Brian E. Jackson

Assistant Professor, Ornamental Horticulture

Research Publications Substrates Lab Links
 
 

REFEREED PUBLICATIONS

Jackson, B.E., R.D. Wright, and M.C. Barnes. 2010. Methods of Constructing a Pine Tree Substrate from Various Wood Particle Sizes, Organic Amendments, and Sand for Desired Physical Properties and Plant Growth. HortScience 45:103-112.

Jackson, B.E., R.D. Wright, N.Gruda. 2009. Container Medium pH in a Pine Tree Substrate Amended with Peatmoss and Dolomitic Limestone Affects Plant Growth. HortScience 44(7):1983–1987.

Jackson, B.E., R.D. Wright and M.M. Alley. 2009. Comparison of fertilizer nitrogen availability, nitrogen immobilization, substrate carbon dioxide efflux, and nutrient leaching in peat-lite, pine bark, and pine tree substrates. HortScience 44:781-790.

Jackson, B.E., R.D. Wright and J.R. Seiler. 2009. Changes in chemical and physical properties of pine tree substrate and pine bark during long-term nursery crop production. HortScience 44:791-799.

Jackson, B.E. and R.D. Wright. 2009. Pine tree substrate: An alternative and renewable growing media for horticulture crop production. Acta Hort. 819:265-272.

Wright, R.D., B.E. Jackson, M.C. Barnes, and J.F. Browder. 2009. The landscape performance of annual bedding plants grown in pine tree substrate. HortTechnology 19:78-82.

Jackson, B.E., R.D. Wright, and M.C. Barnes. 2008. Pine tree substrate, nitrogen rate, particle size, and peat amendment affects poinsettia growth and substrate physical properties. HortScience 43:2155-2161.

Jackson, B.E., R.D. Wright, J.F. Browder, J. Roger Harris, and A.X. Niemiera. 2008. Effect of fertilizer rate on growth of azalea and holly in pine bark and pine tree substrates. HortScience 43:1561-1568.

Wright, R.D., B.E. Jackson, J.F. Browder, and J.G. Latimer. 2008. Growth of chrysanthemum in ground pine trees requires additional fertilizer. HortTechnology 18:111-115.

Wright, A.N., R.D. Wright, B.E. Jackson, and J.F. Browder. 2007. Effect of backfill composition on post-transplant root growth of Kalmia latifolia L. J. Environ. Hort. 25:145-149.

Dute, R.R., B.E. Jackson, R.D. Atkins, and D.R. Folkerts. 2007. Anatomy of the laminar organs of Commelina erecta. Southeastern Naturalist 6:47-66.

Wright, R.D., J.F. Browder, and B.E. Jackson. 2006. Ground pine chips as a substrate for container-grown woody nursery crops. J. Environ. Hort. 24:181-184.

Jackson, B.E., A.N. Wright, D.M. Cole, and J.L. Sibley. 2005. Cotton gin compost as a substrate component in container production of nursery crops. J. Environ. Hort. 23:118-122.

Jackson, B.E., A.N. Wright, J.L. Sibley, and J.M. Kemble. 2005. Root growth of three horticultural crops grown in pine bark amended cotton gin compost. J. Environ. Hort. 23:133-137.

POPULAR PRESS ARTICLES

Jackson, B.E. November 2009. Pine tree substrates for greenhouse crops. Greenhouse Production News 14-18.

Jackson, B.E. September 2009. Back to the grind: pine tree substrate encourages prolific root growth in container plants. Nursery Management and Production 28-34.

Jackson, B.E. 2009 A suitable substrate alternative. American Nurseryman 209 (9): 28-33.

R.D. Wright and B.E. Jackson. 2008. A new substrate for container crops. American Nurseryman 208 (3):26-32.

R.D. Wright, J.F. Browder and B.E. Jackson. January 2007. Ground pine chips as a container substrate. Nursery Management and Production 86-88.

RESEARCH PROCEEDINGS

Wright, R.D., B.E. Jackson, and M.C. Barnes. 2009. White pine as a pine tree substrate. Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 54:221-223.

Jackson, B.E. and R.D. Wright. 2008. Changes in physical properties of a pine tree substrate in containers over time. Comb. Proc. Intl. Plant Prop. Soc. 58:93-98.

