden Center
Garden Supply Co.
Gardening With Confidence
Homewood Nursery & Garden Center
Indigo Marsh Nursery
Lasting Impressions
Lendonwood Gardens
Long Hill Bed and Breakfast
Lynn van Dokkum Photography
Mountain View Nursery
Neomonde Deli
Norwood Road Garden
Oakmont Nursery
Outdoor Images
Ragazzi’s of Cary
Sarah P. Duke Gardens
WaterWise Garden Design

Volunteers

The gift of service is invaluable to the Arboretum, and we are very appreciative of the many hours our volunteers devote to the Arboretum. Our volunteers share their many talents and their time to make the Arboretum a wonderful place for all to enjoy. We couldn’t do it without them. Thanks to all of them

Volunteer Hours – January–December 2010

Our volunteers gave nearly 8,000 hours of their time in 2010. Their efforts have made the Arboretum a showplace in the community.

Mary and Claude Caldwell (sitting), recipients of the 2010 Honoary Volunteer Award200+ Hours
Mary Edith Alexander
Jayme Bednarczyk and Philip Abbott
Annie Hibbs
Beth Jimenez
James Schlitt
Bobby Wilder

100+ Hours
Angelia Beasley
Jennifer Cowan
Dennis Drehmel
David and Catherine Duch
Suzanne Edney
Jeffrey Evans
Michael Ferrell
Vivian Finkelstein
Wayne Friedrich
Linda and Glenn
Marilyn Golightly
Charles Kidder
Anita Kuehne and Bill Swint
Richard and Amelia Lane
Linda Larkins
Kerry and Patricia MacPherson
Jean Mitchell
John Pelosi
Walt and Kathleen Thompson
Dora Zia

40+ Hours
Rosanna Adams
Jeanne Andrus
Harriet Bellerjeau
Judy Bradyhouse
Mark Bruno
Tom Bumgarner
Lynn Canada
Anne Clapp
Laurie Cochran
Sherman Criner
Colin Daniels
C. J. Dykes
Christopher Glenn
Susan Grayson
Elizabeth Guzynski
Lawrence and Ilene Holmes
Margaret Jordan
Cheryl Kearns
Melanie Kelley
Sheila Kellogg
Patricia Korpik
Rudolf and Friederike Machilek
Sarah Marano
Diane McDaniel
Bob Davis and Judy Morgan-Davis
Laddie Munger
Sharon Munger
Elaine Pace
Mike Pittman
Charlotte Presley
Martha Ramirez
Alexandra Reid
Judy Ryan
John Schott
Nancy Simonsen
Ann Swallow
Laura Turas
Betsy Viall
Dee Welker
Ralph Whisnant
David White

Other Contributions of Hours
Judy Allen
Nick Baez
Debbie Beach
Lisa Bohlen-Admire
Vandy Bradow
Guy Broome
Regan Brown
John Buettner
Sydney Bunting
Claude and Mary Caldwell
Erin Champion
Young Cho
Beth Cleveland
Maggie Cole
Monika Coleman
Lynda Creutzburg
Linda Crocker
Kathy Crosby
Heather Curcio
Genelle Dail
Ellen Darst
Graham Dean
Cathy DeWitt
Sylvia Drew
Mary Lou Eycke
Roland Flory
Sonya Fox
Liza Gettles
Judy Harmon
Gail Harris
Sarah Harris
Barbara Harvey
Cynthia Heinlein
Timothy Hinton and Alisa Lycof-Hinton
Mitzi Hole
Marty Howard
David Josephus
Burhanvddin Kadibhai
Michelle Kern
Jennette King
Alexander and Carol Lawrence
Rebecca Lee
Cindy Levey
Paula Lumb
Megan Lyons
Robert Mackintosh
Alison Martin
Mary McCormick
Alberta McKay
Thearon and Vanette McKinney
Verna Medeiros
Guy Meilleur
Philip Meilleur
Rita Mercer
Martha Millichip
Frank Moore
Sabine Morrison
John Murawski
Irina Palumbo
Richard Pearson and Joan Robertson
Lara Rose Philbrook
Catherine Poff
Katherine Raj
Kathe Rauch
Cynthia Rayno
John Ross
Gerardo Serrano
Mary Lou Shanklin
Stanley Shieh
Sally Day Siggens
Carolyn Sinzenich
Ellen Stoltzfus
Jay Stolz
Tina Stricklen
John Suddath
Ellen Sullivan
Christine Thomson
Anitra Todd
Padma Tummala
Joanne Vandermast
Victoria Vass
Kevin Wang
Dennis Werner
Erica Winston
Laura Wright
Qian Wu
Tamara Yamaykin
Chuu-ni Yeung
Helen Yoest
Sandie Zazzara

Volunteering

JCRA Volunteer Construction Crew Gets the Job Done

By Beth Jimenez, JCRA Volunteer

Japanese Garden renovationA new volunteer group kicked off in January of 2010 and spent the last year helping put in place some of the design elements and changes envisioned by the Master Plan committee.

