Workshop Agenda

Instructions for preparing talks

Building US-China Collaboration in Biodiversity Studies – Frontier Issues, New Approaches, and Opportunities Workshop Agenda
October 15th 5:00 PM – October 18th 12:30 PM, 2015

Funded by the US National Science Foundation, North Carolina State University, and NSF China and presented at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
 
Overview
We invite you to participate in a workshop sponsored by the US NSF and NSF China to discuss and explore opportunities, resources, and strategies for increasing collaborative research in biodiversity science by US and Chinese investigators.
 
This workshop will bring together experts in biodiversity to highlight successful examples of collaboration, discuss frontier issues in US-China biodiversity, and promote innovative approaches and new opportunities for collaborative studies. Mini-talks in topical groups will communicate expertise and interest among the participants and facilitate new linkages and ideas.
 
Stated objectives of the workshop

1) Provide an overview of available resources, new opportunities, and on-going biodiversity research in the US and China; here, we will feature contributions of leading researchers who are currently participating in highly integrated, multi-national projects;,
 
2) Identify frontier issues for collaborative biodiversity research;
 
3) Summarize new genomic approaches and share current advances in study design and analytical innovation that will broaden and more fully integrate genetic data within biodiversity research;
 
4) Highlight approaches towards integrating studies across environmental domains (e.g., above/below ground; aquatic, terrestrial, atmospheric interfaces);
 
5) Explore parallels and relationships among dimensions of biodiversity in different biomes, the effects of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services, and mechanisms underlying diversity disparities between China and the United States in both similar, and highly unique, environments.
 
6) Propose new ideas and approaches to NSF USA and NSF China for special and/or increased funds for US-China biodiversity studies.
 
Schedule

Arrivals – Thursday, October 15th
Participants are asked to arrive before 4pm on Thursday, October 15th to enable a full two-and-one-half-day schedule of working sessions. If you encounter logistical issues prior to or upon your arrival in Raleigh and require assistance, we encourage you to contact Qiuyun (Jenny) Xiang, qyxiang@ncsu.edu. Lodging: Avent Ferry Complex – NCSU Guest Rooms Avent Ferry Complex – NCSU Guest Rooms (Swan Quarter Hall, 2112 Avent Ferry Road, Raleigh) and Wolf Ridge Apartment (Tower Hall, 1910 Entrepreneur Drive, Raleigh) 
 
October 15 - Welcome Reception
5:30 – 8:30 pm Workshop Welcome Mixer – Join us at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, NRC, 4th floor for light fare and beverages.
 
Workshop Day 1 – Friday, October 16th
The workshop begins at 7:30am in the NCMNS Nature Research Center, 4th floor (121 West Jones Street Raleigh, NC 27603). Opening remarks and discussion will cover the scope and purpose of the workshop and introduce the organizers, host institutions, and participants. Presentations highlighting the current status of US-China biodiversity research, new opportunities, and grand challenges will follow. Lunch will be provided on site.
We will divide into three groups for lightning talks and discussion following three keynote lectures in the morning. In the afternoon, we will have four keynote lectures after lunch followed by small group and full group discussions. There will be three lightning talks in each group per day and a total 18 talks in two days.  Lightning talks will provide 15 minutes for each participant to introduce their work, resources, and interests of collaboration (for specific instructions, see below). The lightning talk sessions will be followed by group discussion on new opportunities and questions relevant to collaborative studies on US-China biodiversity.
 
Dinner is on your own or in small groups in local restaurants in Raleigh or near NCSU. Food expenses will be reimbursed to the US participants and paid by the workshop for the Chinese participants.


TIME

ITEM

Owner (s)

7:30 – 8:30a

Breakfast and Preparation

 

8:30 – 9:15a

Introductions and Logistics

Wiegmann

9:15 – 10:30a

Presentations (25 min/ talk)
· Keping Ma – Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), China. “Efforts in mapping plants in China”
· Robert Ricklefs – U. Missouri, USA. “Local and regional correlates of forest tree species richness”
· Pamela Soltis – U. Florida, USA. “Phylogenetic and Ecological Diversity across an Ancient Floristic Disjunction”

Xiang

10:30 – 11:00a

Coffee Break

 

11:00 – 12:25p

Breakout Groups for 15 minute talks  (3 per group, 9 total)
(listed below)

Cryan

12:15 – 1:15

Lunch  (catered box lunch – on site)

 

1:15 – 2:45p

Presentations (25 min/talk)
· Lin Jiang – George Tech, USA. “Testing Darwin's naturalization hypothesis: experiments and a meta-analysis”
· Lei Cheng – Zhejiang University, China. “Microbial responses to climate change: linking microbial identity to function”
· Brian Wiegmann – NC State University, USA. “International phylogenomics to assemble, use, and preserve the tree of life ”
· James S. Clark – Duke University, USA. “Functional and community ecology; effects of global changes in climate, CO2, and disturbance on forests.”