Wright, R.D., B.E. Jackson, and M.C. Barnes. 2008. Pine tree substrate construction for optimal water holding capacity and air space. Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 53:54-56.

Jackson, B.E. and R.D. Wright. 2008. Nitrogen immobilization in a pine tree substrate during short-term crop production. Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 53:51-53.

Jackson, B.E. and R.D. Wright. 2007. Pine tree substrate: fertility requirements for nursery and greenhouse crops. Comb. Proc. Intl. Plant Prop. Soc. 57:680-684.

Wright, R.D. and B.E. Jackson. 2007. Pine tree substrate: A promising alternative to peat moss and pine bark. Comb. Proc. Intl. Plant Prop. Soc. 57:632-635.

Jackson, B.E. and R.D. Wright. 2007. Pine tree substrate: fertility requirements. Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 52:58-61.

Jackson, B.E., R.D. Wright, and J.O. James. 2007. Pine tree substrate: current status. Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 52:53-57.

Jackson, B.E., J.F. Browder, and R.D. Wright. 2006. Comparison of nutrient requirements between pine chip and pine bark substrates.  Comp. Proc. Intl. Plant Prop. Soc. 56:623-626.

Jackson, B.E., J.F. Browder, and R.D. Wright. 2006. A comparison of nutrient requirements between pine chip and pine bark substrates.  Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 51:30-32.

Saunders, T., J.F. Browder, B.E. Jackson, and R.D. Wright. 2006. Particle size of a pine chips substrate affects plant growth.  Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 51:46-48.

Rau, B., B.E. Jackson, J.F. Browder, and R.D. Wright. 2006. Wood substrates derived from a variety of tree species affect plant growth.  Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 51:43-45.

Browder, J.F., J. Smithson, B.E. Jackson, and R.D. Wright. 2006. Pine chips: peat substrate ratios affect plant growth.  Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 51:98-99.

Jackson, B.E., A.N. Wright, and J.L. Sibley. 2005. Effect of cotton gin compost and pine bark substrate blends on root growth of two horticulture crops.  Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 50:54-58.

Wright, A.N., B.E. Jackson, R.D. Wright, and J.F. Browder. 2005. Effect of backfill composition on post-transplant root growth.  Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 50:548-550.

Jackson, B.E., A.N. Wright, and J.L. Sibley. 2004. Cotton gin compost as a substrate component in container production of ornamental plants.  Proc. Southern Nursery Assoc. Research Conf. 49:67-69.

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES

Wright, R.D. and J.F. Browder. 2005. Chipped Pine Logs: A Potential Substrate for Greenhouse and Nursery Crops. HortScience 40:1513-1515.

Gruda, N, B.J. Rau, and R.D. Wright. 2009. Laboratory Bioassay and Greenhouse Evaluation of a Pine Tree Substrate Used as a Container Substrate. Eur. J. Hort. Sci. 74:73-78.

Wright, R. and J. Latimer, J. 2007. Grinding Pine Logs to Use as a Container Substrate. Greenhouse Production News, January 2007.

Yepsen, R. and Goldstein, N. January 2009. Historical Perspective: Grinders, Chippers, Shredders. Biocycle, pp. 16-22.

McKeever, D.B. December 1999. How Woody Residues are Recycled in the United States. Biocycle, pp. 33-44.

Gray, K. March 1999. The Many Routes to Recycling Wood – North Carolina. Biocycle,  pp. 64-66.

Hodge, A, D. Robinson, and A. Fitter. 2000. Are Microorganisms More Effective Than Plants At Competing For Nitrogen? Trends in Plant Science, 5:304-308.

Frangi, P., G. Amoroso, F. Ferrini, and A. Fini. 2008. Growth of Ornamental Shrubs in Wood Fiber-Based Growing Media. Acta Hort. 801:1571-1575.

Scott, M. and B. Burbridge. 1991. Working to Beat the Peat Problem. Grower 116:15-18.

Commercial Wood-fiber Substrate in Europe: Toresa® Holzfaser (wood fiber with no Nitrogen impregnation).

Commercial Wood-fiber Substrate in Europe: Toresa® Spezial (wood fiber with Nitrogen impregnation).