The newly formed JCRA volunteer construction crew came about as a remedy to that old dilemma of “too much work and not enough staff,” which often got in the way of moving forward with some of the plans the Master Plan committee envisioned. When the committee discussed possible changes, we knew the only things standing in the way of what we wanted done and what was feasible were money and the people to do the work. With Ted, Mark, and Tim committed to making the Arboretum work on a daily basis, we needed another way to get the non-plant related tasks done. Volunteers with strong backs, nimble fingers, a bit of good vision, and good tools could do it.

We began on a bitter cold morning in January 2010 by removing the raised walkway through the Japanese Garden in preparation for the garden’s renovation. At the same time, we built a temporary wall between the Japanese Garden and the Lath House. Next came raising the existing walls in the Japanese Garden’s front entrance, adding new roof caps, and adding a roof and cap over the new entrance cut into the wall between the Asian Valley and the Japanese Garden. We took a side trip to Knightdale to cut bamboo for some of the detail work and replaced the decorative runs of bamboo across the roof top. We worked hard and got the Japanese Garden looking great for its big debut at the Gala in May.

The team removed the structures in the Townhouse Garden and tore down the old Lath House, which had been one heavy snowfall away from coming down by itself. This project was challenging in that it was sometimes tough to avoid flying debris, but it was a lot of fun and brought out a gang of volunteers all full of anticipation of how beautiful the new Lath House was going to be. It indeed is a beautiful structure.

In mid-summer, we began a series of repairs to the Necessary. We cleaned out the storage area on the back of the building and painted the walls. The roof has been repaired, power washed, and stained. A man from Sanford with years of experience working with cedar shingles did the repair work since the height and shape of the roof told us it was a job for a professional.

A long list of upcoming projects awaits us this year. The gazebo in the Klein-Pringle White Garden needs repairs and a new coat of paint, as do benches and birdhouses on the Arboretum grounds. We need to build a new arbor for wedding photograph opportunities and add sides and a place for tool storage to the new Lath House.

The members of the construction crew range from the very skilled to the handy and willing to learn. We haven’t run across a job yet that we aren’t willing to tackle. This past year was a good one, full of challenging work and rewarding results.

Volunteer News

By Barbara Kennedy, Volunteer Coordinator

We are so lucky to have such dependable and loyal volunteers. They do so much to make the Arboretum look beautiful. As a result of their suggestions, we have added several new jobs for volunteers. The construction crew works on projects that need to be fixed or renovated, like the Lath House. We now have a group of volunteer photographers who take pictures at our events. The volunteer event planners work on developing new activities, such as trips and open gardens. And we have seed collecting volunteers who go through the gardens collecting seeds to be shared by other botanical gardens around the country. We are thrilled to have the help from these new groups.

New Volunteers

We are happy to welcome 15 new volunteers. They have been very active and contributed in many different areas.

Guy Broome, Evening and Weekend Gardener
Sydney Bunting, Gardener
Jennie Cowan, Children’s Program
Ellen Darst, Gardener
Sonya Fox, Visitor Center
Liza Gettles, Flower Arranging
Burhanvddin Kadibhai, Gardener
Michelle Kern, Gardener
Megan Lyons, Gardener
Sharon Munger, Special Projects
Irina Palumbo, Gardener and Photographer
Katherine Raj, Gardener
Tamara Sanderford, Gardener
Ellen Sullivan, Special Projects
Denny Werner, Tour Guide

Volunteers at Work

The Annual Color Trials are one of our biggest attractions. Irina Palumbo takes a closer look at all the flowering annuals. Irina Palumbo   In order to ready plants for the Annual Plant Distribution, pots have to be weeded and labeled. Dave White helps us every year with getting the pots ready. Dave White
         
Mulching the beds is an ongoing project. Trish MacPherson, Bernadette Clark, and Melanie Kelley have just finished mulching the Annual Color Trials. Trish MacPherson, Bernadette Clark, and Melanie Kelley   Preparation for the Annual Plant Distribution takes several days to set up the plants. Pat Korpik, Amelia Lane, and Laurie Cochran take a break on a very rainy day. Pat Korpik, Amelia Lane, and Laurie Cochran
         
Our Volunteer Appreciation Dinner in May was so much fun. Joan Robertson, Dick Pearson, Charlie Kidder, Mark Weathington, Liz Guzynski, and Linda Larkins are just a few of the volunteers and staff who enjoyed a great evening. Dick Pearson, Charlie Kidder, Mark Weathington, Liz Guzynski, and Linda Larkins   Children’s Program volunteers Liz Bridges, Rebecca Pledger, Brigitte Crawford, Irene Palmer, Katie Pound, and Maureen Donini (l–r) play along during a February training session. Liz Bridges, Rebecca Pledger, Brigitte Crawford, Irene Palmer, Katie Pound, and Maureen Donini

HTML formatting by Christopher Todd Glenn
Programs and Education Coordinator
JC Raulston Arboretum
Department of Horticultural Science
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC 27695-7522

© The JC Raulston Arboretum, April 2011

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