Wiegmann

2:55– 3:15p

Coffee Break

 

3:15 – 4:30p

Small Group Discussions

McClain

4:30 – 5:30p

Reporting and Full Group Discussion

 

5:30p

Leaving for Dinner – Free exploration

Wiegmann, Cryan, Craig, and Hu

 
Afternoon Lightning Talks
 
Group I:
1. Ecologists’ Guide to High-throughput Sequencing: New Episode; Zhou, Xin, China National GeneBank, BGI-Shenzhen, China
 
2. Co-diversification and Co-evolution of Fig and Fig Wasp: Classic Model and New Insights; Chen, Jin, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences
 
3. Interactions between Soil Microbial Community Structure and Ecological Process under Global Environmental Changes; Sheng, Weijun, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences
 
Group II:
1. How Historical Constraints, Local Adaptation, and Species Interactions Shape Biodiversity Across an Ancient Floristic Disjunction – the First Year’s Advance; Zhao, Yunpeng and Fu, Chengxin, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
2. Patterns, Dynamics, and Maintenance Mechanisms of Woody Plant Biodiversity in Temperate Forests of Northeast China; Hao, Zhanqing, Xugao Wang, Fei Lin, Zuoqiang Yuan, State Key Laboratory of Forest and Soil Ecology, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110164, P. R. China
3. Impacts of climate change on forest ecosystems; Fei, Songlin, Purdue University
 
Group III:
1. Community Structure of Zooplankton in Polluted River Ecosystems: From Methods to Determinants; Aibin Zhan, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085, China
2. Assessment of river ecosystem health in subtropical rivers; Quanfa Zhang, Key Laboratory of Aquatic Botany and Watershed Ecology, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430074, China
3. Challenges of DNA barcoding woody species in subtropical forest: A case study of Dinghushan Nature Reserve in South China; Xue-Jun Ge, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 51060, China)
 
Workshop Day 2 – Saturday, October 17th
 A similar format as Day 1 will be followed.

TIME

ITEM

Owner (s)

7:30 – 8:30a

Breakfast and Preparation

 

8:30 – 9:30a

Reporting and Full Group Discussion

McClain

9:30a – 11:10a

Presentations (25 min/talk)
· Jingle Wu – Arizona State U., "Testing the Biodiversity-Ecosystem Functioning Relationship in the World’s Largest Grassland: Overview of the IMGRE Project”
· John Morse – Clemson University, USA. “Insect diversity, water quality and aquatic insects as indicators of ecosystem health”
· Fuwen Wei - Institute of Zoology, CAS, China. “Evolutionary conservation biology of giant pandas: population history and adaptive evolution”
· Chris Marshall – U. Chicago, USA. “Microbial Electrosynthetic Metabolism, unlocking the potential of biodiversity”
 

Xiang

11:10 – 11:30a

Coffee Break

 

11:30 – 12:30p

Breakout Groups -- 15 minute talks  (3 per group, 9 total)

Cryan

12:30 – 1:15p

Lunch  (catered box lunch – on site)

 

1:15 – 3:30p

Presentations (25 min/talk)
· Fangliang He – U. Alberta, Canada. “Dance with neighbors: what we have learned about species coexistence in tree communities from the global stem-mapped forest plots?”
· Conghe Song – U. North Carolina, USA. “Monitoring Impacts of Land-Cover/Land-Use Change on Plant Biodiversity with Remotely Sensed Data from Multiple Sensors”
· Zhiheng Wang – Beijing University, China. “Macroecology of Chinese woody plants: species and functional diversity in response to climate change”
· Hong Qian – Illinois State, USA. “Comparative studies on biodiversity and biogeography of eastern Asia and North America”
· Doug Soltis – U Florida, USA. “Transcriptomic comparisons of the ancient floristic disjunction between Eastern Asia and Eastern North America”

 

Wiegmann

3:30 – 4:00p

Coffee Break

 

4:00 – 4:45p

Breakout Group Discussions

McClain

4:45 – 5:15p

Reporting and Full Group Discussion

McClain

6:30p

Dinner -– Banquet in JC Raulston Arboretum

 

 
Afternoon Lightning Talks:
Group I:
1. Interaction of Macroevolution and Local Community Processes in Eastern Asia and North America;  Mi, Xiangcheng and Ma, Keping, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100093, China.
2. Climate Change and Alpine Grassland Ecosystems:  Biodiversity, Functioning and Ecosystem Services; He, Jin-Sheng, Department of Ecology, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University
3. Elevational Diversity Patterns of Native vs. Nonnative Species; Guo, Qinfeng1, Fei, Songlin2, Shen, Zehao3, et al.1 USDA FS – Southern Research Station, RTP, NC, USA , 2 Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, IN, USA
 
Group II:
1. A biogeochemical view of climate change effects on biodiversity
Wang, Hongjun1, Curtis J. Richardson1, Weidong Wang2, Chengqing Yin2
1 Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
2 Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, P. R. China
2. Species coexistence, phylogenetic structure, and functional traits in the forest community
Yu, Shixiao, Department of Ecology, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
 3. Li, Dezhu, Kunming Institute of Botany

Day 3. Sunday, October 18th
 


TIME

ITEM

Owner (s)

8:00 – 9:00a

Breakfast at the NRC

 

9:00 – 10:30a

Subgroup Summaries and Full Group Discussion

McClain

10:30 – 11:00a

Coffee Break

 

11:00 – 11:30a

Wrap-up and Concluding Remarks

McClain

11:30 – 12:30p

Lunch  (catered box lunch – on site)

 

 
Afternoon:
Free afternoon at NCMNS, NCSU Arboretum or Duke Gardens, or Departure
 
Dinner: Jenny’s house at 5:30 -8:30 pm
 
Monday (Oct. 19th) - Wednesday (Oct. 21st): Bus Trip to Highlands Biological Station – Delegate from China.
(Bring a wind jacket or light sweater; hiking shoes and clothing; own toothbrush and toothpaste).
 
A book about the mountain by Stephanie B. Jeffries and Thomas R. Wentworth Exploring Southern Appalachian Forestshttp://uncpress.unc.edu/books/11596.html, is available for purchase at the workshop.
 
Oct. 22. Chinese delegate departure.

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