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Fish Biological Response Data

This is the fish biological response data.

Fish group 1: 04/02/04 14:04 through 04/16/04 10:02
Fish group 2 04/16/04 13:59 through 04/30/04 10:14
Fish group 3: 04/30/04 13:29 through 05/14/04 10:19
Fish group 4: 05/14/04 15:01 through 05/28/04 10:23
Fish group 5: 05/28/04 14:14 through 06/01/04 9:59

No fish mortality occurred during the monitoring period
Nine alarm events occurred during the monitoring period

Click on the graphs below to enlarge.

Hydrological data
Fish Response Data

Event 1 (4/9/04 09:04 through 4/9/04 09:19) The 15 minute alarm event was caused by increased ventilatory rate and average ventilatory depth. The alarm event was linked to maintenance activity within the biomonitoring facility.

Event 2 (04/12/04 12:47-13:02, and 04/12/04 14:02-14:32): Alarm events were caused by increased ventilatory rate and average ventilatory depth. This resulted in both an increased ventilatory rate and average ventilatory depth. The alarm event was linked to maintenance activity within the biomonitoring facility.


Event 3 (05/19/04 19:16-19:31 and 20:46-21:01) The alarm events were caused by increase ventilatory rate. Water quality does not appear to be changing dramatically when compared to periods of no alarm response.

Event 4 (05/20/04 14:01-16:01) The alarm events were caused by increased ventilatory rate and cough rate. Water quality does not appear to be changing dramatically when compared to periods of no alarm response.

Event 5 (Multiple responses 05/22/04 23:38 through 05/28/04 10:23) The alarm events were caused primarily by increased ventilatory rate and cough rate. A corollary increase in conductivity (from 5 to 17 mS/cm and decreasing dissolved oxygen from 6.6 to 1.8 mg/L was noted which most likely contributed to the alarm event. The increased cough rates, low dissolved oxygen and increasing conductivity might be indicative of an inflowing algal bloom from the Neuse River.

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